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Lowering the thermostat....

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by PNJB, Apr 27, 2017.

  1. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    I know Yorkshire people and Inuit who have it even colder. I well remember Inuit in a video on tv years ago with the baby climbing about in the nuddy in an igloo! D.
     
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    #21 lindisfel, Apr 28, 2017 at 1:49 PM
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2017
  2. Enclave

    Enclave Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member
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    as some one without any form of centre heating .. and only a small coal fire in the living room I will be interested in how cold the room needs to be to help T2 .. in the winter the inside of our windows freeze .. so it's quite chilly at times, and my bs numbers were no different than in the summer.. but it is a cold cottage even in the height of summer
     
  3. Fruitella

    Fruitella Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Oh happy days! Remember the early mornings scraping pictures onto the frosted windows before shooting downstairs to get dressed in front of the fire before school.
     
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  4. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    I lived in a cold damp flat like that for 9 years. i had a small 2 bar electric fire in my bedroom, and in the winter I would lean out of bed to switch it on, and leave it on for about half an hour to knock a bit of the chill off before I got out of bed.
    I think central heating is one of mankind's greatest innovations!
     
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  5. Enclave

    Enclave Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member
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    The wife hates central heating .. @Fruitella we still scrape pattens in the ice on the windows @Prem51 we have a little electric bathroom heater that stops the room freezing in the winter .. happy days...
     
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  6. Slalom

    Slalom Type 2 · Member

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    Thanks for the reminder, visitor has left so CH is now off again,
     
  7. Another one here who cannot sleep with the heating on. On the rare occasions we accidentally leave it on overnight, I wake up feeling like I have had a brain transplant. And not in a good way.

    The link says, "However, this research indicates that mild cold and variable temperatures may have a positive effect on our health. Mild cold and warm environments increase metabolism, thereby targeting obesity by counterbalancing excess energy intake." So variable temperature is the trick, not just being cooler. I think we have that covered in Scotland.
     
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  8. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    This study actually makes sense to me. As a T2D I suffer Insulin Resistance, and there are recent studies that suggest that reducing the adipose fat stored round our vital organs has a beneficial effect by reducing IR for T2D. As it happens, the purpose of this fat around the vitals is to protect them, so e,g, when it gets cold, this fat from the brown cells provides energy for heating for our core bits. And if the temp goes too low, then it prompts us to shiver to produce localised heat. All this warming and shivering uses up this visceral fat, and so indirectly would help to reduce IR. That's my theory anyway,

    And not an exercise bike in sight.

    PS my radiators have thermostatic valves fitted, so I only have a central thermostat to protect the boiler So meanypuss here turns the heating off asap since it is costing me £240 a month to run.
     
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  9. We can't win! I read this recently when I was looking into high blood pressure:

    "Blood pressure generally is higher in the winter and lower in the summer. That's because low temperatures cause your blood vessels to narrow — which increases blood pressure because more pressure is needed to force blood through your narrowed veins and arteries."

    I'll just have to keep putting my cardi on and off to be on the safe side.
     
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  10. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You have windows? Luxury! There are fifteen of us living in a shoebox in the middle of the road and all we have eat is a handful of cold gravel!
     
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  11. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    Or conversly. you would appear to have one b***y big window, or is that just an avatar I am looking at?
     
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  12. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    It was cold in the house in those days with floral ice patterns on the windows in the morning, some reckoned their Jerry's froze in 1947! :);)
     
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  13. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    We called them gazunders or po's. Technically I assume you are referring to chamber pots, since to me a jerry is a large container for carrying drinking water or petrol. I remember at school we had to break the ice in the sinks before we could wash, and often the hot water could not get to the sink coz pipes froze.

    More recently I remember cars and lorries stopping on the motorway coz the diesel froze in the tanks. I also remember going by cross channel ferry to school at start of term when the sea had frozen for about a mile from the Belgian coast.
     
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  14. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    Getting off the subject but I thought it was because of the passing resemblence to the German army helmet in ww2? (East Midlands slang term just after war)
     
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  15. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    Obvious connection to make especially in 1947, but it is equally obvious that said 'coalscuttle' helmet shape would be most illsuited to that task. Mechanically the helmet has a domed top, so would wobble the weeble all over the shop.

    Certainly straying into No Man's Land wrt topic of this thread, but is nonetheless diabetes related since the subject of nocturnal micturation affects most of us.
     
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    #35 Oldvatr, May 1, 2017 at 8:57 AM
    Last edited: May 1, 2017
  16. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    Too true! :)
     
  17. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    They were always known as jerrys where I come from. (Lancashire)
     
  18. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    Last year I got soaked through and had to stay in the same clothes in the pouring rain and cold for over 6 hours. Dr google said I had gone past mild hypothermia into moderate hypothermia. I lost 5 pounds almost instantly and put it down to the brown fat cells working. I also had immense cravings for liquorice and salt (possibly my adrenal glands needing help?) I didn't find it helped my insulin resistance after I had recovered though. I have since regained the weight.
     
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  19. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    Interesting that you did not notice any improvement in your IR, I have to ask the question, by what means you use to guage your IR level? I have not seen any home remedy means of measuring this without associated lab checks. In my case, my pancreas is still producing my own insulin, so as my IR level improves, then my body will probably react by reducing the amount of insulin being released, but my bgl may not be affected by this in the short term. I have no means of measuring my insulin levels. All I can measure (rather badly) is my bgl glucose content, and this is only 'reliable' when averaged over a long period.
     
  20. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    I often wonder how people know whether their insulin resistance is good, bad or somewhere in the middle without tests of some sort. I wonder about my own. I have no idea about my own.
     
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