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Hello! Newbie help!

Discussion in 'Reactive Hypoglycemia' started by Alicki, Apr 18, 2016.

  1. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    well, I am not aware of any official guidelines as to that.
    @nosher8355 have you ever come across anything giving actual number guidelines for RHers?

    There are figures around for diabetics, see this link:
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/diabetes_care/blood-sugar-level-ranges.html

    but those are (in my opinion) generous, and they don't take into account the fact that RHers will trigger a reactive hypo if we go too high - and that often the peak is in the first hour.
    Normal T2 testing wouldn't ever reveal such peaks, and unless the low is spot on the 2 hr mark, the lows won't show up either.

    Plus, we all seem to peak at different times, with the fat and protein and fibre in the meal affecting the peak rate too.

    Honestly, the best thing is to work out your own personal tolerances to carbs, and then stay within those limits. I think we are all different. Kaz eats quite a few more carbs than nosher and I, while nosher eats small meals regularly, and I find my body likes to have a negligible breakfast and a medium lunch, with a larger evening meal (my insulin resistance decreases as the day gets longer).

    For me, my RH triggers are less about g of carbs, and more about type of food. Grains will create a bigger RH reaction than starchy veg or even sugar, while I can eat VAST amounts of non-starchy veg with no issues at all.

    You may find your RH triggers are different again.

    Best thing to do is to do some test runs on different foods (portion size is key. e.g. you may tolerate 1 potato well, but 2 potatoes may trigger you)
     
  2. DanteNXS

    DanteNXS Reactive hypoglycemia · Active Member

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    This is all so chaotic, at least to me, but I have to do it and I will. I just took my 2 after meal BG readings and they are as follows:

    Waking BG: 89
    Breakfast: Veggie shake w/nuts, coconut oil, garlic, and water
    1.5 hour BG: 110 ( I lost track of the time)
    2 hour BG: 94

    These have been pretty much the same over the past 2 days, with one or two exceptions. (look at my other post for details) Dazed and Confused.
     
  3. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    well, those look great. nice and steady. :)

    looks like you are nicely under control, with those meals, in those portions.
     
  4. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    During my testing and experimenting stage, I would allow maybe three to four points higher as long as I returned to my pre meal two hours in.
    But since going into ketosis, I only allow one mmols above during the first hour.
    My spiking time is roughly between 30 minutes and 45 minutes.
    My hypo time is from 3 and a half hours to four hours, if I allowed it to, which I don't!
     
  5. DanteNXS

    DanteNXS Reactive hypoglycemia · Active Member

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    nosher,

    Are you saying that if your pre-meal BG is 85, your 1 hour post meal BG should not be greater than 88?

    Also, how to avoid hypo while asleep? I find that to be my most difficult time.
     
    #65 DanteNXS, Apr 22, 2016 at 7:28 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 22, 2016
  6. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Not exactly, that is too literal. If a food or amount of food went above that three mmols I would avoid or have smaller portion of that food.
    But it all depends on the individual and your tastes.
    If for example it went to four, I would try it again or combine it with some other protein with full fat to see if that would work. It is not an exact science.
    We can guide you but it's what you can tolerate, I can't do grains, starchy carbs, dairy, whole groups of food are sometimes not ate at all.
    I haven't had a potato or rice or white bread in well over two years now. I haven't had dairy most of my life. It's just not worth having! And there is always a low carb alternative.
    That's what the experiment and testing is for.

    I have no experience of having hypos through the night, if I have had them, I was unaware.
    Only when I had real disruption in my sleep, did I suspect low blood levels, but I never did get a hypo reading.
     
  7. DanteNXS

    DanteNXS Reactive hypoglycemia · Active Member

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    Gotcha, and to your point, I also don't get hypo readings during sleep, but I feel quite shaky and strange. So I guess it was an assumption.

    My BG levels go up between 7 to 10 points, but I thought that was normal. I do get back down close to or a bit below my pre meal BG after 2 hours. I eat every 3 hours.

    Thanks for the response.
     
  8. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    @nosher8355 i think you are talking mmol/l units, and @DanteNXS is talking american mg/dL units, yes?

    It is a very important distinction! Remember when i said (think it may have been earlier in this thread) that there are 18 American units in 1 of our mmol/l?

    That means that 10mmol/l British units = 180 mg/dL in America
     
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  9. DanteNXS

    DanteNXS Reactive hypoglycemia · Active Member

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    Brunneria you are correct again and I totally forgot about that. It makes much better sense now.

    Thanks
     
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  10. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Oops, doh!
    My bad, sorry!

    Ok, in American money, if my bloods went up by 54(!) Post prandial. One hour after eating! I would as previous post. If it went up by 72, I would try smaller portion or have some full fat protein as per last post.

    My god, those numbers are huge!!!!!!
     
  11. DanteNXS

    DanteNXS Reactive hypoglycemia · Active Member

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    Quick update: My BP and HR are back to normal levels today. 126/80 & 74. Thank goodness
     
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  12. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Is that in American money or British? (Lol!)
     
  13. DanteNXS

    DanteNXS Reactive hypoglycemia · Active Member

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    No worries mate
     
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  14. DanteNXS

    DanteNXS Reactive hypoglycemia · Active Member

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    Just for the record, I lived in England for 4 years and my oldest son was born there. I enjoyed it very much and go back whenever I can. I also lived in Germany.
     
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