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Insulin resistance - does it actually go back to normal?

Discussion in 'Prediabetes' started by worldtraveller, Mar 26, 2019.

  1. worldtraveller

    worldtraveller · Active Member

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    What if, for example, my A1C comes back as non-diabetic. Does this mean that my insulin resistance is not a problem? I am asking this as the ads on TV, internet, etc, say that it can be reversed? True or false?
     
  2. Debandez

    Debandez Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Things like weight loss, improved nutrition, and regular exercise can help your blood glucose levels considerably and can result in a normal a1c. I myself, like many diabetics, have followed a low carb way of eating since diagnosis and as a result have a normal a1c (latest 37). Insulin resistance, prediabetes, and Type 2 diabetes can be managed, and may even be reversed, by the right lifestyle changes. I do believe intermittent fasting can be very beneficial with regard to insulin resistance.
     
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  3. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    I think the answer to your question is a very annoying "maybe or maybe not". For some their insulin resistance improves dramatically into the normal zones, and for some it doesn't.

    Whilst insulin resistance is very common in T2 diabetes, it is also usually present with some other medical and metabolic conditions. Some bodies just work better than others.

    All each of us can do is try to improve as much as we can, in a sustainable manner, and see where that takes us. I'm certainly not trying to be discouraging, but unfortunately in this life there are few guarantees.
     
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  4. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    I think that T2 Diabetes can be reversed but as Cummins & Gerber put it T2 is part of MIRS (Metabolic Insulin Resistance Syndrome) so while we can improve insulin sensitivity over time in my opinion even those with sterling management would still show a measure of insulin resistance.
    In short, to be rid of insulin resistance would equate to being cured in effect and we know there is no cure.
     
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  5. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    From my own testing I'd say it can be improved significantly although as it is rarely tested for its hard to say for sure.
    The last test I had came back as 1.06 (where below 1 is "normal"). The note from the doctor was that this could show the beginning of Insulin resistance but because my other blood numbers were fine there was no cause for undue concern. I took that to mean that as the previous measurement was 1.7 mine had improved but still wasn't in the "normal" range even after extended sub 30 mmol/m HbA1c levels. I think it just takes time. In October I'll probably get another one to see how the carnivore diet has helped.
     
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  6. Spl@

    [email protected] Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I have taken the view that I have a problem with carbs.

    So even though I have brought my 1c comfortably back to well inside normal levels I'm not risking t2 and all its associated complications.

    The changes I have made are life changes, not temporary stop gaps.
    Many of them quite easy in truth as my health has improved so much why would I want to go back.

    Alcohol for example has massive negative effects. As does sadly bread. I found the less carbs I ate the better I felt. Take that to its expected end and its only carbs in nuts and overground veg that I eat.
     
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  7. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Not if you are judging by your A1c alone as this test can hide a multitude of spikes and roller coaster swings, caused by insulin resistance, but that is for a different thread. The correct test is a fasting insulin test but these are not normally available on the NHS. People on this forum have paid for private ones.

    I believe it can be reversed in some people, but should those people relax and start eating carbs again it will surely return. There is no known cure.
     
  8. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I recently scored a HOMA-IR of 0.3 so I consider my insulin sensitivity to be very good. However, that is based on my current lifestyle only. I’m under no illusions as to what it means, and I’m very certain that problems would soon return if I decided to start really testing the theory. Although as I’m never going to do that then I guess it doesn’t actually matter. In the end I have no hyperinsulinemia and no associated symptoms of resistance (such as diabetes). That’s good enough for me. Since life isn’t a carbohydrate eating competition then I’m happy with my current status quo. I consider myself carbohydrate intolerant, but as I choose not to consume it to excess then it’s an undiagnosable moot point.

    It’s also worth remembering that physiological insulin resistance is bound to be a temporary factor for anyone who has been running on endogenous glucose for any length of time and then experiments with exogenous.
     
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  9. Spl@

    [email protected] Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    What if you stop looking at it as an illness. Given the vagaries of nature and the way it works there may well be something we are unaware of that we are benefiting from.

    I certainly had no real k flu problems. The wife (non d) struggled massively to the point we are slowly reducing her carbs.

    We may run better than a non d ever could on fat. Vascular differences maybe.

    T2 is an illness granted and difficult to come to terms with.
    Pre-diabetic. Not so sure. I would bet real money there is likely an upside. Maybe the liver and pancreas are more closely matched. Maybe more efficient (when supplied propperly)

    Could also be the ramblings of a fool but with things like autophagy discovered in our programming?

    Just sayin.
     
  10. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Your point about the differences between non Diabetics and T2s is that when a non Diabetic has a healthy diet i.e lower amount of carbs than the SAD they can in theory switch between using ketones or glucose quite easily. As T2s we cannot use glucose from carbs efficiently but can and do (when in ketosis/fat adapted) use fats as fuel extremely efficiently.
    I think it was Lustig who said that babies and small children having longer overnight fasting times will switch into and out of ketosis easily. We adults, in our wisdom, then feed 'em up on carbs...
     
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  11. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

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    I think you have to look at it as an illness, because even when managed well and markers are maintained below diabetic levels, there is still this broken mechanism there that could erupt, but there does seem to be a benefit and to me the benefit is that for those of us that choose a LC diet or keto style (just applying some commonsense really) we see tremendous improvement in our health. It's a bit like dousing the camp fire with a bucket of water before bed, the fire is out, x-amount of the inflammation is gone, but the coals remain hot. So there is always the potential to re-ignite that inflammation back to higher levels if you repeat the mistakes of the past that led to diabetes.

    I think you're right, we do run more efficiently when supplied properly and as we should of been all along. It's incredibly tragic when you think about diet and how humanity has become this species that is suffering a wide range of chronic diseases that are pretty well linked together because we have been misled into believing we were eating a healthy diet when in reality we have not been. Not even close.
     
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  12. andromache

    andromache · Well-Known Member

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    My feeling (I have no expert knowledge) is that a person can certainly improve his/her insulin sensitivity, with the associated improvements in metabolic health. But (and isn't there always a but?) that does not necessarily mean that he/she can suddenly tolerate the 'old' levels of carbs that caused the trouble in the first place. Not without a swift return to square one, anyway. I do think that low carb is for life, not just for wrestling down the HbA1C to please the docs.
     
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  13. Stephen Lewis

    Stephen Lewis Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My understanding is that insulin sensitivity is actually like an allergy. For an allergy the body's defenses may cause a runny nose and eyes as a protective barrier to say pollen right through to the full and deadly anaphylactic shock of say an allergy to fish. The same occurs with insulin except it is (usually) produced by the body in response to carb levels in the digestive system. For some people no insulin is produced and at the other extreme the body treats the insulin like an allergy and fights to get rid of it. Can an individuals condition be improved? Yes. Can it be cured? From what I have read - not yet. My personal beef is that many pharmaceutical companies prefer to provide symptomatic relief rather than create a cure. Just like allergies there is more money in relieving or preventing symptoms of diabetes than in creating a cure. As stated above keep your carbs very low and perhaps move to ketosis with lots of exercise.
     
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  14. Magz2004

    Magz2004 Type 2 · Member

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    I agree with much of the above commentary. Remission is not cure. But what does it matter? I view carbs as poisonous to the system and while my diet is not perfect I could do the current 800 cal low carb intermittent fasting for ever as it feels so much healthier and more natural. Micheal Mosley’s Fast 800 book features a section on what happened when he deliberately went back to his old lifestyle. Not good. So don’t worry about cure vs remission just find a healthy plan you can make your permanent way of life and feel better.
     
  15. worldtraveller

    worldtraveller · Active Member

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    Very interesting and informative comments above. Thanks! I liked the comparison to the allergy. I’m allergic to walnuts, for example. As long as I stay away from them, I have no problem. I’ll continue my LC diet. I asked the question if diabetics could be reversed only because the ads on tv, internet, etc tells me this. However, I couldn’t find any real concrete information confirming this.
     
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