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Midwifery and diabetes

Discussion in 'Jobs and Employment' started by Katemcl, Feb 18, 2019.

  1. Katemcl

    Katemcl · Newbie

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    I’ve had type one diabetes for about 12 years now and I’m just finishing a psychology degree and really want to go into midwifery. However, everyone I speak to says it’s a bad idea because of the shift work? I’m absolutely heartbroken and so confused because I’ve never let my diabetes hold me back and I’d hate for it to ruin something I can see myself loving. I’d love any advice because I’m so stuck.
     
  2. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Have you spoken to T1s about this? What's your dosing regime? (Pump or basal/bolus?) I can see that the stress associated with shift work might make your sugars go up but I don't really see why you shouldn't do it, particularly if you can qualify for some extra help such as a cgm so you can avoid hypos while in the middle of a delivery....

    Googling "t1 diabetes shift work" suggests that there are plenty of people out there doing it successfully, but you do need to feel confident about managing your doses etc.

    Good luck.
     
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  3. Katemcl

    Katemcl · Newbie

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    Im not on the pump but my blood sugars are well controlled and I’ve just chosen to stay on the injection because it seems to work for me! But i’ll have a look in cgms and see if that makes it any easier!! Thank you
     
  4. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi,

    In as few words as possible. Don't be put off, there will be a fair few T1s only too glad you wear the "Tee shirt." :)
     
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  5. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
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    @Katemcl - ask the Royal College of Mursing if there are any barriers. I do not think there are - and a T1 midwife could really help women at an emotional time.
     
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  6. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    @Katemcl - I'm not T1, nor am I a midwife, but to be frank, I'd never make a decision based purely on what some other person said. I'm cussed like that.

    Many T1 folks have commented on shift work, and the associated shift in eating patterns, and therefore some adjustments to insulin being required. Some T1s find that pumping can help them, as they can adjust their protocols for basal requirements on a programmed basis for their various shifts. I'm assuming you're talking earlies, lates and night shifts?

    Of course, all that's very easy for me to say, but I'd urge you not to let T1 or anything else deflect you from your dream without a decent fight. You owe it to yourself. Good on you for having aspirations and ambitions, outside your current comfort zone.
     
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  7. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    From a purely theoretical point of view, if you've got your basal right it shouldn't matter when you eat/work, as you just have your bolus whenever you eat...

    There are a few jobs which really aren't suited to T1s (astronaut, army?) but there are certainly T1 doctors out there, and they must have to do shift work, even if only when they're qualifying.
     
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  8. SimonCrox

    SimonCrox · Well-Known Member

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    One of my patients was an ambulance driver on basal bolus. We kept a log of his shifts initially to show that he managed the job OK (which he did) and no hypos and then he just got on with it. The only special trick was to inject after rather than before food cos of the risk of injecting and then being called away from his food. A very dedicated guy.
    Good luck and best wishes
     
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