1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Hello from Melbourne!

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by MRSROK, Aug 6, 2017.

  1. MRSROK

    MRSROK · Member

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Hello All!

    I have just been diagnosed T2 last week with fasting BS 17.9 m/mol. :( Got an emergency appointment with my Dr who was lovely and gave me loads of encouragement and positive advice. Prescribed Metformin and I have started exercising and low carb diet. Nurse ran me through my monitor, although I was familiar as I had gestational diabetes x 2 with my boys.

    So, my story goes....I kinda knew I wasn't well as I had a lot of symptoms for a few weeks before I could face the music and get my fasting bloods taken. I was like a bear in the mornings, headaches, sugar cravings, leg cramps at night, pins and needles in my feet and generally just felt like SH*T all day. How I managed for so long without getting help I don't know...

    So I do come here with some questions. How long and how effective is Metformin? I've read a lot about the HFLC diet and how this can replace drugs in the longer term, but how long do you give it to work? Also, do the stomach cramps go away after you have taken it a while?

    I could see I had Diabetes well before I was diagnosed and unfortunately have a lot of risk factors, my Doctor is almost certain it's down to genes as I only weigh 42kgs, always been fit, healthy and active until the past 4 years. I have hypothyroidism, it's in my family, I have low vitamin D and low BP.

    Anyway, what I wasn't prepared for was the changes in my diet. I LOVE FOOD. I am a real foodie and love to bake and cook at home. I actually have a few jobs relating to food which sucks right now! :( I am having a real emotional rollercoaster with everything right now - I love breakfast, I love carbs, crisps, chocolate! Diabetes is breaking my heart right now. Don't get me wrong, I love all the healthy stuff too - but I am just so upset that I am so restricted now in my food choices.

    Well that's my story for now! I am a Scottish girl living down under in Melbourne, Australia.

    Looking forward to the support, advice and place to vent my frustrations and share my positive energy.

    MRSROK
     
    • Hug Hug x 1
    #1 MRSROK, Aug 6, 2017 at 1:28 PM
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2017
  2. Ann1982

    Ann1982 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    324
    Trophy Points:
    123
    Hi and welcome. I'll tag @daisy1 to get you some info for newbies. Just ask any question you like. Although we are not doctors, we can only let you know what works for us individually. It may not suit you. I found the low carb diet works well for me, need to lose weight though, but it can be adapted to suit yourself. It was easy to get used to. Take care.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

    Messages:
    26,459
    Likes Received:
    4,878
    Trophy Points:
    248
    @MRSROK

    Hello MrsRok and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope it will be useful to you. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 250,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.

    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. They're all free.
    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why
    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  4. perry1960

    perry1960 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    541
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Hello MrsRok and welcome.lots of good advice on here from very knowledgeable folk that will always help with any questions/concerns you may have:)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Squire Fulwood

    Squire Fulwood Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    6,063
    Likes Received:
    4,824
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I think your two main questions are, Do Metformin side effects ease with time and how long does it take for LCHF to work..

    Some people are not adversely affected by Metformin at all, some have a very bad time, some ask for Metformin SR and it is kinder to them and some find the effects ease. Whichever type you are, if they cause you discomfort or pain go back to your clinic and talk to them. They are not there to make you worse.

    LCHF should improve matters almost straight away. If you stop eating things that raise your BS to an unacceptable level then that's the result you are looking for. Some people may take a few days settling in since the body may need to make adjustments. I am pleased to see that an Australian Doctor has put you on a low carb diet (if it was his idea) since I thought that Australia was still a little sensitive after the Gary Fettke case.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. ziggy_w

    ziggy_w Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,950
    Likes Received:
    8,514
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi @MRSROK,

    I really, really empathize with you. I felt exactly like you when I was first diagnosed. I was in mourning about all the foods I could no longer eat.

    Right now, the shock of diagnosis is still fresh -- but you will probably be feeling much better soon. You say that you are a foodie and that you like baking and cooking at home. Do you enjoy experimenting with food?

    Experimentation you will show you many new ways in which you can adapt old recipes to a low carb life style and you will also discover new foods you will enjoy.

    On a positive note, many of us low carbers can still enjoy chocolate, without too much of an impact on blood sugars, as long as the chocolate has a high cocoa content (e.g. 85% or 90% Lindt chocolate).
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    14,302
    Likes Received:
    8,225
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hello, @MRSROK - I won't reiterate anything the others have said, but would add that if you like to bake, it doesn't have to be game over for the baking tins and cookie sheet trays. There are many, many options for low carb baking. The results aren't identical to the "real thing", but some options are really rather good.

    Of course, Dr google can help you out, but if you go to http://www.diabeticgoodbaking.com/ , you will find some fab stuff. The site owner, @ewelina is a member here, and has T1, so she knows what gives.

    I'm sure you'll "meet" some interesting people here. We have members from all over the world, including quite a few Aussies.

    Give it a few more weeks and you'll begin to feel at home. :)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. MRSROK

    MRSROK · Member

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Wow!! Thanks DCUKMod - that baking site is wonderful! :) @ewelina - what a wonderful resource for diabetics.
     
  9. MRSROK

    MRSROK · Member

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Thanks for the replies - I am on the SR Metformin tablets. So I'll see how they go with the low carb diet.
     
  10. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

    Messages:
    18,448
    Likes Received:
    27,587
    Trophy Points:
    298
    • Friendly Friendly x 2
  11. MRSROK

    MRSROK · Member

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Yes! i love to experiment with food! Problem right now is that I am trying so hard to get my sugars down that I actually can't think about food right now - so focused on what I can and can't have right now :( I actually didn't eat too much pasta and potatoes - it's mainly rice and sushi rice I am missing at the moment. As for chocolate - I hate high cocoa ones as they are too bitter for me. I have found some good high protein low carb bars for now as a treat til I work on making some of my own treats .
     
    • Like Like x 2
  12. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,004
    Likes Received:
    15,482
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I was diagnosed 3 months ago and loved chocolate. Never a day went by without eating some. I went cold turkey and cut out chocolate completely from day one of diagnosis but missed it terribly. I had the same reaction as you when it was suggested I might try 85% chocolate! Yuk! But after about ten weeks I thought I'd buy some and try it, as I knew my husband would eat it if I didn't! I have just one or two pieces now and my tastes must have changed, I love it now! :hungry::happy:
    As for cooking and baking I've used the diet doctor website a lot:
    https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb
    Loads of recipes with weird and wonderful ingredients, bet you never knew you can make pancakes from cottage cheese?! :playful::)
     
    • Like Like x 2
  13. ziggy_w

    ziggy_w Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,950
    Likes Received:
    8,514
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi @MRSROK,

    Thanks for your reply.

    It is entirely understandable that you are primarily focused on keeping your carbs down at the moment. Getting your blood sugars to come down is a priority.

    When first diagnosed, this was really important for me too. As time went on, however, I started experimenting. After this, I kept discovering more and more ways to adapt recipes. Everytime I found a new low carb way to prepare old favorites, it was like a celebration.

    Today, I have discovered ways to prepare low-carb New York cheese cake, carrot cake, brownies, mousse au chocolat, ice cream and bread. As you enjoy experimenting, you will almost certainly find ways to prepare old favorites too.

    I agree with @Rachox, after a while your tastes begin to change. Things that didn't taste sweet before, now start tasting sweet -- such as bell peppers. Like you, I have never liked high cocoa content chocolates before, but now I enjoy them more than I ever enjoyed milk chocolates. The high protein low carb bars are good alternative too.

    Instead of rice, many of us low carbers grate cauliflower. Admittedly, it is not quite the same as rice, but it still works well for a lot of dishes, but it probably won't work for sushi. Maybe you could enjoy sashimi instead of sushi?
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    #13 ziggy_w, Aug 7, 2017 at 10:23 PM
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2017
  14. MRSROK

    MRSROK · Member

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    23

    Whats your thoughts on the Sugar Free Chocolate Bars and the High Protein/Low Carb Bars? I have a few of them and loved them - low carbs is like 1.1g! I think these "should" be better than the normal ones right??
     
  15. MRSROK

    MRSROK · Member

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    23

    Thanks @ziggy_w! Yes, I am very lucky here in Australia as we have an abundance of amazing Japanese restaurants and selection of fish at the markets for sashimi - which was already my fav cuisine so no probs there! Infact, I think I consumed more sashimi than sushi anyway :) Also love miso soup and asian veg. I have made a lot of "raw" deserts such as carrot cake and cheesecakes but have to be wary of the dates in there now.

    Yes, veg "pasta" all the craze hahahaha

    Need to dig out my spiralizer!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,004
    Likes Received:
    15,482
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I haven't tried sugar free chocolate, it's seems to be very expensive however it's definitely the carb count you need to be looking at rather than just the 'sugar free' label though. I haven't tried high protein bars so I just had a quick look for them on Amazon UK. They all seem to be quite high carb there :(
    BTW I just tried Cauli rice with Chilli con carne last night, I use it regularly with curry but it goes equally well with chilli.
    I've just eaten strawberries and cream with low carb pancakes for breakfast :)
     
    • Like Like x 1
    #16 Rachox, Aug 8, 2017 at 9:42 AM
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2017
  17. ziggy_w

    ziggy_w Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,950
    Likes Received:
    8,514
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi @MRSROK,

    Great that there are a lots of good Japanese restaurants in Australia. I'm a bit envious. A lot of places I've been to in Germany aren't very good. There were even one or two were the fish already smelled a bit. (Needless to say -- I didn't frequent those restaurants again.) If you don't mind my asking: How often do you typically have Japanese food in a month?

    Dates in carrot cake sounds great -- though I haven't seen a recipe with dates before. Unfortunately, on low carb diet, dates are probably out. The recipe I use includes walnuts and, of course carrots, lots of spices, and walnut flour instead of regular flour (though almond flour is probably an even better option). You can use erythritol or xylitol as a sweetener. Both taste very similar to real sugar withoute a strange aftertaste.

    Xylitol is poisonous to dogs as it causes an insulin response in dogs and lowers their blood sugars to dangerous levels (so if you have a dog, you may not want to use it), but is unproblematic for people as we don't use insulin to metabolize it. If you decide to add xylitol, go easy on the quantity in the beginning since it can cause gastro-intestional problems if used in excess.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook