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Hypo what number ?

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Ushthetaff, Dec 17, 2019.

  1. Ushthetaff

    Ushthetaff Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi All
    Thought I’d ask a wee question, At what BS reading do you consider yourself to be having a hypo.
    The medical theory at my health authority is anything under 4 is considered a hypo. I agree with this theory but in practice and let’s face it, thats what we as diabetics are interested in , is not always the case. ive been diabetic nearly 40 years and haven’t always been as well controlled as I am now . In the past I could feel hypo above a reading of 5 , whereas now I can walk around not in a full blown eat every piece of chocolate type hypo with a reading of 2.8 , I know I m better controlled now so I believe this does affect hypos ,
    Bearing this in mind the hospital “. Specialists “ in my area want me to keep my Bs between 4and 7 not going to happen , at 4 I’m ok at 3,8 technically a hypo plus I canny drive ,
    I think it’s quite difficult to put a number on it as it can vary . And I appreciate we all should have constant BS but as I said in the start what should and what does aren’t always the same thing,
     
  2. Shannon27

    Shannon27 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Depends on the person really, but the danger zone is typically below 4 for most. For me, 4-6 is where munch is needed, and 5-7 is ideal. 4-5, i would worry about going low before the munch works its way into my system. 5-6, i would still eat but not worry about dropping into hypo zone. 6-7, i wouldn't eat.
    I've had several episodes of unconscious fits in the past due to extended hypo readings, as high as 3.8. So it really does depend on the person.
     
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  3. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I think the issue is that if you are hovering around 4 or lower your body (usually) gives out a warning sign, it may not be saying 'You're hypoing' but more like 'I'm telling you before it's too late, eat something'. Bodies are pretty good at giving us an indication of what's going on before it conks out so I wonder if this is why a hypo is set at below 4 even when technically you might feel and be ok? I have had 2.8s as well and somehow not been aware until I've tested and as far as I know have been functioning enough to be able to have tested and combated it. I, personally do not like to go under 4 because you can easily drop very fast into the 2s or lower. Also it all depends on what level your body likes to operate at, I was non diabetic for over 50 years and for all I know my levels liked to hover around the 5s back then, that definitely seems to be the default number even now on insulin, so now when it goes into the 4s it doesn't like it and gives me a sign. Every non diabetic has differing levels after all so why not with diabetics. The worry of course is that NONE of us know for sure that we're fine in the 3s or whether any insulin we have taken is suddenly going to spring one on us.
     
  4. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Plenty of non diabetics go below 4 when they are fasting, and just feel hungry, with no fear of going lower. The problem for us T1s is that we can go a lot lower than 4, hence the dire warnings by our clinicians. I also remember reading somewhere that T1s who live on a keto diet can and do run much lower levels, because they are running on ketones???

    Personally if I run my levels too low I start losing hypo awareness, and have to run them high (6 to 12) for a while to regain it. And even so my awareness now isn't as good as it was 20 years ago. But I hate and loath hypos and do a lot of work to avoid them...
     
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  5. Shannon27

    Shannon27 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I hate when hypo awareness goes down, i get really worried and have to let mine run a bit high for a while too!
     
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  6. Tanikit

    Tanikit · Newbie

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    I have had hypo unawareness. At one point it was so bad I wouldn't notice even in the 1s (this was many years ago) but now I am on a CGM that alerts me in the 4s and I can mostly prevent going below 3.6 that way. I still don't notice at 3.6 but I suspect my awareness will improve if I can prevent it from going lower for a while.
     
  7. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I was always told that 4 is the floor.....
    I have been hypo unaware for a long time now. My DSN has asked me to try and keep my levels around 8 to try and get some awareness back....thats not working! I tend to start feeling hypo around the low 2s now. Luckily I have the Libre and miaonmiao with alarms set for 4.3 so do get warnings before hitting 4
     
  8. mojo37

    mojo37 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm type 2 but have recently had 2 episodes of feeling really strange and like I was going to pass out and when I tested my bg was 3.4 each time . So for me that is way too low .
     
  9. Bigjay

    Bigjay · Newbie

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    I was told 4 is on the floor as well.i usually get hypo warnings at 6 as mine seems to be higher than i would like.
     
  10. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    DAFNE specifies 3.5 as a true hypo now. If I’m just noodling around at home, I’ll set my rig to keep me in the 3.8-5 (non diabetic) range. If I’m working or driving it’s aimed at 5-6mmol. I can function quite happily in the high threes, and don’t regard it as an issue if I’m on a rest day.
     
  11. Erin

    Erin Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    As the years have gone by (12 diabetes) I cannot tolerate anything under six without feeling a hypo sensation in my chest and the other symptoms; paradoxically I even fall asleep now.; very strange disease. I am sure there are some shart doctors who understand this.
     
  12. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi,

    We are given that "4is the floor." DVLA states, "5 to drive."
    A "hypoglycemic" episode is when the brain waves the "white flag" regarding cognitive recognition & decisive action.

    I personally can function enough to sort myself out in the onesies..? But that's basic instinct. (Been doing it since I was a kid.)

    The problem is the insulin & the variant in the system at the time.. (It isn't smart enough to let it go when the BG levels have depleted enough.) Basal low? Bolus low? A basal can drop me & hold a steady pattern in the 3s or 4s? Bolus? Pending on what it was taken for. (Menu wise.) Can be more random... Go in any direction.

    I've experimented with hypos in my youth. Never needed an ambulance.
    Wouldn't recomend. Keep testing. Manage & treat.. Don't let any blue lights shine in your neighbourhood.
     
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  13. hmcc

    hmcc Type 1 · Member

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    I was told to treat any reading of 4 or under as a hypo. A few years ago I felt ok with readings around 4 now I feel it around 5 and eat right away.
     
  14. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    Not even mine :D
     
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  15. Goma5

    Goma5 Type 1 · Member

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    Great thread- been thinking exactly the same lately. Can’t imagine feeling a 5, I don’t feel anything until sub 4. Seems like the main thing is the cause- ie excersize hypo can be seen off quickly, hypos without excersize have more staying power.
     
  16. captaindave

    captaindave · Member

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    When i'm working ( courier ) I test before starting work, and again around 12 noon, where i am usually around 11 to 12, then i eat my lunch which is most times tuna sarnie on wholemeal bread, and apple and banana,
    Strange thing lately is that within 3 hours of eating i am getting the familiar horrible hypo feeling, and then i stop and test and find i have gone down to between 3.8 to 4.2 ish - so i have a can of coke and some jelly babies...

    I bought a couple of packs of flapjack bars today, and my plan is to eat one at about 1.30 to break up the 3 hour period when i seem to drop BG rapidly ( when working )

    But only been injecting for 3 weeks ( once a day long acting ) so i my body still getting used to it i assume..
     
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