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Help can't get my sugar down

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by luzanmurphy_, Feb 24, 2016.

  1. luzanmurphy_

    luzanmurphy_ Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My sugar is quite high 17.9 before breakfast. two hours after breakfast it was 20.6 and two hours after lunch it was 21.4. Had a small if all bran and handful of cashews for breakfast, and lunch 2 slices of soya and linseed bread with no added sugar peanut butter & half pint semi skimmed milk. Please please help where am I going wrong??
     
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  2. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    Hi :)

    Let me tag @daisy1 as she has some basic information.

    Are you on any medication?
     
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  3. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
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    @luzanmurphy_

    Hello and welcome to the forum :) Here is the information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. To get/keep your blood sugars down you need to keep your carbs low. See lots of advice about carbs in this info below. You don't need to restrict fats in your diet. Ask more questions and someone will be able to help.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find over 150,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates

    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes-and-whole-grains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    LOW CARB PROGRAM:
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/low carb program


    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to bloodglucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  4. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. Are you on any meds yet? What is your weight/BMI and how old are you?
     
  5. luzanmurphy_

    luzanmurphy_ Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi. I'm on medication-Metformin 500mgtwice per day. Have been for 3 weeks. I probably weigh about 54kg. My height is 5'7. I'm 44 years old. I've always been quite slim and have in 6 weeks dropped a dress size from size 12 down to 10, and lost a lot of muscle tone due to immobility. Thanks!
     
    • Hug Hug x 2
  6. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    It may be worth speaking to your doctor about your diagnosis. Some people can be diagnosed with late-onset Type 1 which is initially mistaken for Type 2. I'm not saying this is the case for you, but as you've mentioned weight loss and high sugars it's worth mentioning, if only to rule it out.
     
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  7. Catlady19

    Catlady19 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hiya, welcome to the forum. Are you well at the moment? If I am unwell (eg. colds & coughs) it can push my sugars up and take weeks to come back down. Is this high reading unusual or have you been this high since diagnosis?
     
  8. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. Thanks for the reply. You sound very much like a Late onset T1. Do ask the GP for the two tests i.e. GAD and c-peptide. You should probably ask the GP to add something like Gliclazide to your prescription; it stimulates the pancreas to produce more insulin. I've been down the same route and had to suggest to my useless diabetes GP to add it. He agreed and it did help for a while. If you are T1 then I'm afraid insulin may be needed over the coming months or years but it's not a problem and works. Use your HBa1C each time to track how you are doing.
     
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  9. Helen_S-C

    Helen_S-C Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hi
    I have to agree with azure as your current situation mirrors mine. I was initially diagnosed type 2 but after almost 3 months of bg in the high 20's the diagnosis has changed to late onset type 1. Please speak to your gp, I have been so unwell and if you get checked now hopefully you won't. I started insulin on Tuesday and numbers are dropping but I think it'll take a while before my body feels "normal" again.
    Definitely worth being checked.
     
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  10. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    @daisy1, please can you update the advice you post to include the section on getting antibody tested when first diagnosed type2 which is in the newly diagnosed section? I think it's really important this is included.
     
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  11. Grungysquash

    Grungysquash Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Gidday - I'm only recently dignosed and also started with a DG of 17.5 fasting and hit 25 odd on my second test.

    Your sugar levels will drop with both diet and medication. But it's not overnight it has taken me around 3-4 weeks to bring it down below 10. I'm still to high but am getting closer this morning I'm 6.3 so that's a good start point for the day.

    If your starting at 17 odd you will struggle to lower this during the day but removing all carbs and sugar over time this should drop.
     
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  12. LucySW

    LucySW Type 1.5 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Luzan,

    At the risk of being a real real bore (i've said this twice already today), you don't sound like a Type 2, you sound like a late-onset Type 1. As Azure and Daibell say, do, do press for a GAD antibody test, which will show if you are in fact T 1. Many supposed T2s who keep losing weight and can't get their sugars down are in fact this kind of late-onset T 1. But it's quite a new discovery and many doctors don't know about it.

    Do press for a test. If you are T 1, without the right insulin regime you could get very sick. Not long term damage (that takes longer), but acutely sick / DKA. So do ask forcefully.

    If you're reducing your carbs and your BGs aren't going down, especially if you're losing weight, you're probably not Type 2.

    Update: As I say, it's the GAD antibody test you want to ask for. When this is positive, it shows that someone has antibodies to their own insulin, which means that an autoimmune process is going on - that the body's immune system is attacking its own insulin-producing cells. That's Type 1 diabetes.

    Good luck.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
    #12 LucySW, Feb 27, 2016 at 12:36 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 27, 2016
  13. luzanmurphy_

    luzanmurphy_ Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you to everyone for your sound advice. I'll b booking into the Dr next week.
    Thank you x
     
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