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New to this - my first post

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by Odin004, Jun 2, 2017.

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  1. Odin004

    Odin004 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi all,


    I've been T1 about 15 years, and had always managed it quite well - I actually managed to lead an almost "diabetes free" life for most of that time, and many of my friends didn't even know I was diabetic at all.


    Everything changed in June last year, when I had a very bad hypo one evening after I got home from exercise. Luckily my partner was there to call an ambulance; the paramedics arrived and I was okay, but the experience had a lasting effect on me.


    Over the months that followed, I developed an anxiety about taking insulin, and an irrational fear of hypoglycaemia (even if my sugars were high); which meant that I ran my blood sugars much higher than they should be; I also gradually lost about 10kg in weight (which I didn't really have to lose to begin with). Over time, the hypo-related anxiety became a significant and constant health anxiety, in which I became convinced that every little ache or pain was the result of something serious (which as it turns out, wasn't actually the case at all).


    Next week, it will be exactly a year since my hypo, and I think I've only just recently (finally) turned the corner. I've gained back a few kilograms, and my sugars are now under much better control; hopefully I will be able to continue to improve.


    Although the last year has been a bit of a right-off , the important thing for me is to now draw something positive out of the whole experience, and to make up for lost time. I've learned a lot about my condition in the last year, and I've definitely changed my approach to diabetes, diet and lifestyle. The hypo has also caused me to actually deal properly with my diagnosis psychologically, which, strange as it may sound, I don't think I ever really did 15 years ago. The anxiety issues are still ever-present - I don't think they ever do really go away; but in time, and with a conscious effort, I think you can learn to recognise it, live with it, and factor it out of your life.


    I didn't realise it before, but I think connecting with other people facing the same issues, may really help. I've never joined a forum like this, and it occurred to me that I've never really discussed my diabetes with anyone with similar issues; so, a year on, I thought it was time to take that step.


    I'm sure I can learn much from others who've had similar experiences - but I've also learned some valuable lessons myself along the way; and if I can help someone else get through something like this, or any other challenges they may be facing in life, then it will be more than worth it.

     
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  2. Squire Fulwood

    Squire Fulwood Type 2 · Expert

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    Welcome. I am not T1 but I am sure others will be along to chat.
     
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  3. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi @Odin004 and welcome to the forum. I agree that being able to talk to others in a similar situation helps us to cope.
    I'm Type 2 and don't know too much about Type 1, but there are alot of T1s on here, and I expect they will be on here soon, and can give you any advice and support they can.
     
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  4. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Odin004 . Welcome to the forum. A very honest and interesting first post.
    As you will find out from joining a forum like this ( this is the best one ) diabetes, as individual as it is, affects so many people in exactly the same way.
    I've had my share of bad/scary/frightening and interesting hypos. Never affected to your extent thankfully but definitely went through stages of purposely over eating just to avoid that chance I may go hypo, especially through the night, it became obsessive and mentally destructive on a level for me. Luckily I managed to overcome the fear and get back to a sensible approach to life.
    I'm a firm believer that diabetes isn't just a physical condition but an extremely powerful emotional condition and it's greatest strength lies in its ability to take our lives to dark places and not
    let us flourish and be happy. Control that aspect of diabetes and the physical side is a lot easier.
    Again welcome and I'm sure people will benefit greatly from what you have to offer.
     
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  5. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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  6. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    And a Welcome from me too @Odin004 :).
     
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  7. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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  8. Odin004

    Odin004 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all for the very kind welcome - it's good to know there's such a supportive community out there; I can't believe it's taken me only 15 years to find it! Thanks also @therower for your comments - I couldn't agree with you more about diabetes being as much emotional as it is physical. I'm sorry to hear about what you've been through too - and very glad you've managed to get back to a normal life.
     
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  9. leslie10152

    leslie10152 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum. Don't try to do this on your own. You are surrounded by experienced diabetics who are here to assist with your diabetes management. Hypos? Tell me about them fellas!
     
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  10. Odin004

    Odin004 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks @leslie10152 - and likewise, very happy to help if I can. My hypo last year was a turning point for my diabetes. I got home from exercising, and checked my blood sugars as normal - which were 6.3. I took some insulin before my meal, but a few minutes later, started feeling a little strange - not the usual shaking and trembling I'd experienced with "normal" hypos in the past - I just felt a little uneasy/queasy. I checked again, and I was down to 2.2 - a sharp drop in less than 10 minutes. I ran to the kitchen, downed about a litre of orange juice, and had 4 Glucogels - I checked again, and was down to 1.5. I sort of then fell to the floor in a rather undignified manner, and things started going black - at this point, I thought it was all over. My family are doctors, so rushed over, and my partner called an ambulance. I recovered, but things haven't been the same since. A year on, and there still seems to be a mismatch in my mind between the chances of a repeat incident, and the actual likelihood of it happening. On a positive note, I think it takes something like this to fully appreciate the condition, and the risks it carries if not managed properly!
     
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  11. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    @Odin004 Maybe you just got a dodgy injection site? I had a horrible hypo once with a similar quick drop and I believe I possibly nicked a muscle or something.

    I've had diabetes 23 years and that was many years ago and hasn't happened since, so I hope that's some reassurance. It could just have been bad luck,
     
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  12. Odin004

    Odin004 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @azure,

    I suppose that's possible - and I'm sorry to hear you've experienced the same thing. I know that exercise increases the rate at which insulin acts, especially if injected in the vicinity of a muscle that's recently been exercised. I'd done a fair bit of exercise that day (more than usual) and probably also hadn't eaten enough; as you say, it may just have been bad luck, and perhaps a variety of factors happened to come together at once. Very pleased to hear it hasn't happened to you again!
     
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  13. Bon83

    Bon83 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I can relate to everything you say. Not long after diagnosis I had a bad hypo on the walk home from pilates. I got down to 1. Something in the street - I managed to deal with it somehow. I did analyse it and a number of factors came up. I hadn't carb counted (I still don't know how to do it) I didn't consider pilates exercise or the walk there. It really knocked me and I know I run my blood sugars too high to avoid hypos. I carry loads of glucose gels when out running which is probably sensible but overkill. It is always on my mind when exercising. I don't know why but I feel like a hypo requiring an ambulance is some kind of ticking time bomb that has to happen to me eventually. It's crippling sometimes.
     
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  14. leslie10152

    leslie10152 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    When you exercise, make sure you have something with you to counter a hypo. Not everybody you meet will understand what is happening to you. Speed is of the essence. Two trips to the hospital are a good reminder.
     
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  15. Tony337

    Tony337 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello and a thousand welcomes..........
    Things happen that can't be explained in type 1s and it sounds like you were understandably scared.
    To go 15 years without serious incident should be celebrated.
    Please don't forget that but i also understand the anxieties after 43 years myself.
    Fabulous site this full of knowledge, empathy and sometimes sympathy.

    Kindest regards
    Tony
     
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  16. Rakhi_gohil

    Rakhi_gohil Type 1 · Active Member

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    Welcomeeeeeee :)
     
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  17. himtoo

    himtoo Type 1 · Well-Known Member
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    Hi @Odin004
    welcome to the forum !! :)

    the evening / day of that bad hypo --

    a couple of questions for you

    had you also taken your background insulin at that time ?
    what insulin is your background insulin ?
    have a read of these links

    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/lantus-users.67760/

    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/hypo-after-lantus.52342/#post-480900

    I have experienced the bad hypo following a lantus injection.
    if none of this applies to you just ignore me
    but I am really sorry to hear of your struggles this past year- hopefully our great community can help you even more to get back to your best !!
     
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  18. Odin004

    Odin004 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @himtoo,

    Thank you for the kind welcome - in answer to your questions:

    - no, I'd taken my background in the morning - the hypo happened in the evening, after I'd got home from the gym. I take a split dose, so hadn't yet taken my evening dose;

    - at the time, my background insulin was Lantus (had been for 15 years since diagnosis); a few months after this, I changed to Levemir on my consultant's suggestion.

    Thanks for the links; very interesting to read, and I've heard similar things about Lantus. Over the years, like any other T1, I've had many "unexplained" highs and lows, and I'm sure it's quite possible that, at least on a few occasions, it may have had something to do with the Lantus. Sorry to hear you had a bad experience - are you still on Lantus? Thanks for your kind words too - I will also try to help others if I can.
     
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  19. Odin004

    Odin004 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Bon83,

    I completely understand how you must have felt, and am very sorry to hear of your experience; it's very positive that you managed to identify the cause of the hypo in that case. It's a strange thing - once you've had an experience like that, the lasting effect is more routed in anxiety than in diabetes, and it can completely put a stop to anything else in your life. You're absolutely right to take glucose with you when exercising - but have you also considered some kind of CGM? I use the Dexcom G5 - which sets off an alarm if your sugars are going low. It has been a game-changer for me - and for those worried about hypos at night, it's great to know that it'll wake you up if your sugars reach a certain level.
     
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  20. Odin004

    Odin004 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you @Tony337 - wise words, and very grateful to have such support!
     
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