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Hubby blood sugar 8.8

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by coleyd, Sep 22, 2019.

  1. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    An estimated ~80% of Americans.
     
  2. Muneeb

    Muneeb Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Heavy carb meals can raise levels to that extent or even slightly higher in non-diabetics. But you have to ask yourself the question, if its raising to those levels, it is obviously stressing the pancreas more than it needs to, and common sense says to me that's not a good thing in the long term. But I get everyone has a different threshold/perceived acceptance of risk, so it all comes down to the balance of risks.

    As a type 1 diabetic I try and stay under 10 all the time, which is achievable 95% of the time unless I really messed up carb counting or ill etc. So for non-diabetics to go above this can't be 'healthy' considering its almost double the normal blood sugar levels.
     
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  3. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    No I don't have anything to hand right now. Mostly it's stuff I've picked up from videos and podcasts over the years. Obviously it's only an estimate and open to some opinion, but personally I don't think it's very wise to compare one's blood sugars to the person standing next to them just because they haven't been diagnosed with anything. We already know that hyperinsulinemia, metabolic damage and type 2 diabetes can fester for several years or even decades before hyperglycaemia is diagnosed.

    To be clear, I am not trying to alarm the OP, but I am of the opinion that numbers like this are not natural in humans eating an ancestrally compatible diet. Not because of the glucose concentration per se, but because of the large amounts of insulin required to return to homeostasis in individuals who may be slowly but incrementally developing resistance. I believe that hyperinsulinemia is the largest single health crisis currently facing the modern world.

    To summarise, in my opinion only, a glucose concentration of ~9mmol/L is, at the very least, a warning shot across the bow that anyone would be well advised not to ignore.
     
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  4. ziggy_w

    ziggy_w Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  5. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @helensaramay those conditions - including T2DM - are all widely considered to part of metabolic syndrome caused by hyperinsulinemia. Hyperinsulinemia is almost a given in someone who doesn’t have an insulin deficiency but does have elevated blood glucose concentration.
     
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  6. ziggy_w

    ziggy_w Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Definitely agree, @helensaramay. All five are markers of metabolic syndrome, but how many do we need for metabolic derangement? One, three or all five? From a T2 perspective, I definitely would also want to include insulin levels (as elevated insulin might be a driver of most of these in people susceptible to metabolic syndrome and might precede elevated blood glucose by maybe a decade). But as insulin isn't usually measured ...

    Also agree that the numbers from the U.S. are quite scary. Personally, I want to believe it probably isn't quite as bad in most of Europe yet -- but as it stands, we still have nothing to bragg about.
     
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  7. Nimble

    Nimble Type 2 · Member

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  8. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Would be wise to get a bit lower but as you are on insulin you can't go off the deep end with low carbing without reducing your doses of insulin. It is your choice but running high is going to lead to needing more insulin and a greater risk of heart disease and other nasties.
     
  9. Sapien

    Sapien Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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  10. Myqueeniegirl❤️

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    Well I was told I didn’t have diabetes so I’m quite happily downing my mango juice, what happens! I was sick as early and it turns out it was Hyperglycemia
     
  11. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    "Not true.
    They usually are below that, but can go above 10 under the right circumstances without ever developing diabetes"

    How about 29.8 as my daughter managed to get to the other day. Her doctor repeatedly has told her she is not diabetic.
     
  12. Doireallyneedanams

    Doireallyneedanams · Well-Known Member

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    That’s definitely diabetic..
     
  13. ziggy_w

    ziggy_w Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    How is your daughter doing now, John? This is high.
     
  14. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    She has asked her doctor for an A1c but they but the soonest they can do it isn't till November. Her levels have come down now but non the less are still higher than I like.

    I am pretty sure she is T2 but as she also has iron deficiency anemia I am not sure how accurate an A1c will be.
     
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  15. ziggy_w

    ziggy_w Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Good that her blood sugar levels have come down -- even if not yet to ideal levels. Great that you are staying on top of this.

    I've just googled the effect of iron-deficiency on HbA1c (and fructosamine) tests, as you will probably have done already. So, I won't be telling you anything you don't know already. The effect seems to be that it artificially elevates both HbA1c and fructosamine (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4740944/), so the results would still show diabetes if in fact she is diabetic.

    To be honest, I'm a bit surprised that her doctor is so non-chalant about this -- blood sugar levels of 29.8 mmol for sure aren't normal, even for a one-off spike.

    Keeping my fingers crossed that your daughter will get to see an HCP soon and get the necessary tests done. Hugs to you and your daughter if she turns out to be diagnosed.
     
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    #35 ziggy_w, Oct 25, 2020 at 1:04 PM
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2020
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