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Insulin Pump: Pro's and Con's

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by bri281295, Jul 15, 2015.

  1. CarbsRok

    CarbsRok Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Firstly can you write in English please as I don't do text speak, ta :(
    I have been on a pump for about 8 years and on insulin for over 50 years.
    People are given pumps if injections do not work for them and they have made every effort to control their diabetes.
    I had a pump because I was having to many hypo's due to another condition and my quality of life was affected.
     
  2. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    No.. You do not test a lot less on a pump....

    I was testing between 10-17 times a day for 5 years..

    Pumps are not suitable for every type 1. Those that have them need them mainly because like me- I had a driving incident whilst driving.. Many people have severe hypo or loss of hypo awareness no matter how hard we try to keep out of hypoland. Ofhers cannot stop dawn phenomen etc. We try everything we possibly can to maintain good levels.

    You need to make yourself aware of the NICE guidelines...

    What you describe as people with good control isn't the criteria at all... Patients are offered pumps when they have commitment and perseverance to manage their levels on MDI and they still cannot achieve good control...
     
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  3. Nicola M

    Nicola M Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Pumps are great you can program them to give you different amounts of insulin depending on the time of day. For me I get dawn phenomenon and so with the pump I can give more insulin in the dawn hours. It also allows you to be more flexible with what your doing day to day, it's less hassle as set changes are every 3 days. I don't think their are any cons personally to having a pump!
     
  4. bri281295

    bri281295 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you everyone. I'm also curious about attaching your pump to yourself, like does it hurt anymore than what an injection does? How often do you have to change it? Can they easily get infected?
     
  5. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    The pump is not attached to you as such.. You wear it clipped to a bra, on your arm with a holder or on your belt or in a pocket.
    The cannulas (sets) can hurt. Only when they are not put in a comfortable area-just like needles... The sets are either fired in to your skin with a machine that is called an inserter or the metal ones are put in manually just like putting in a injection. Plastic sets can stay in 3 days, metal ones 2 days.

    Yes, they can get infected if unlucky but in 5 years I never had an infection.
     
  6. NowClosed11

    NowClosed11 Type 1 · Guest

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    Interesting...as one of the links on this thread shows the pros and cons to a pump...and one of the pros in less testing ...guess nice should update there page of your saying no true ....they did say that more chance of dka as a con...another reason a pump would not be good for me
    But again...you have answered my question....why dose nice only set that as a mark...why not use this along side injections ....as an option ....if the tec is there why not ..

    Anyway .....I don't see the DNS till new year anyway ..so will prob forget to ask by then anyway .....sorry if ruffled any feathers all ...but that's what a forum is for ....to ask away
     
  7. NowClosed11

    NowClosed11 Type 1 · Guest

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  8. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Thats another reason why pumps -certainly at my hospital
    are not given to persons that have had DKA admittance. DKA admittance can be due to illness and lots of reasons but they are also from patients neglecting their own care ie not injecting....

    NICE are giving patients patients the opportunity of pumps or injections... But the criteria has to be met.

    Its the same for all drugs.. For cancer treatments etc.

    The NHS is strapped for cash so it can only afford to give specific drugs or specific treatments for strict criteria... Look at all the drugs for cancer that are not given because of expense etc.
     
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  9. NowClosed11

    NowClosed11 Type 1 · Guest

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    Removed
     
    #29 NowClosed11, Jul 16, 2015 at 7:43 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 16, 2015
  10. Fayefaye1429

    Fayefaye1429 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My pump is in my handbag because it wire free I love that! I find it just makes me jump with the clip but doesn't hurt. If it does you must change it as soon as possible as it can be a sign it's gone in the wrong place. I find as I have used wire and non wire it's how you live your life and what you need
     
  11. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    This is the topic that was originally posted so please can we help this poster as to the pros and cons of a pump.
     
  12. Fayefaye1429

    Fayefaye1429 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    For me

    Pros-freedom better reading feel better generally cAn although atill a challenge control my sports sugar levels better and period days. I can monitor my sugar better and I have less equipment as the blood glucose monitor is in side it. My one is water proof so it's a lot less hassle for showers and swimming. Plus I find this one is easier with clothes than the wires but each to their own this is the most important part it's what suits you. Change it every 3 days so less marks just make sure you still know you insulin regime in pens as it is just a machine and can go wrong

    Cons- it machine so can breakdown which I have experienced. Personally I don't like the wired ones as I am very clumsy and often got the wire caught on things and also the pump was heavy to carry on my body which is why I prefer my non wired one. More testing and more commitment.(don't bother me really but depends on the person)
     
  13. NowClosed11

    NowClosed11 Type 1 · Guest

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    #33 NowClosed11, Jul 16, 2015 at 8:51 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 16, 2015
  14. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    For me the pros outweigh the cons. I was having nocturnal hypos and found it impossible to control my sugars at night. Removing the long acting insulin (the pump only uses short acting) gave me more control and really improved my life.

    Pros:

    Being able to vary the amount of insulin you receive so that you can cover things like the Dawn Phenomenon or nighttime lows
    Being able to adjust your insulin for exercise
    Feeling better overall as sugars are smoother

    Cons:

    Your sugars can go up very quickly if something goes wrong
    You have to take it off for swimming, etc unless it's waterproof
     
  15. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Can only speak from using the Omnipod Pump.

    On this pump the cannula insertion is automatic, you can feel it going in but I've only found it uncomfortable on two occasions, once was when I first started pumping and I'm sure I positioned the Pod wrongly and it was touching a tendon, muscle or something else as it was sore and had to replace the Pod after a while.

    The Pod has to be changed every 3 days much like infusion sets do, the Pod & PDM alarms when its due to be changed but there is a 8 hour grace period so you don't need to change it straight away (providing you have enough insulin left).

    I'm sure infections are quite rare but can occur, good skin hygiene prior to changing a set or pod will reduce the chances of this occurring.

    Any more questions @bri281295 do feel free to ask.
     
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