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How can I reduce fasting insulin levels

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Lotties, Dec 29, 2019.

  1. Lotties

    Lotties Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I have, in general it seems, steady but raised fasting insulin levels around 6.5mmol/L. Even when not on my prednisolone (forgot it and it has short half-life)
    Obviously, I am looking for ways to reduce fasting glucose to non-diabetic levels.
    I find it easier to stick to a diet regime that has a scientific basis that I can be persuaded by.
    Jason Fung and many others, promote fasting and low-carb but I see no mechanisms proposed (that I understand and hence can evaluate) other than emprical and statistical studies.
    This old article proposes a mechanism, indicating amyloids in the pancreas may disrupt a proposed signalling mechanism between the glucagon and insulin secreting cells in T2D.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2342944/
    The article relates signalling not in biochemical terms but in control theory terms so is a bit different read than average if you aren't familiar.
    It seems to indicate that amyloids are one of the problems and from what i hear is that fasting can help remove these via autophagy, at least in the brain.
    Does anyone know of any, more recent or more relevant scientific papers?
    Lotties' a nerd today ;)
     
  2. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Fasting insulin or glucose?
     
  3. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. I think you are over-thinking it. Just keep the carbs down and see how you go. Fasting blood sugar doesn't mean too much anyway due to the overnight liver dump so go more on your 2 hour meter tests. If you aren't on meds then Metformin will help a little.
     
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  4. Lotties

    Lotties Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Glucose.
     
  5. Lotties

    Lotties Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    You're right, I do over think things often. :) I do worry about low carb affecting my thyroid function as my temps run between 35C-36.3C and I have suffered the symptoms of post-prandial somnabulence (eg falling asleep during or after eating), since my 20's which points to an HPA issue. I read the higher carb side of the fence's concerns with long-term low carb and feel that both position's make compelling arguments. Just trying to prevent myself falling into following something that is not best for my particular circumstance. Been vegan to the apparent detriment of my liver already.
    I'll see if I can get some discussion going with metformin when I see my Rheumatology consultant in Feb.
     
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    #5 Lotties, Dec 29, 2019 at 1:38 PM
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2019
  6. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Time is the best healer for that.. took mine about 6 months of intermittent fasting and ultra low carb to "normalise".
    These days usually in the 4.8-5.5 range used to be 7-9.0 .
     
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  7. Lotties

    Lotties Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Ah! Congrats!
    Have you continued ultra-low carb? What level of carbs can you stand now and were there any thyroid problems (if I may be personal -feel free to ignore)
     
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  8. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Yes now mainly carnivore so even fewer carbs (averaged about 10g per day in 2019 mainly from double cream).
    So far as I know I have no thyroid probs... tests always come back "normal".
     
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  9. Struma

    Struma Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think the term you're after is somnolence.
     
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  10. Cocosilk

    Cocosilk Gestational · Well-Known Member

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    If I eat low carb meals all day (I don't count carbs but I know roughly that if I eat eggs, 1/4 - 1/2 avocado, smoked salmon or bacon & sauerkraut for breakfast, followed by a tea or coffee (black, coconut milk or cream is lower carb than milk of course). And then meat and salad, or lately, pressure cooked meat with bones as a soup, and cheese and nuts (or things like zucchini, carrot (small amount), mushroom fritters made with almond meal) in between, then my fasting is usually under 5.0 mmol, sometimes as low as 4.4 mmol. But the moment I have a few extra carbs again, like I did over the Christmas period, I snuck in a slice of bread, 1/2 a mango, a couple of extra pieces of chocolate, a few corn chips, the next morning my fasting might be up to 5.4 mmol. Still in the good range but much closer to the prediabetic range. It literally happens overnight for me. So if I want a fasting in the 4s, I stick to low carb. You'll get to know your own limits. Some wouldn't tolerate any amount of carrot or milk for example. I can still have little bits for now. I also breastfeeding an almost 8 month old though so that helps burn some of it off I think.
     
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  11. Lotties

    Lotties Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    True. Using a mobile with auto-fill means I'm always correcting something.
    I have only been caught sleeping walking (and talking) once in my life! As a child.
     
  12. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Lottie,

    Having a science degree means I do understand the desire for some scientific studies. However, as human beings have so many variables I have just tried experimenting on myself. I test regularly though not as often as when I first started. When I eat no carb meals often my blood sugar levels go down in the 2 hours after- they might remain the same but never go up if the meal has no carbs. If I have low carb meals the levels may in crease a small amount but never very much. If I eat something with more carbs it goes up. If my initial reading is in the 4s I am sometimes comfortable having a few more carbs than normal but my normal is less than 7 or 8 grams a meal.

    So for me I am. convinced that low carb works for me. I have also lost my asthma which is another welcome side effect. I've had it for a long time and now nothing no symptoms at all. This is at a time of very bad air pollution from all the fires in Australia. I've also lost weight again another good side effect.

    I am hopeful after I lose more weight that my insulin resistance will be less and I will be able to eat more c arbs- what that will mean I haven't even started to articulate to myself- maybe it doesn't mean anything as the levels may ver be at a range to allow me to eat more 'normally'. I don't know.

    Everyone is different so there may not be any studies addressing your specific concerns. If there are I'm sure someone on here will know about them. Good luck, I hope you find what you are looking for.
     
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