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Is there ANY bread that I can eat ?

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by JIS, Apr 23, 2013.

  1. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

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    The only bread I can handle is Burgen soya and linseed. It's about 12carbs per slice and makes wonderful toast [very crunchy!]. I've just had a slice with pate for supper
    Hana
     
  2. MCMLXXIII

    MCMLXXIII Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hovis superseeds here at present and no adverse effects.
     
  3. X-entricity

    X-entricity Type 2 · Active Member

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    Make your own bread and you can then see exactly what goes into it. We do this and it doesn't affect me too badly. Potatoes are my worst enemy which is sad becasue I love them. Substitute squash which is a good alternative.
     
  4. Kathleen Mc

    Kathleen Mc Type 1 · Active Member

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    i was told that wholegrain bread was best if you have to have any. avoid any bread that has used wheat flour that has been completely milled, so white, brown or wholemeal are all as bad as one another. i usually have either the burgen linseed loaf or warbutons wholegrain.
     
  5. Yorksman

    Yorksman Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for that tip. You can make flours from many plants and almond flour is popular. Not so well known is tree bark flour adn bread made from it.

    Low in calories and high in fibre!

    I don't think the carbs are digestible at all. Like all bark flours, some are better than others. Here's some pine bark bread:

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Yorksman

    Yorksman Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Try some Thüringer potato dumplings. Excellent with game meats.

    [​IMG]

    Solid potato starch though and a bit of an effort to extract it. Very gently does it if you go for this. You could do permanent damage to your BG meter.
     
  7. EllisB

    EllisB · Well-Known Member

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    Have you tried wholemeal granary? The whole grains slow down digestion, as can what you put on the bread. Spread, meat, salad... all go through with the bread and our gut has to move at the speed of the slowest foodstuff to be digested.

    We discussed testing at my X-Pert session last night. Our long term average, measured by HbA1c is the key reading, not instantaneous BG. A T1 can do something about a high reading, but we cannot and, psychologically, that can be a bad thing. There are many variables that can affect our BG at any given time. If you ate the same food several times, the readings after 2 hours would vary widely.

    According to the DSN teaching the course, only T2's taking a sulfonylurea or DPP-4 inhibitor need to be testing, to avoid hypos. That is why meters and strips are not made available to up diet & lifestyle T2's

    Think about what you were eating before diagnosis and compare that with what you are eating now. What was your HbA1c? It cannot have been particularly high if you are not already on Metformin. When you get your 3 month blood test, the doctors are looking for your 1c to be below target, or at least heading that way, approaching a healthy weight is also good.

    Most of us over-react on diagnosis and severely restrict what we eat. Can we really keep that up for the rest of our lives? 3 months is not a long time in diabetes terms.

    For the record, I concentrated on weight loss and low Sat. Fat (to lower my Cholesterol) and saw a fall in HbA1c from 46 mmol/mol to 40 in the first three months.

    If it is available in your area, I would definitely recommend doing the X-Pert diabetes programme.
     
  8. Yorksman

    Yorksman Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That's right about wholegrains but wholemeal doesn't necessarily mean wholegrain. It is supposed to contain all the parts of a wholegrain but many loaves described as wholemeal are a mixture of wholemeal and refined white. Some strong white flour is required to make the bread rise but in one instance, a loaf described as wholemeal contained only 6% wholemeal flour. 94% was white and then some dye was added.

    A typical wholegrain bread looks something like pumpernickel, where you can identify the whole grains, pick them out with a needle even. Such breads don't rise much at all. Mostly breads are a compromise and some are good, some not so good, but OK if yu don't have too much and others are like spooning sugar into a cup of tea.

    My favourite quote on this subject:

    "For those, then, who are determined to eat bread made from authentic 100 per cent wholemeal … there is precious little alternative but to buy the flour and bake it themselves."

    A wholegrain of truth? Industrial loaf names, claims and contents, http://www.sustainweb.org/publications/?id=266
     
  9. bmorgen

    bmorgen · Active Member

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    Me too - loads of oat bran and steel cut oats, along with nuts and seeds. In the end it is about 40% wholemeal wheat only. Irish soda bread is an easy way to make this kind of bread. Also try the German "brick" breads made from whole rye and whole oat kernals. They are very low GL, so the BG stays fine for me.
     
  10. hobbit

    hobbit Type 1 · Newbie

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    How about some danish loaf.... toasted is better though.... :crazy:
     
  11. waltzingmatilda57

    waltzingmatilda57 · Member

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    My dietician advised me to eat wholegrain bread, not wholemeal, as it has a much lower GI. I'm T2, diagnosed in February, not on any medication, but as my GP doesn't believe in testing unless you're on meds, I have no idea of what it does to my BG! :(
     
  12. EllisB

    EllisB · Well-Known Member

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    I aim for wholemeal AND wholegrain. You can only read that from the ingredients list - Wheat Flour is refined. Whole-wheat flour is not.

    The bran and the wheat germ add fibre and protein that slow absorption, which are key to avoiding BG spikes.
     
  13. johnco

    johnco · Member

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    I am on 500mg. of metformin a day and can enjoy 2 `thick` slices of Greggs Bloomer loaf with Benecol spread plus filling, without going over 7.8. . Personally, I wouldn`t entertain any bread with the husk still in it - it contains all the chemicals the farmer sprayed onto the growing plant! Regards, John.
     
  14. JeanneM

    JeanneM · Newbie

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    Hello there,
    I am Type 2 and have been eating these whole grain breads (in moderation mind you and only for breakfast)without raising my numbers for two years. They are a part of the breakfast for diabetics that my doctor recommended about two years ago. He says that some of the grains help to control blood sugar longer during the day than the pure protein meals. So far, he's been right. My fasting numbers are steadier than they used to be. Hope they help. :)

    Jeanne
     
  15. jassi

    jassi Type 2 · Member

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    Why eat it at all? I've been 2 years or so since diagnosis, diet controlled only and like you, found that bread caused an immediate rise in bs, so I've simply cut it out and find that I neither need it, nor miss it.
     
  16. Sketcher

    Sketcher · Well-Known Member

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    I'm with you, Jassi: who needs bread? I love it, but I also quite like my eyes, feet, kidneys and heart (to live with, not to eat), so the decision is easy - no bread.


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  17. mickey121

    mickey121 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I get the Burgen bread they do 2 varieties a bit dear but there again what is your health worth


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  18. carophie04

    carophie04 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My diabetic nurse suggested Oat bread as being good for diabetics. I get either the Co-op Oat batch loaf or Tescos, Oat loaf.
     
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