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New to this

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by robchissy, Dec 10, 2018.

  1. robchissy

    robchissy · Newbie

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    Today I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and the thing that made me say WHAT!, was the nurse said she would make an appointment for my feet to be checked, what has my feet got to with this
     
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  2. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Tagging @raisy1 for the welcome pack. Welcome to the forum. This is the best place to learn how to control your T2.

    There is a risk of amputation if you don't look after yourself, as well as other complications.

    Don't panic. Read around the forum and ask questions. You have a lot to learn.

    Can you find out what your HbA1c number is?
     
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  3. T2#Me

    T2#Me · Well-Known Member

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    Others in the forum can explain much better, but in the meantime, don't panic, this is a routine test ordered for newly diagnosed diabetics, to make sure there are no issues with the feet (where diabetes can do a lot of damage) - same thing happened to me.
     
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  4. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Hi and welcome @robchissy
    @daisy1 will be along with the intro pack soon.

    Some people get something called neuropathy in their feet and loose feeling which can lead to infections in the feet if they get injured and you can't feel it. So GP's tend to send people with diabetes to have their foot sensitivity checked just in case.
     
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  5. Mudaiar2625

    Mudaiar2625 · Member

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    Since you are newly diagnosed, checking the feet for possible symptoms of nephropathy/nerve status will be good for you.
     
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  6. Mudaiar2625

    Mudaiar2625 · Member

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    I can understand if % figure is also indicated
     
  7. Mudaiar2625

    Mudaiar2625 · Member

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    sorry, I will learn to be polite, thanks for pointing out
     
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  8. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Apologies @T2#Me: I do didn't mean to cause alarm.
     
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  9. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Peripheral neuropathy and peripheral arterial disease are high risk complications of uncontrolled diabetes, and typically are first symptomatic in the feet. Loss of feeling, extreme pain, diabetic ulcers and ultimately amputation.

    I suffered from neuropathy shortly after being diagnosed and let me tell you...you do not want it, so be happy that you’re having your feet checked :D

    Besides checking that you still have ten toes, it will just be a blind feel test where you have to grunt each time a blunt pointer is touched all over your feet.

    Thankfully my neuropathy has now completely vanished, but it was so painful during my healing process that I wouldn’t wish it on an enemy.
     
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    #9 Jim Lahey, Dec 10, 2018 at 3:10 PM
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2018
  10. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hey Rob,

    Welcome, and I'll tag @daisy1 for the info-sheet.
    Your feet? Well, if your bloodsugars have been high for a long time, two things can happen: the nerves in your extremities could get damaged, (diabetic neuropathy) so they want to check whether you still have enough feeling in your feet, that they're not burning or tingling or anything. And they want to check for ulcers and the like, because wounds in T2's with high bloodsugars don't heal well, and if you get a double whammy of a wound AND no feeling in your feet, it can get out of hand really quick, because you don't feel something's wrong. Doesn't usually happen to people who are just diagnosed, but a long-term diabetic with badly controlled bloodsugars... (Often through no fault of their own) Well, yeah. It can happen. The good bit: this is a standard test they do with all new diabetics and it will be repeated at least once a year, maybe every 6 months. So nothing to immediately worry about, your toes aren't about to fall off or anything. They'll probably also take pictures of the insides of your eyes to check for diabetic retinopathy, little bleeds in your eyeballs which might damage your eyes. (Not to mention checking bloodwork for kidneyfunction and liverfunction, plus cholesterol. Be sure to requests ALL your testresults. If you know where you came from, you know where you're headed!)

    What you can do: Re-learn how to eat. As T2's we don't process glucose out of our bloodstream efficiently anymore, and as it happens, practically all carbohydrates turn to glucose once ingested. So it's not just straight sugar you have to watch out for, but starches too. I don't know how high your HbA1c was at diagnosis, but you might want to start with cutting out bread, pasta, potatoes, rice, fruit (save for berries, avocado and tomatoes), and cereal. Anything wheat-ey is out-ey. With one macronutrient down, you want to up the other two, fats and protein, but especially fats. Fat has two perks: It doesn't raise your bloodsugars, and it mitigates the effects of carbs you do eat. (I lost 25 kilo's eating bacon once or twice a day. Go figure.).

    So what can you eat without raising your BS? Meat, fish, above-ground veggies/leafy greens, extra dark chocolate (yay!), mushrooms, olives, cheese, butter, full fat greek yoghurt, nuts, etc. If you want meal ideas, there's a bunch on this site and even more over on dietdoctor.com, where they tend to be really good at explaining things. But I'm guessing eating eggs with bacon and cheese for breakfast won't be much of a punishment. I know I love it. ;)

    You're probably perscribed medication, and that's all fine, but the thing is... With meds only, diabetes T2 is per definition a progressive disease. Meaning you'll need more meds as it continues, and the risk of complications becomes bigger every year. If you add diet to your treatment regime, T2 can actually be reversed. I have done it, so have quite a few others here. I'm medication free, and have been for 2 years, (Only took meds the first 3 months, and could drop the statins for cholesterol too). I'm still a T2, the moment I eat carbs my bloodsugars rise, but I've been in the non-diabetic range for those two years now, with a HbA1c of 34. I'm a T2 for life, I suppose, but a well-controlled one without medication or insulin, hopefully for the duration.

    Do yourself a favor and get yourself a meter. Check before you eat and 2 hours after the first bite. If your bloods go up more than 2.0 mmol/l, the meal was carbier than you could handle. "Eat to your meter" is a golden rule.

    If you have more questions, shoot!
    Jo
     
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  11. Boo1979

    Boo1979 Other · Well-Known Member

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    Uncontrolled diabetes in particular can compromise a persons circulatary system leading to a narrowing of small (micro vascular) and larger ( macro vascular) blood vessels
    The circulation in our feet can be affected by both micro vascular changes within the foot and macro vascular changes in the legs ( peripheral arterial disease)
    When there is poor circulation, there is often poor healing of wounds, so a combination of compromised circulation and neuropathy is a significant risk factor for the development of a non healing foot wound which, in a very worst case scenario , can lead to amputation
    A diabetic foot check will include a asessment of the strength of the pulses (pedal pulses) in your feet ( usually top of the foot and ankle) using either a hand held doppler machine or by manual palpation, as well as an asessment of the degree of “ protective sensation” ( ie how much you would feel it if you had a wound / stood on something that could puncture the skin) the latter test is done using a nylon fillament with a 5g pressue applied which is applied to various areas of the foot while you close your eyes and report when you feel anything - primitive I know but it works.
    At your first foot check you should also be given advice on moisturising your feet, choice of footwear etc to minimise the risk of skin breaks
     
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    #11 Boo1979, Dec 10, 2018 at 3:24 PM
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2018
  12. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    The blood test that you had to diagnose Diabetes is a raft of tests not just for blood sugar levels. This test includes liver function, kidney function and lipids and your GP may have put other tests on the list. This is because T2 affects a lot of the bodys functions. The foot check is quick and easy and painless. You should also expect an appointment in the post to have eyes specially checked. These tests are part of the routine to see how the condition is affecting us. Be thankful that you are now being given the once over and will be checked periodically to see how you're doing.
     
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  13. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    Welcome to the forum @robchissy. When I went to the DESMOND course (for newly diagnosed diabetics), we were told that diabetics have more sugar in their blood which means it is thicker, and the stickier thicker blood tends to accumulate in the lowest point of gravity in our bodies - ie in our feet. So it usually affects us there first.
     
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  14. Sprocket 2

    Sprocket 2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi!
    I am a few months in now. Don't panic this forum is great for info. Loads to take in but everyone here has been very helpful. Read as much as you can and dont be scared
     
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  15. Mudaiar2625

    Mudaiar2625 · Member

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  16. Mudaiar2625

    Mudaiar2625 · Member

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    Well, for the new comer, there is lot of guidelines. I wish to share some of my experience. In India finding a good diabetic doctor is an herculean task. I was diagnosed 7 years ago,due infection and undergone surgery in reputed Hospital by a very good doctor who was referred by a general physician after about 10 days investigation and failed to spot the spot infected area and reason for infection. Well I recovered fully after bed rest about 6 months.. There after due change in residence location to different state I was just on Metformin500 mg 2tablets one after breakfast and the other after dinner. Now I stated getting tingling /numbness in little finger. Went for HbA1c -10 Started with one more Metformin 500 at Lunch and working on low carbohydrate/literally reduced portion or nil corbohydrate diet and learning to know more about. Will report progress in this forum.
     
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  17. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    It seems like it's not just India where it's hard to find a knowlegdable doc. I'm in the Netherlands, most people here are British... We run into medical proffessionals who don't know about the latest treatments or what to look for, all the time. Considering there's a global diabetes epidemic, that's a sad state of affairs. (Though it is a lot to keep up with, I suppose.) Sometimes you run into someone who's clued in though, and when you do, they're an absolute gem. I got lucky, my GP wants to learn about low carb eating and is following my progress. It's nice to be able to discuss things with someone who takes an interest and would like to implement it in her practice.
     
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  18. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sadly, I think it’s a case of certain influences wishing to continually propagate the confusion and misunderstanding in order to generate profit. No other explanation. We have a space station orbiting the Earth and are preparing to send humans to Mars, but we advise diabetics to eat even more of what caused their condition. No way are we that stupid. It’s not an accident.
     
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  19. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
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    @robchissy
    Hello robchissy and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will help.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  20. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    When I lived there most people were Dutch.. :D
     
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