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Hi all, newly diagnosed Type 1

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by Chris1983, Jul 7, 2019.

  1. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Chris1983,
    Welcome to the club.
    As you have noted some foods can really send the bsls rocketing. But it is wonderful the way you have managed on your own to adjust your insulin to reach much better levels than at the start.

    Like @Mel dCP, i follow a very low carb diet, Why?

    Because it has given me the best BSLs of all in 52 years on insulin with minimal hypos. I lost a little weight on the diet, which was beneficial but with judicious addition iof some fat i can regain weight later if need be.

    Yes, it means a different regime to what you might be used to food-wise, but there are very important reasons for you more than me at this stage to have the best bsls with the least ups and downs.

    Of course some doctors are stuck in the now old-fashioned belief that fat is bad. What has been found in fact is that it is too many carbs ( plus in diabetics high bsls and ups and downs in bsl) which are associated with heart and blood vessel troubles. See the Fat Emporer podcats - Dr Paul Mason 1 to 3, (and 4, 5 for interest).

    If you can consistently achieve normal bsls with very little ups and downs with whatever diet and insulin regime - which according to a person * who has been able to achieve this for many years and reversed his diabetes complications is ideally ( and only to be attempted with the full support of your health team) bsls varying between say, 4.5 to 6.4 mmol/l with minimal and only slight hypos - for the next 7 years plus you could be much better off later in life. Of course this is an ideal and a big ask

    Why? You will need to read up on something called the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, either by googling it or there are some references to it on site if you type it into the search box upper right of the Home or Forum page.
    It is not the dcct which refers to blood test units but the DCCT. See what you think and ask questions if you wish.

    The first DCCT results came out too late for me and many others to benefit from the knowledge gained but these days with better understanding of diet, better insulins and other helpful additions to technology the chances of you benefitting are much much better.

    Best Wishes on your journey.
    Please keep an open mind, read, learn, compare and ask whatever questions you need to.
    There is no question so simple or basic that one of us has not asked it somewhere in the world!!
    * Dr Bernstein's Diabetes Solution, book or ebook :):):)
     
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  2. JAT1

    JAT1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Each one of us has a unique metabolism, so while reading and learning from the experiences of others is invaluable, it's crucial to learn about how you react to foods and how much insulin you need. About weight loss, I find that if I go too low in carbs, I lose weight which I don't want to happen because I am already too skinny even though I eat a huge amount of cheese, I just don't metabolize enough of the fat component. I cut out all grain, pasta, rice, potatoes and the like initially because they made my blood sugar spike but when I continued to lose weight I started back with adding just bread to my diet. It took about a month but I am able to correctly (most of the time) bolus for it. I still don't eat any of the other starches. Since adding the bread, I have halted the weight loss completely (hopefully). You have to find out what works for you. This is one thing that makes having Type 1 so interesting - it's another doorway to the deep subconscious mind.
     
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  3. Marie 2

    Marie 2 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    While some type 1’s do low carb, I would have to say most do not. It is a common way to control blood sugars when you are insulin resistant and most type 1’s aren’t. But since you have less carbs some believe it is easier to calculate what amount of insulin you need to take. Be very careful about taking a set amount of insulin and all of a sudden do a low carb meal.

    You said you are a skinny guy and trying to get used to eating less. It is easy to become skinnier when you don’t know you have this disease because you are not actually using the food you eat because you weren’t making insulin to process it. So type 1’s commonly lose weight before diagnosis. Once you get BGs under control with insulin you probably won’t need to eat as much.

    But just because you are type 1 doesn’t mean you have to eat less, and it doesn’t mean you might not be that person that still needs that big plate of food.

    It means you have to learn how to dose for that big plate of food or divide it up into more meals and still learn to dose for it.
     
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    #23 Marie 2, Jul 7, 2019 at 7:18 PM
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2019
  4. Chris1983

    Chris1983 Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you for all your replies guys and gals, this is all very useful information for me. It looks like I've still got a hell of a lot to learn!

    One other question I have: Has insulin caused any of you pain? Ever since I started taking it the muscles in my upper body feel like they're torn. It started off in my arms and hands so the doctor (who said she had never heard of it) switched my long lasting pen out for a different one. Since then my chest hurts quite a bit, its like I've done a session at the gym and pulled the muscles. is this normal?
     
  5. Marie 2

    Marie 2 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    To get more attention for that question, you might start a new thread? There is one or two people I remember asking about pain before and I'm not sure what the answers were. I never had that issue.
     
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  6. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    As a TID not as medical advice or opinion:
    I cannot find a reference that supports that low carb diets are used by TIDs primarily because of insulin resistance.
    And yes, it is acknowledged that large amounts of carbs in a meal tend to raise BSL's adversely and / or increase the risk if hypos later. A hypo can lead to a rebound in BSL ad the liver releases some stored glucose to remedy the low BSL and the threat that low BSL to brain function.
    Such diets are used in TIDs and LADAs on insulin according to the book and forums listed below to accomplish better bsls control and reduce the risk of diabetes comlications in the future. Dr Bernstein,s Diabetes Solution and forums, True Grit Tyoe One and Dr Bernstein's Advocates.

    From these sources the experience of those utilising low carbs diets appears to include weight loss in those overweight but weight loss is not an automatic consequence of undertaking the diet. Weight gain can also be a consequence, which is a boon for some and a problem for others until they adjust the intake of food to maintain a healthy weight.

    On converting to low carb diet, yes, insulin dose have to decrease because without dose adjustment naturally hypos can occur. But low carb diet is actually a low carb, higher protein and fat diet, calories are not restricted or food intake adjusted unless weight loss is needed or weight gain is a problem initially or the excess protein intake affects bsl control adversely.
    For the expected high protein content of the diet some insulin is added in for the rise in bsls which occurs due to protein - as the liver converts spare protein into glucose - a process which usually leads to a slow bsl rise nearer the 3 hours mark or slightly longer.
    As explained in low carb forums and by Dr Bernstein in his book, short acting insulin is not able to deal with the bsl peak of high carb lower fat meals readily ( particulrly carbs from processed foods like breakfast cereal ) without often high doses and risky-for-hypos-later manipulation of the timing of these higher doses before meals.

    There is a study including TID children on very low carb, high protein diets whose growth parameters are recorded as normal and with the best bsl ranges and most minimal hypo occurrences of any study. (Pediatrics May 7, 2018 Management of Type I diabetics with very low carbohyrate diets. Ludwig et al.

    I encourage you to read, absorb, question and ask about the above so that you can reach your own conclusion, preferably based on not just one or two personal stories or opinion's but on a wealth of documented experience backed by scientific rigour.
     
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  7. Marie 2

    Marie 2 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    @kitedoc "I cannot find a reference that supports that low carb diets are used by TIDs primarily because of insulin resistance."

    That is not what I said , this is what I said

    "While some type 1’s do low carb, I would have to say most do not. It is a common way to control blood sugars when you are insulin resistant and most type 1’s aren’t."

    I understand @kitedoc you absolutely avidly love low carb.

    I don't. I love my fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Pasta, potatoes, sprouted bread. But each to his own.
    Whatever route someone chooses that works for them.
     
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    #27 Marie 2, Jul 8, 2019 at 3:31 AM
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2019
  8. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    But if you read about a groups of people on low carb high protein or low carb high fat diets and TIDs under scientific study the adjustment in protein and fat content helps to stabilise, increase or decrease weight without having to resort to increasing carb intake again. And children with TID have been able to achieve normal growth parameters ( e.g. weight and height gain) on very low carb diets without resorting to increased % of carbs in their diet ( Pediatrics May 7, 2018 Management of Type 1 Diabetics on Very Low Carbohydrate Diet , Ludwig et al.
     
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  9. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    i think my statement still stands.
     
  10. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    From lots of reading of boichemistry texts, and education from sources such as Diabetes Australia and equivalent information via Disbetes UK, not as medical advice or opinion:
    my reading about the changes that occur when the body is threatened by lack of insulin include ( to use a quaint quasi-scientific phrase i recall from a biochemistry lecturer years ago) the blood starts to turn into 'sugar and butter' - that is elevated glucose and ketones, the latter being the products of fat, being used as an alternative energy source because the lack of insulin prevents most cells in the body using glucose as fuel.
    Loss of weight is also said to be due to loss of muscle mass as protein is also utilised for energy.
    These changes also affect the balance of various salts in the body, salts which are responsible for things such as muscle contraction and thus balance, heart contractions, blood pressure and so on. Think about all the excess urine passed during the illness phase that allowed stacks of glucose and various salts to be lost from the body.
    Increase in glucose levels can affect the shape of the lenses of the eyes also.
    The reintroduction of insulin, albeit from an external source, leads to a need for the body to readjust - blood sugars and ketones, and the acidic effect of very high levels on the blood decrease, levels of various salts in blod and tissue are rearranged, the brain has to adjust to a return of the lenses of the eyes to their previous shape.
    These changes are thought to explain the symptoms noted during this phase - aches and pains, blurred vision lasting weeks etc.
    As long as bsls and ketones etc remain 'nearer to normal range') and the body intuitively eats food that helps readjust levels of various salts, protein etc and excess glucose is leached out of body tissues e.g. eye lenses, other tissues) the symptons of readjustment settle.
    I hope that shows that what you have experienced so far is a common experience with a known mechanism and that with continued diet and insulin managment things resolve.
     
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  11. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi @Chris1983 and welcome :)
    Personally I think your already doing a grand job, everyone responds differently with diagnosis but your here talking about it and looking for advice and support so you have a great attitude- there’s been some good advice already so not much else I can add except it does get better :)
     
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  12. Chris1983

    Chris1983 Type 1 · Member

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    Hi there, thank you for your reply

    I started injecting into my stomach, while skinny I do have a little beer belly so it's the fattest part of me but over time it's starting to get very sore and tender. In fact, a couple of times inserting the needle has made me jump because of the pain and that's not a great feeling when the needle is already in there.

    Over the weekend I've been injecting into the top of my thigh instead, so far painless but I have noticed a small decrease in how the insulin performs. I'm guessing this is because I'm probably hitting more muscle than actual fat.

    I've not injected anywhere near my arms, chest or shoulders but they all seem to be aching, like I said it feels like I've pulled the muscles. I've spoken to my doctor about it but she said she had never heard of any such reaction but changed my long lasting pen out for a different one anyway. Perhaps it's unrelated and just bad timing, I'm not sure yet
     
  13. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Chris1983 and welcome to this VERY exclusive club :)
    Cheers for the tag Mel
    You seem to be doing very well at the moment, getting your bloods down to a decent level already.
    Some amazing advise has already been given.....going to add that don't forget to rotate your injection sites, they can become sore (as you have found out) and you can get a nice little thing called lipohypertrophy, basically a lump! which will stop your insulin being absorbed so easily (and looks bleeding ugly to boot lol, I know from experience).
     
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  14. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Chris, just a thought, they didn't stick you on a statin at the same time did they? x
     
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  15. Chris1983

    Chris1983 Type 1 · Member

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    @porl69 Yeah the injection site has been an issue for me, for some strange reason it seems to hurt anywhere on the left hand side of my stomach but the right side was ok. Obviously by only utilising one side of my stomach it's halved the space I'm using so it's become bruised and tender. Thigh seems good for now, painless injection and although it doesn't seem to work as well my levels are still good.
    I had a look at injecting into my bum cheek but it looked like it would be awkward to get the needle straight in or back out so I decided against it.


    @KK123 No statins, truth be told I'd never even heard of them until I read about them on here. I'm 36 years old and have never once looked at cholesterol, carbs, sugars or anything like that, it's looking like I'm going to have to learn now though!
     
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  16. Chris1983

    Chris1983 Type 1 · Member

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    I just want to add thank you so much for all your replies, this whole thing has been really daunting to me and it's helping me no end knowing I have people I can talk to about it. It feels like there's actually light at the end of the tunnel.

    This is a great community and I'm glad I found it
     
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  17. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @Chris1983 I am on a pump now so no more jabs BUT I used to use my stomach for bolus left and right side and upper and lower and then for my basal (evening jab) it was in the tops of my legs.
     
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  18. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Here you go ;
    [​IMG]
     
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  19. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Beat me to it RRB :) I had just cut and copied it lol
     
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