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Is weightloss really affective (been doing research)

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Mollyc1995, Apr 3, 2019.

  1. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I believe that is the study which classified 42mmol/mol HbA1c as remission? That is the approximate equivalent of ~7mmol/L average blood glucose. I’d classify that as a number that indicates an inbound diagnosis, rather than remission. But that’s probably drifting somewhat off topic .
     
  2. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    48 mmol/m seems to now be the "official" criteria for "remission" both DiRECT and ViRTA use it.. I think it should be sub 40 but that's just me..
     
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  3. Caeseji

    Caeseji Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That was it! Thank you Dark Horse! I agree with both @Jim Lahey and @bulkbiker is that is a little on the high side hence why I don't consider myself in remission but a work in progress. Better control always brings in more benefits than just lowering numbers, Jim is completely right.
     
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  4. britishpub

    britishpub Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Well it will certainly help, but I think instantly is a slight exaggeration.

    I firmly believe that the rapid weight loss I achieved after diagnosis was a significant aid to me achieving non-diabetic levels.

    But as @Jim Lahey says, it is better better glycemic control is the key to achieving this.
     
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  5. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Sounds like you need to concentrate on getting your blood sugars down and having some success with weight loss. Once you get some successes there you may find that your views on what you want to eat change a bit.
    Do you think you can avoid bread, pasta, and fruit for one month? 30 days isn't a long time so why not try that?
    Meat, fish, eggs, green veg, cheese, cream and a few berries (50g say) maybe for a treat.
    After 30 days you might find your tastes have changed and if, like many, the pounds have started to fall off then you might find you want to carry on.
     
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  6. jpscloud

    jpscloud Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    From my reading so far I believe weight loss is critical but not exclusively so. I'm just learning at the moment but it seems that loss of visceral fat is particularly important and depending on the individual that may or may not equate to significant weight loss.

    Additionally as T2D is usually more to do with insulin resistance, sustainable and lasting weight loss is (I think) only going to be possible in many cases if insulin sensitivity is also improved.

    The right way to go about it for each individual is still open to debate but for me a modest weight loss brought about by a new medication enabled me to explore lower carb eating, now trying low carb/high fat with intermittent fasting.

    Intermittent fasting (again, just my understanding from recent reading and limited experiments) is far and away the most important tool in the box for my particular situation. Combined with low carb, this results in steady weight loss even with my unfortunate lapses (getting fewer and less damaging just at the moment), so weight loss seems to be a happy coincidence in this case rather than the holy grail.

    I've also read a little about sustainable and lasting weight loss, and so far it seems to me that when weight loss is the ultimate and exclusive goal, it is rarely lasting.

    Edit: so any accompanying glucose control and insulin sensitivity may also not be lasting.
     
    #26 jpscloud, Apr 4, 2019 at 10:34 AM
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2019
  7. Mollyc1995

    Mollyc1995 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Since being diagnosed a month ago I’ve lost a stone which I’m so happy about, I do slimming workd which helps a lot with motivation to lose weight....I literally eat pasta, rice and potatoes maybe once a week so not a lot at all, most of the fruits I eat are berries, clementine and apples, again I maybe have 2-3 portions of fruit....and I eat lots of veggies and fish (don’t eat meat) ....

    I haven’t yet lost 10% of my body weight I have another half a stone to lose, and my blood sugar levels have come down quite abit.

    I think I’m just scared of everything (sorry if that sounds silly) I had no symptoms of being diabetic at all, and I don’t want to get heart promblens or other health complications, so getting into remission is so important for me, I certainly wouldn’t give up.
    My dad is t2, and he ate junk food for years, ate the hugest portions, chips nearly everyday and now he’s messed his pancreas that much he is on insulin, I don’t want that at all!, I know what to do is to eat a balanced diet of healthy carbs, fats, protein, but at the same time I don’t want to give up the foods I like occasionally like having pizza with my friends which we do once every 2 months
    I’ve already made a lot of healthier choices like if I really want pasta I do half a cup of wholewheat with half a cup of courgetti spaghetti, I do the same with brown rice - mix cauliflower with it....I’ve used bean pasta which has so much more protein and fibre in - and my blood sugar levels are fine.
     
  8. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    @Mollyc1995 The thing about weight is that high insulin levels in your body encourage weight gain and inhibit weight loss. Insulin is a fat carrying hormone. Eating foods that require large amounts of insulin to cope with them will never aid weight loss. The starchy foods you eat, even only weekly, will raise your insulin levels. If you cut out the pasta, rice and so on you may find your weight drops off.

    Why are you aiming for a 10% weight loss? Is this the only excess weight you are carrying, or will you still be overweight?
     
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  9. Mollyc1995

    Mollyc1995 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    From a lot of articles I’ve read, it’s says most people who lost 10% of their starting weight managed to get into remission...so I’m interested to see what my blood glucose levels would be when I hit that......and I have quite a lot of weight to lost around 6.5 stone now as altogether since joining slimming world I’ve lost 1.5 stone......I’m not even struggling to lose weight either, I’m losing between 1.5 - 2.5 Lbs a week....so that’s why I haven’t given up pasta potatoes rice all together, I just cut back on them and had smaller portions.
     
  10. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    The problem with slimming world and other similar regimes is that once you have lost the weight and go back to "normal" eating it all piles back on (often with a bit more just to make you feel really bad). That's the way repeat business works.
    By following a low carb way of eating for me the pounds fell off and I could maintain that loss because I was always eating the meals I would carry on eating. Blood sugar s also came down too and I found that fasting became easier.
    Your call what to do but weight loss (although it seems hard at the time) is far easier than weight loss maintenance which is where low carb appears to trump the other calorie restriction type methods.
     
  11. Hotpepper20000

    Hotpepper20000 · Well-Known Member

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    I agree. Once I knew I had high blood sugars, I did what I needed to to get them under control and the weight fell off.
    I still have more to loose but my A1C has been under 40 for two years.
     
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  12. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    I believe T2 recovery may well depend on the reduction in insulin resistance rather than beta cells being kick-started. C-peptide tests will typically show that many but not all T2s have excess insulin production whereas T1s will have low insulin. My understanding is that with excess weight the muscle cells become 'blocked' with fat and can't take up insulin but meanwhile the pancreas will still be churning out unusable insulin. The ND is often quoted as saying that reducing fat from the pancreas and liver helps restore normal insulin production but I'm not convinced.
     
  13. Mollyc1995

    Mollyc1995 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I agree that some do put it all on once they’ve lost the weight....but I also know a lot of people who have done it and maintained it for years....as well with slimming world once you reach your target weight you don’t just stop going...you get given advice and a booklet on maintaining the weight and only need to go to get weight once every 6 weeks....and if my blood sugar goes to normal and slimming world works I will most certainly stick to it even after I get to my target weight....but I do agree that people can lose it and put on even more
     
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