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Hubby blood sugar 8.8

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by coleyd, Sep 22, 2019.

  1. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Ok some reading material for your week off to give you some ideas what you can do beyond the 2 biscuit limit

    Can I suggest you take a good look at LCHF ie low carb higher fat (than typically recommended) methods of eating (keto is just a version of this). It’s how an awful lot of us get our blood sugar levels under control and for some even eliminate medications and achieve remission and also reduce or improve complications. It is often the easiest and most sustainable form of weight loss for a type 2 if you need that. Other conditions often improve including but not limited to blood pressure, joint pain, inflammation, PCOS, and despite the dire warnings of the last few decades it improves cholesterol for most, yes improves cholesterol. Some jump right on it others edge their toes in a bit at a time.

    Try clicking these links for more detailed explanations that are well worth readings.

    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/blog/jokalsbeek.401801/ for info including low carb made simple

    And https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/category/success-stories-and-testimonials.43/ to show it really works and for motivation

    and https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/what-have-you-eaten-today.75781/ for food ideas

    also https://www.dietdoctor.com/ for more food ideas and general info of carb content of foods. Excellent site and first port of call for many getting their head round low carb.

    Lots of other websites for recipes out there too. Just use the term low carb or keto with whatever you fancy.

    Also it’s very important to be able to check for yourself what’s happening so you can make the necessary adjustments day to day and meal by meal rather than wait 3, 6 or even 12 months and then have no idea what had what effect. It also helps keep an eye out that any meds are working appropriately not too much or too little. Getting a blood glucose meter is the only way to do this (no matter what contradictory advice you may have heard - it’s usually budget based rather than anything more scientific). Please ask if you want any guidance on this.

    IMPORTANT FOR ANYONE ON MEDS (other than metformin) CONSIDERING LOWERING CARBS: if you lower your carbs then any glucose lowering meds or insulin increasing meds may need to be adjusted accordingly to make sure you aren’t taking more than your new diet requires. It can cause a hypo if you have more gliclazide or insulin etc than your new carb intake requires. This is not relevant for metformin on its own) than your new carb intake requires. Keep a close eye on your numbers and do this with your dr’s knowledge. Please don’t be put off by an ill informed out dated rubbishing of low carb diets or being told you should eat carbs to match meds, it should be the other way around.
     
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  2. Kim Possible

    Kim Possible Type 1 · Expert

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    Interesting observation.
    What do you mean by "vast swathes of the general population"?
     
  3. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    An estimated ~80% of Americans.
     
  4. Kim Possible

    Kim Possible Type 1 · Expert

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    Thank you Jim,
    I would be interested in reading more about this, do you have a reference?
    And perhaps some papers which are not US-focused?
     
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  5. Muneeb

    Muneeb Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Heavy carb meals can raise levels to that extent or even slightly higher in non-diabetics. But you have to ask yourself the question, if its raising to those levels, it is obviously stressing the pancreas more than it needs to, and common sense says to me that's not a good thing in the long term. But I get everyone has a different threshold/perceived acceptance of risk, so it all comes down to the balance of risks.

    As a type 1 diabetic I try and stay under 10 all the time, which is achievable 95% of the time unless I really messed up carb counting or ill etc. So for non-diabetics to go above this can't be 'healthy' considering its almost double the normal blood sugar levels.
     
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  6. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    No I don't have anything to hand right now. Mostly it's stuff I've picked up from videos and podcasts over the years. Obviously it's only an estimate and open to some opinion, but personally I don't think it's very wise to compare one's blood sugars to the person standing next to them just because they haven't been diagnosed with anything. We already know that hyperinsulinemia, metabolic damage and type 2 diabetes can fester for several years or even decades before hyperglycaemia is diagnosed.

    To be clear, I am not trying to alarm the OP, but I am of the opinion that numbers like this are not natural in humans eating an ancestrally compatible diet. Not because of the glucose concentration per se, but because of the large amounts of insulin required to return to homeostasis in individuals who may be slowly but incrementally developing resistance. I believe that hyperinsulinemia is the largest single health crisis currently facing the modern world.

    To summarise, in my opinion only, a glucose concentration of ~9mmol/L is, at the very least, a warning shot across the bow that anyone would be well advised not to ignore.
     
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  7. ziggy_w

    ziggy_w Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  8. Kim Possible

    Kim Possible Type 1 · Expert

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    Thanks @ziggy_w
    It is definitely a worrying statistic.
    I notice the study (which is a significant size) considered multiple metabolic factors including: blood glucose, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, blood pressure, and waist circumference. It is not clear what the spread is over these five factors and how many BG issues. So I think we have to be careful what diabetes related conclusions we draw from this.

    But definitely worrying.
     
  9. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @helensaramay those conditions - including T2DM - are all widely considered to part of metabolic syndrome caused by hyperinsulinemia. Hyperinsulinemia is almost a given in someone who doesn’t have an insulin deficiency but does have elevated blood glucose concentration.
     
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  10. ziggy_w

    ziggy_w Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Definitely agree, @helensaramay. All five are markers of metabolic syndrome, but how many do we need for metabolic derangement? One, three or all five? From a T2 perspective, I definitely would also want to include insulin levels (as elevated insulin might be a driver of most of these in people susceptible to metabolic syndrome and might precede elevated blood glucose by maybe a decade). But as insulin isn't usually measured ...

    Also agree that the numbers from the U.S. are quite scary. Personally, I want to believe it probably isn't quite as bad in most of Europe yet -- but as it stands, we still have nothing to bragg about.
     
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  11. Nimble

    Nimble Type 2 · Member

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  12. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Would be wise to get a bit lower but as you are on insulin you can't go off the deep end with low carbing without reducing your doses of insulin. It is your choice but running high is going to lead to needing more insulin and a greater risk of heart disease and other nasties.
     
  13. Sapien

    Sapien Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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