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Low Carb Drinks ?? Confusion

Discussion in 'Low-carb Diet Forum' started by bangkokdiabetic, Feb 14, 2018 at 1:32 AM.

  1. bangkokdiabetic

    bangkokdiabetic Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Now if you look at what Diet Doctor says here https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/drinks You will see that a cup of tea (no milk) has 0 Carbs Iced Tea has 32 carbs now I make my own Iced Tea and the same way I make the Hot tea and pour it over Ice Cubes in a glass 0 carbs . I guess what they meant to say is Commercially made Iced tea can have a sugar/carb content as high as 32. just whish they would be more accurate with their statements it might give me more confidence in their figures.

    Now I know they will say their figure is an average and that its common sense but we are trying to make informed decisions about our diets and deserve better (More accurate info) We are making what in some cases making important decisions based on badly described info not good enough !!
     
  2. hankjam

    hankjam Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It could mean commercially prepared cup of tea = 0, commercially prepared cup of iced tea = 32.
    You have no control over what they do.
    You do when you prepare it yourself. The DD would have no idea how you prepare either form.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  3. rmz80

    rmz80 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    As far as I can remember from long ago trips to USA, iced tea was a sweetened drink that came in a can so I wouldn't be surprised at the carb count. And as I believe Diet Doctor is US based then iced tea will presumably mean something quite different in that context to what it may mean to those who actually make their own tea, iced or otherwise.

    Robbity
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  5. Kailee56

    Kailee56 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Actually, Diet Doctor is based in Sweden

    I’m in Florida, which is part of “the South”. The south has a tradition of sweet tea, which has enough sugar to make your teeth hurt. Don’t even want to guess at the carb count. Regular iced tea from a mix also has sugar, but not as much as the traditional sweet tea. In a restaurant, I have to specify unsweetened ice tea. I have recently found unsweetened instant tea on line, but in the stores all the instant teas have some sweetener in them, at least the last time I looked. My guess is Diet Doctor was referring to purchased ice tea, not regular tea you make yourself and then refrigerate.
     
  6. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I should have probably said heavily US biased - they use net carbs, recipes default to US/imperial units rather than European metric units, they use American terminiology for various food items, we pay (mainly) in dollars for subscriptions/diet plans, etc, membership is at least 50% American, so not much Swedish left in that lot now, I fear. :(

    Robbity
     
  7. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think the units etc were changed when they translated the site from Swedish into US English.
     
  8. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That would be a very watery iced tea drink.

    Why not pour the hot tea into a jug, then put jug in the fridge to chill down, you can then add a couple of ice cubes after you pour the tea in to a glass.
     
  9. Kailee56

    Kailee56 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I agree and find it odd and frustrating. I actually cook using metric and prefer weights. They change weights of pounds and ounces into ml’s and I never know if they goofed and mean mg’s, or if they changed a weight to an approximate volume.

    I also find it odd that Dr Fung’s site is so USA oriented, since he’s Canadian.
     
  10. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Ah - you make the tea twice as strong as when drinking it hot - or even more - then pour it over the ice.
     
    • Optimistic Optimistic x 1
  11. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I prefer my way... :D
     
  12. bangkokdiabetic

    bangkokdiabetic Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    As to watery tea My method was devised on a visit to a Bangkok Bar with a bunch of boozy friends and I had my fill of Coke Zero and was full of Gas My only viable alternative was water so I popped out and bought 25 Earl Grey tea bags (that's Earl not fifty shades of) and gave them to the bar Lady asked her to make me tea and then poured the tea over Ice Cubes thus creating strong tasting Water rather than week tea. the make it in a fug a put it in the fridge method was not available as would be to difficult to negotiate as I do Not speak enough Thai, so I went for the Lipton method (the Thai method was used by my Thai sister in Law who made tea for us and then saved the tea bags in a container so she could reuse them another day talk about weak Tea. Hope this explains my method I did it my way (Courtesy of Frank Sinatra.)
     
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