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lost my way

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Martinjd, Dec 4, 2018.

  1. Martinjd

    Martinjd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    As the title says I somehow lost my way and am feeling very low, all I probably need is a kick up the ass to get back on track. I was diagnosed type2 in 2016 and did a great job without any medication as my diet was so bad there was plenty of easy ways to improve, I lost three stone and even my doctor was amazed and could hardly believe the improvement in my readings.
    I think this gave me a false sense of security and I maybe subconsciously thought I wasn't diabetic any more, in October 17 I had a heart attack which resulted in three stents in my L.A.D. since then I have taken early retirement, turned back into a couch potato and pilled the pounds back on. I'm due for my bloods to be checked and chat with the diabetic nurse at the end of December, I think I will be told to go on to metformin, which I will be taking along with my ramipril, attorvastatin, bisoprolol, clopidogrel and aspirin.
    I'm really disappointed in myself but I'm determined to get back on track and turn things around, I'm sure when I do I will feel so much better, have more energy and be a much nicer person to be around.
    sorry to witter on but I do feel better now just getting this down.
     
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  2. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Expert
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    Hello @Martinjd Each day is a fresh start, it's easy to be hard on yourself but treat yourself as your best friend would and be kind to yourself. You can improve things as you've already proved, one day at a time though, lots of support here to help guide you back on track, I am tagging @daisy1 as it's best to see this as a fresh start and Daisy will help with information to focus your mind, best wishes J
     
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  3. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    Marking, there's little point in regretting the past. You can't influence it, whereas you can influence the future.

    In terms of your coronary events, who knows if they were in your cards anyway? OK, if you weren't looking after yourself, that wouldn't help for sure, but who knows?

    It's a less than ideal time to be grasping the mettle again, with all these various temptations around, but it's likely advisable to take steady steps anyway, to make things sustainable.

    Are you back to testing your bloods at home? If not, that might be a decent start, so that you can refresh yourself with where your rocket fuel foods are and where you have a bit more flexibility.

    @Martinjd - if you do end up on Metformin or other mess, it may not be forever. Man you folks have taken mess for a while, then been able to reduce or stop them. Some folks even feel strongly that Metformin has beneficial impacts for heart health, but I haven't, personally, done too much in-depth reading on that, for those who have already experienced CVD events to be too robust in commenting.

    Stick around Martin. Peer support can be so beneficial, and as sure as eggs are eggs, I can be definite in saying you're not the only person on here has meandered form the healthier path along the way.

    It's called life.
     
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  4. Martinjd

    Martinjd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the words of wisdom and encouragement, yes I am going to start testing my bloods at home again every morning.
     
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  5. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You have taken the first step by coming back here. I wouldn't bother testing first thing in the morning, you may experience the dawn phenomenon. Much more important to test before you eat and 2 hours after the first bite. That will tell you what your food is doing to you.
     
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  6. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    Many folks find their morning numbers are the last to drop into line, so before and after meals would be a decent start, or if your budget for strips doesn't stretch to that much testing, then to focus on your main meal initially suggestion.

    It's ally helpful to record what you ate/drank to achieve whatever score comes out of it, then you can go back and review things over time.
     
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  7. Phoenix55

    Phoenix55 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    From time to time we all lose our way if we are honest, the important thing is to recognise it and to do something about it. Finding your meter and starting to use it is a good step, next look at what you are eating and start to decrease the length of time you are spending as a couch potato - even if it means less time spent on here finding support. Take it slowly so each planned step becomes embedded into your routine. Welcome back and good luck.
     
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  8. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Well done for making the decision to turn things around, often it is that decision making process that takes the longest time. It shows that you have not been ignoring your condition - you got waylayed by life but now you can set to work improving your life mentally and physically. Again, well done and be assured that you're not alone in this, we'll be rooting for you.
     
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  9. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Hi Martin good move coming to the forum for help and encouragement.
    On diagnosis I wasn’t able to exercise much due to waiting for a foot operation, so my initial success was entirely down to a low carb diet. After I had recovered from the operation and had my HbA1c and weight heading down I felt more energetic and able to exercise. I walk at least half an hour/day now, so I’d say concentrate on the diet first.
     
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  10. Martinjd

    Martinjd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    lemon chicken following a recipe from this site this evening followed by a brisk walk with the dogs so will be testing before and two hours after.
     
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  11. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    On your feet, soldier! :pompous:

    Don’t dwell on yesterday, or tomorrow, focus on today. You can always pull it back with determination and help from everyone on here.

    Best wishes and keep us all posted on your progress :D
     
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  12. Martinjd

    Martinjd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    YES SIR straight away sir
    Thanks Jim for your words of wisdom
     
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  13. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    @Martinjd
    Hello Martin and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you want and someone will help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  14. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    How are things today, Martin? Hopefully you’re feeling more positive already.

    Top tip - if you don’t already have some, then get yourself a set of dumbbells and start doing some mild weight training. Muscles suck up glucose like a sponge when working out with resistance training. Additionally, muscle mass uses more glucose even when you’re not training. This will markedly improve insulin sensitivity. Lifting weights was one of the things that gave me the confidence to fully get off Metformin. I don’t want to be a big guy - my motivation was purely to help lower blood glucose even further, and it worked.

    Also it has allowed me to consume more protein without my fasting numbers creeping up. I don’t workout too hard though, as strenuous exercise can increase glucose in the immediate term. Give it plenty of time and you’ll see small gains in body tone along with more stable blood glucose. Here’s a video that I’ve been using for a few weeks now. It’s been beneficial for me so I thought I’d share it.

    Have a great day!

     
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  15. Martinjd

    Martinjd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Jim
    Yeah feeling better today thanks to the support on here, now I’m a man of leisure I can see myself getting into the cooking side of things and trying to find NICE healthy recipies, the lemon chicken was good yesterday and tonight it’s lamb chops with roasted vegetables but I must try to keep an eye on portion size.
    Thanks for the idea of the dumbbells I will put them on my list to Santa, they are a better idea than the rowing machine I used a handful of times and eventually took to the local tip because it was in the way.
    I’m about to watch the video now.
    Many Thanks Martin
     
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  16. Debandez

    Debandez Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    You have made a great start. And once you see your readings improve you will start feeling so much better again.
     
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