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I HAVE diabetes. I'm not a diabetic.

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Chrispp, Jul 3, 2011.

  1. Chrispp

    Chrispp · Member

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    My wife was unaware that she had diabetes when she was taken seriously ill 11+ years ago aged 47. One day she was just unwell, next a blue light race to hospital thanks the a sharp doctor on a home visit and all hell broke loose there. Major Crisis is putting it mildly, hospital Doc's pulled her back and then straight on to Insulin regime as Type 1 diabetes was the problem. A steep learning curve, but not helped by medical profession and others with the 'diabetic' tag/line.
    Myself I weigh in large build close on 2 metres tall and 118 kg. Life and work style, very active and I work in a very busy industry and have to keep up with youngsters in there 20's and 30's. I lived overseas as a child and have always eaten a pretty darn good meditteranean low fat diet and even more so since my wife was diagnosed with type 1. I've not taken sugar in drinks or on breakfast etc for 44 years and no extra salt, never smoked and low alocohol consumption. Yep, I liked food but still had a pretty darn good diet compared to most Brits and being diagnosed as having type 2 diabetes was a bit of a surprise.
    So, I've had the doctor's and diabetes nurses, with cut out the between meal snacks and choccie bars, cut sugar in drinks, no sweet breakie cereals. All things I've not done in over 40 years! That's it, the truth! But the silly looks and disbelief have been a pain in the ****.
    I'm very anti medication so diet control was my 1st and only choice unless I'm forced to take tablets, the reaction from the medical practitioners was basically, give it a go for a month and then we'll put you on tablets. Do these medico types listen? In my experience and what I've witnessed with my wife, NO, not a lot. My wife had a a hospital eye appointment check up last month. "Why the hell have we got so many diabetics today" came out of the mouth of the senior staff not realising we were sat by the door.
    OK, so I'm now 94 kilos in just a few months, 24 kilos off what I was, all but veggie diet and minimal carbs, I had a few blips re hunger, but with a severe loathing of being pumped with any pills it's been easy and I feel really well and keep good on my sparrow portions of bunny foods and veggies.
    My wife and children know that I have Type 2 diabetes but other family and friends and work associates have no idea. I've told my insurers but that's it, I'm self employed so I don't have any work/employer issues. Learning from my wifes experiences and a friend who is a vegetarian, I made a choice that has worked well for me at this stage. No one bothers as to why my friend does not eat meat and no one bothers that I don't don't do sweet or carbs. I have to eat with my customers quite often and at restaurants, my choice of diet has not been an issue so far, I find that I can keep to my regime with out any trouble. If I publicly wore the 'Diabetic' label I'm sure I would have been spending time explaining what I was eating and doing. People have always accepted that I always drank alochol in moderation no matter what my peers were doing. I keep quiet about my choices and no one really bothers.
    If I could change my GP's and the nurses and other people I feel that would also be beneficial to me and others.
    I'm still the same person I was before being diagnosed, I've not gained another head or become a Martian. Please Note. Treat Diabetes, be it as a condition, illness, suffering or whatever but drop the "Diabetic" tag PLEASE :)
     
  2. ebony321

    ebony321 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm sure people that don't know would probably be surprised that you have diabetes then, you seem to take it all in your stride and sort of get on with it and go..

    It's slightly different for me, as i'm type 1 and use insulin there's a risk of hypoglycaemia which can cause me to need medical assistance, so the people around me need to know i have diabetes and what to do in such an emergency.

    I don't really eat any differently, i just have to be aware of the carbohydrate content of my food and be aware of other food groups that can alter absorption of the carbohydrates so i can dose my insulin accordingly, I've never really been one for alcohol so thats not really and issue, on the occasion i do drink it's spirit and mixer so nobody really notices.

    I'm glad your doing well just through diet, i think it's always a good choice to try control type 2 diabetes with diet and exercise, but of course in some cases even with the strictest diet, it cannot be controlled well so medication is required.

    Ignorance is in all types of professions, not just medicine, it's not the medical profession that can be ignorant or not listen and be very distasteful with unkind words such as you mention, it's down to the person.

    I personally have a fantastic nurse, i am forever singing her praises because she is caring, kind, helpful and always has the time of day for her patients.

    You may not wear 'the diabetic label' But some of us have no choice but to wear diabetes on our sleeves, and just because we do so doesn't mean we get any trouble.

    Many people do not mind being reffered to as 'diabetic' and some people will happily say 'i'm diabetic' It's personal choice. Like you i dislike the term, but i don't take offence if it's spoken to me like that.

    I think many people would prefer it if you didn't change their doctors and nurses, i quite like mine! :)

    Type 2 diabetes is not always brought on by being overweight or having a 'worse diet' than you. There are many people who wouldn't necessarily fit the picture that the media and myths have created surrounding type 2 diabetes.

    Say it however you like, bottom line for me is, i have diabetes, diabetes doesn't have or will ever have me :)
     
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  3. jopar

    jopar · Well-Known Member

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    I’m not sure how you got from ‘diabetes’ or ‘diabetic’ to low carb diets

    But I really couldn’t care two hoots, whether somebody refers to me as a ‘diabetic’ or whether I’m have ‘diabetes’ has I have diabetes so there for I’m a diabetic!

    I never hide it or ware it like a badge I’m happy to tell somebody that I’m a diabetic if the need arises…

    I’m comfortable with it and don’t have a problem with being a diabetic.. It’s niether here or there to me.. Perhaps those who do get offended by which word is used, is uncomfortable with being a diabetic!
     
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  4. Chrispp

    Chrispp · Member

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    Thank's for your replies. My wife has type 1 diabetes as I've said. She kept it pretty much to herself before she retired. She's never once had a hypo issue since she was first diagnosed. I her profession diabetes and other conditions/illnesses are treated as a weakness. Promotion etc often goes out the Window. A senior manager took her aside on return to work and explained that he'd had Type 1 since childhood and that he advised that she kept quiet about it.
    His career had been held back when management knew he had diabetes, he changed jobs and moved to a different area, kept quiet and kept a strict control on his Type 1 and moved up the promotion ladder where others with Diabetes were held back.

    With my wife having had Type 1 for over a decade I really could give a ++++ about it providing I can get on with being me. Sorry, but through my wife and own newish personal experience the medical profession needs a kick in the pants, they may give good advice and care but some of the attitudes need changing.
     
  5. ebony321

    ebony321 · Well-Known Member

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    It's terrible that someone would be held back from promotion because of an illness, personally if the company i worked for made it clear i would not progress because i had diabetes it's not really a company i would wish to work for at all, and wouldn't deserve the hard work and dedication that diabetes can teach you!!

    In the company i am currently working for i have never been held back because i have an illness, there are colleagues who have epilepsy and fibromyalgia, they have never been penalised either. It's basically discrimination to do that based on illness such as it is to hinder someone on age, sex or race. If my line manager spoke to me regarding my diabetes in that way i would find legal help.

    There's no reason why you can't continue to be yourself with any diagnosis. Things change all the time during life, things knock you down and it's hard, but aslong as you get back up then it doesn't matter.

    I agree some people within the medical profession do need a good kick up the bum, but lets remember those who help people treat and cure illness, those who save lives and dedicate their time and knowledge to research into things like diabetes, cancer and other illnesses to improve peoples lives everyday :)

    There are some gem's out there, Hopefully you and your wife will stumble upon one too :)
     
  6. Chrispp

    Chrispp · Member

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    I didn't say it was a company :wink: A very large employer where it is not done openly. But where very many with illnesses/conditions are moved aside.Try proving it and you hit a wall. It's not done openly, but many many people know the truth.
    It's very easy to find other make up other reasons to push people aside and hide that diabetes or other conditions are the real reason, believe it, as it happens all the time. :( I'm elf employed but work in a very dynamic young persons industry. I run with the young pack and my diabetes is not an issue as my clients and their staff have no idea about it. Self employed I work when I want and stop for food when I want. Other's are not so fortunate.
     
  7. Margi

    Margi · Well-Known Member

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    I have been self employed for many, many years. Initially because I was too much of a maverick to toe the line in anyone else's business, but as the years went by I came to realise that no matter what the anti-discrimination rules say, in the real life work place, there are too many ways to circumvent them. I hope I am just being cynical because I have never really put it to the test. I am just aware of the indrawn breaths of any prospective employer if I mention diabetes and Heaven help us if I so much as breathe the word 'bipolar'!! :shock: :shock: There will always an excuse of some kind. Okay, I'll put Mr. Cynic away, I'm probably overreacting.

    Something about the labels occurred to me too. When I hear the term 'person with diabetes', I keep getting a picture of a person lugging a great heavy rucksack with them all the time, or being towed along by the thing on a leash, or worse, holding a great weight out in front of them so they can't stop running without falling over. That is being a 'person with diabetes.' I am diabetic. It is an integral part of my being and I will never be parted from it. I am also Bipolar. I may 'have bipolar affective disorder' (what a mouthful!) but somehow that doesn't feel right. I am me. Am I brunette? Or do I have brown hair? Do we object to being brunette? Or blonde? I am 5ft 6ins tall. Only in France do I 'have' 5ft 6ins (although that would be in metres of course). These are normal parts of the English language and no more define my character than any other description of my physical being does. So how come when we label an illness as part of the person, in the same way that 'brunette' labels their hair colour, we see it as a definition of character? Hmm... just thoughts coming into my head as I type.

    I think the only medical description that makes me what to hang, draw and quarter its inventor is the term 'personality disorder'. If ever a label made an illness sound like the deliberate choice of its sufferer then that term does. Try sitting in a room and being told by a doctor that you have a 'personality disorder'. The doctor, presumably, knows what it means, but little layman me has no idea that it is anything but some part of my personality that I should be able to rectify by being a 'better' person.

    Sorry. At least I can go somewhere close to talking about these things now. I've been smushed for so long and afraid to go near them. Maybe I really am learning to feel again. It's good. If a little scary. Did I say a little? Yes, I think I did. And I think I meant it... :)
     
  8. mehdave

    mehdave Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Nothing wrong with saying your diabetic its just short for saying you have diabetes nothing else :? I will openly tell employers and college etc im diabetic.
     
  9. baby_angel

    baby_angel Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I generally tell people I'm a diabetic, I tend to use the "I have diabetes" line when somebody is being snappy and asking why I'm testing my blood sugar in public and therefore they can see a tiny bit of blood. oh the horror for them -_- (another rant for another day).

    The only time I would have an issue with somebody calling me a "diabetic" was if they used the term in a patronising manner. Yes, I'm diabetic but I certainly don't need to be treated like a china cup that could smash at any moment. As for employers and people, I tell anybody who needs to know that I'm diabetic simply for safety issues. If I drop on a night out I would like somebody with me to know what to do to help. Personally, I think it's all down to personal choice as to what term we use, just as long as the person at the other end of the table knows enough to help for those moments where we hit a bit of a diabetic bump in the road.
     
  10. Osidge

    Osidge Type 2 · Well-Known Member
    Retired Moderator

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    I took early retirement at the end of 2009 but I never had any issue with letting my employers know I had diabetes. I was also promoted after my diagnosis and disclosure. My reasons for letting them know were varied but many around their education. I was a disabled person within the meaning of the Disability Discrimination Act and therefore entitled to be considered for reasonable adjustments such as time off for regular medical appointments. Of course, the main reasonable adjustment was to ensure that when I was at an event we were hosting with corporate hospitality that my dietary requirements were met. I certainly wasn't going to sit there with an empty plate while others stuffed themselves with gateaux or danish pastries!!!
     
  11. ailz

    ailz Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm fat. I found that the best way to get a job was via a temping agency. If I went for interviews I was never/rarely offered the job - seen as stupid if you're fat - but once my work was seen and my attitude to it, I was more often than not offered a permanent job. Peoples' attitudes to the difference in others can cause problems.

    I used to go to a disability day centre and was on the 'User Interview Panel'. One of the questions we asked at one panel was 'what makes us disabled?' (I stopped going to the centre after this one) The answer was Society - personally I think it was the fact that we had mobility issues - but according to the pc brigade it was society's fault for allowing our mobility issues to disable us from taking full part in society.

    Diabetes or diabetic to me is the same idea. I have diabetes 'cos I am diabetic. Spades and shovels (not exact I know). At least since using a wheelchair people no longer tell me I'm fat and should be ashamed of myself - now they tell my carer :lol: - everyone knows that a person in a wheelchair shouldn't be spoken to :roll:

    Ailz
     
  12. Chrispp

    Chrispp · Member

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    Coming back to this subject due to my Doctor check up yesterday. My reluctance to be known as diabetic, tell others that I had diabetes or take medication for type 2. Rattled more than a few cages.
    Since last year I've very radically changed my diet. VERY low carb, now close to vegetarian, haven't had anything sweet since last year.
    I've trade the few sweet thing I ate for hotter chili and curry flavours. Chili fish, chili olives, chili onions and even chilli beetroot and chili dressing on salads. A really radical change and also removed milk from beverages. Only 1 black coffee or black tea daily and plenty of water rather than anything else. Mint tea I'm close to addicted :)
    The doctor had my blood and urine tests back yesterday. The long term blood glucose levels now show me as normal level and as non diabetes :)
    As I was diagnosed as having diabetes I stay diagnosed as having diabetes. Doc has prescribed that I continue to monitor blood glucose over the next six months and then go back and see him for more blood tests. My own regular tests have shown as fine over past few weeks. Compared to two years ago and where I was last year the change is "amazing" according to the doctor. My hate of being labled or being seen as different or whatever just pushed me further in to extreme change in old habits. The medics see it as a positive result, practice diabetes nurse was also shocked by the results. I may be back in six months time.
    A
     
  13. Type1insuliner

    Type1insuliner Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hi there Im going to do diabetes at university. What did you do your essay on? Ive got to do it on how can care of diabetes be improved on a surgical ward. I've got brain fog!

    Lizzie
     
  14. TorqPenderloin

    TorqPenderloin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    This thread is more than 4 years old and the person you quoted hasn't logged in in more than 3 years. I'd be very surprised if you get a response.
     
  15. xAoifex

    xAoifex Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It all depends on your focus! You could talk about variable rate insulin infusions, tight gylcaemic control post op (risks of hypo, hyper glycaemia, effects on wound healing) the self management of people with diabetes pre and post operatively, the effect of pre and post op fasting on blood glucose control. These are just a few suggestions, there really are many many options! (I'm a B7 nurse with post reg diabetes qualification)
     
  16. Type1insuliner

    Type1insuliner Type 1 · Active Member

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    Thanks so much for the ideas.

    I just get so anxious about them, but want to improve my knowledge and become a link nurse at work. I haven't dealt with variable rate infusions. Surprisingly the surgeons and aneasthatists dont put patients on them unless they are poorly, which is right really as they could give risk of infection etc. Tight glyceimic control post op is a good one, as patients are predominantly high post op and doctors are reluctant to administer fast acting insulin to tablet controlled patients. Plus nurses seem so scared and concerned about hypos, but should be more concerned about hypers. Well I think I got my subject ☺ thank you xxx
     
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  17. Type1insuliner

    Type1insuliner Type 1 · Active Member

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    TE="TorqPenderloin, post: 969820, member: 211504"]This thread is more than 4 years old and the person you quoted hasn't logged in in more than 3 years. I'd be very surprised if you get a response.[/QUOTE

    okey doke. Wasnt sure where to post.
     
  18. CapnGrumpy

    CapnGrumpy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Blast! But I only just came up with a witty response.

    "I'm not a person with diabetes, I'm pancreatically challenged."
     
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  19. Celeriac

    Celeriac Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I correct healthcare professionals when they refer to me as a diabetic. I have Type 2 diabetes, I'm still a person, not a disease.

    I don't call myself a diabetic, if I have to explain my dietary choices anywhere I say that I have a carbohydrate intolerance.
     
  20. graj0

    graj0 · Guest

    diabetic
    dʌɪəˈbɛtɪk/
    adjective
    adjective: diabetic
    1. 1.
      having diabetes.
      • relating to or designed to relieve diabetes.
        "a diabetic clinic"
    noun
    noun: diabetic; plural noun: diabetics
    1. 1.
      a person suffering from diabetes.
    It's semantics. It's why we call people who follow the Christian faith . . . . . . . Christians. I don't care what I and other people with diabetes are called, diabetic just seems to give people a clue.
     
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