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Monitor type 2

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Robray100, May 18, 2019.

  1. Robray100

    Robray100 · Newbie

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    Hi can I ask is it worth buying a monitor to check my own bloods myself. I have been diagnosed type 2 but sadly have little confidence in my GP.
     
  2. welshbunny

    welshbunny Type 2 · Active Member

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    I have always had my own monitor, I just think it gives you more confidence to know exactly how you stand., it was given to me by the hospital when I was first diagnosed? If you start to feel bit strange or light headed you can check your readings, especially if you drive. However I live in Wales and all prescriptions are free, so have all my strips, needles and insulin provided free. Also these are just my thoughts, others may not agree.
     
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  3. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Expert

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    In a word yes.
     
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  4. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Definitely. Your meter is your new best friend. When selecting a meter, check the cost of strips. I use TEE2. Not quite the cheapest but accuracy is key.

    If you really want to get a grip, bank on using 200 per month at first. Testing is not forever.

    If ou phone the supplier, they may throw in the meter for free.
     
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  5. CondorX

    CondorX Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The first thing I did when I got the diagnosis was buy a meter....I went for the Accuchek Mobile which is not cheap to buy or run, but it seemed the best for my use - I am still checking a lot as am new to the diagnosis, but am sure it will reduce as I get more of a grip on the Beast. It has been absolutely invaluable in getting my diet under control so far.
     
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  6. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Hello and welcome to the forum. Tagging @daisy1 for the fab intro post offered to all newcomers.

    Aye, get yourself a meter, it is the number one tool in the box for those with Diabetes. @Rachox has a shedload of tips on the different starter models.
     
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  7. Rachox

    Rachox Other · Type 2 - well controlled. Moderator.
    Staff Member

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    Thanks for the tag @Guzzler :)

    Here’s some info on meters, and to be clear I have no commercial connections with any of the companies mentioned. For a meter with cheap strips go for the Tee2 + found here:

    http://spirit-healthcare.co.uk/product/tee2-plus-blood-glucose-meter/ with the strips found here:

    http://spirit-healthcare.co.uk/product/tee2-testing-strips/


    With more expensive strips is the Caresens Dual which I currently use, this one has the advantage of glucose and ketone testing in one machine, it’s to be found here:

    https://shop.spirit-health.co.uk/collections/caresens-dual


    And to be totally transparent I used to use the SD Code Free which has the cheapest strips available. However I found it to be becoming less and less reliable. Here it is for anyone wanting to give it a go:

    http://homehealth-uk.com/product-category/blood-glucose/blood-glucose-monitor/

    and here for the extra strips

    http://homehealth-uk.com/all-products/sd-codefree-test-strips-to-be-used-only-with-the-sd-monitor/

    There are discount codes if you buy in bulk.

    5 packs 264086

    10 packs 975833


    Don’t forget to check the box that you have diabetes so you can buy VAT free. (for all meters and strips)
     
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  8. Kittycat_7_

    Kittycat_7_ Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I use the Tee2 as well, I'm on insulin so get mine on prescription.
    It's good to know what foods spike you, by testing prior to eating and 2 hours afterwards you will find out what suits you.
    Good luck
     
  9. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    @Robray100
    Hello and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it both interesting and helpful.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 600,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
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  10. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    Definitely yes - it's one of the best tools for learning how to manage your glucose levels and diet.

    Robbity
     
  11. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

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    I consider it essential... it really is that important for many reasons.
     
  12. ShelleyMcD

    ShelleyMcD · Newbie

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    I've been told not to test my sugars the most important thing is to lose weight.
     
  13. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Oh yeah - right - that should solve everything - I had decades of going to the doctor and being told that losing weight would cure everything - including the symptoms of thyroid failure. I tend to get rather sarcastic about that.
    If you get a meter and discover how to keep your blood glucose in the normal range, all the problems associated with high glucose levels should - with any luck - start to fade away. One of the problems is weight gain, for many people.
    In my move back to normal I somehow lost three stone - never realised as I had given up weighing as I was on a cholesterol lowering high carb diet for almost two years before diagnosis, so I put them away along with the little notebook when I reached 264lb. Not long after I was diagnosed and eating low carb, my clothes started to slide south. I was in XXL and now I can wear M.
     
  14. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  15. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

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    Being told not to test is very poor advice imo, but rather typical and completely out of touch with the reality of the condition.
     
  16. ally1

    ally1 Type 2 · Expert

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    My meter is my best friend. It's so worth buying one and buying strips
     
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