1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2019 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

New to this.

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Dave Brierley, Dec 13, 2014.

  1. Dave Brierley

    Dave Brierley Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    71
    Trophy Points:
    58
    This is my second post as the first one was in the wrong place, but never mind hey. I'm a 55 year old male and I was diagnosed just yesterday and still a little shocked. I think I've had diabetes for a number of years because I would do diy jobs but not have the energy to put the tools away when I had done, I used to joke and tell everyone that I was zausted, but when I had to drink more and wee more and started loosing weightI had an idea of what it was and was correct, my wife managers a nursing home and took a water sample to work and tested it, she found a high amount of glucose in it and said you need to see a Doctor for a blood test.

    My fasting blood glucose level is 79 the Doc says average is about 45 and I wonder what the difference is between the numbers, some say their glucose level is 5.5 or 6, so I don't know what to say, is one mol/l?

    I'm now taking Metformin and although my cholesterol was low the Doctor prescribed me Astovastatin she did say why but i was suffering information overload by then.

    I find the forum really good and have spent all eve looking through diets and other stuff.

    Thanks for reading.

    Dave
     
    • Like Like x 2
  2. NoCrbs4Me

    NoCrbs4Me I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,700
    Likes Received:
    9,100
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Welcome! Yes, it's a lot to take in. A few of points:
    1. Get a copy of your lab results. That will really help when you are asking questions on the forum and doing your own research online. Your surgery will print one for you.
    2. The 79 is most likely NOT your fasting test result, but more likely your HbA1c result. 79 mmol/mol is quite high.
    3. Get a personal blood glucose meter. You need to monitor what foods cause your blood glucose to spike and reduce or eliminate them from your diet.
    4. Your doctor prescribed a statin most likely because the official protocols call for lower cholesterol levels for diabetics than nondiabetics. It would be useful to have your lab results for this.
    5. Consider a low carb/high fat diet. For me, this lowered my blood glucose, lowered my weight, lowered my blood pressure, and improved my cholesterol numbers.
    6. Personally, I found this site the most useful starting point with respect to type 2 diabetes: http://www.phlaunt.com/
    7. Good luck and keep coming back to this forum.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  3. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    26,459
    Likes Received:
    4,871
    Trophy Points:
    248
    @Dave Brierley

    Hello Dave and welcome to the forum :)

    Here is the information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you need to and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find over 130,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates

    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes-and-whole-grains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to bloodglucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  4. Andy12345

    Andy12345 Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    6,342
    Likes Received:
    8,378
    Trophy Points:
    178
    • Like Like x 8
  5. Clivethedrive

    Clivethedrive Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,837
    Likes Received:
    18,307
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Welcome to the forum Dave brieley:))
     
  6. Dave Brierley

    Dave Brierley Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    71
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Hi and thank for the help, looks like I have more reading to do, again thanks for your help everyone.

    dave
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. Patricia21

    Patricia21 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,764
    Likes Received:
    6,896
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Welcome Dave.
    you are in good hands on this forum.
    I know more about diabetes now than my nurse does.and all the advice I have had from the forum has worked for me.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  8. Snowy12

    Snowy12 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    939
    Likes Received:
    1,731
    Trophy Points:
    178
    image.jpg Dave To The Forum.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  9. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

    Messages:
    24,485
    Likes Received:
    30,240
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi and welcome to the forum.

    Some great advice already, and I can't add any more at this time. You need a bit of space to breathe deeply and take it all in.

    As for statins, it is normal for GP's to prescribe statins to diabetics, whether their cholesterol is high or otherwise. You will need to decide for yourself whether to take them once you know what your lipids were - the full breakdown of cholesterol, HDL. LDL and most importantly, your triglycerides.

    Do keep posting, and ask questions.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  10. sanguine

    sanguine Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,341
    Likes Received:
    9,633
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Hi Dave, welcome. Cholesterol low but your GP still prescribed statins :banghead:. I would like to know her reasons if you can ask her next time you speak. You might like to read http://www.amazon.co.uk/Great-Chole...18572599&sr=1-1&keywords=kendrick+cholesterol sometime.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  11. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

    Messages:
    10,690
    Likes Received:
    6,674
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi and welcome. Yes, ask the GP to justify the statins. They are not necessary unless your readings are high or you have a family history of heart conditions.
     
  12. Patricia21

    Patricia21 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,764
    Likes Received:
    6,896
    Trophy Points:
    178
    The nurse who is not a diabetic nurse wanted me to have satins my LDL was 2.5 I refused ,with going on the LCHF diet it has gone down to 2 in three months.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  13. Sid Bonkers

    Sid Bonkers Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,978
    Likes Received:
    1,113
    Trophy Points:
    178

    Well thats one way Andy but personally I prefer the advice given out by the forum which is posted to the newly diagnosed usually by Daisy.

    Not everyone wants to eat such a restrictive diet :)
     
    • Like Like x 4
  14. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    9,027
    Likes Received:
    15,358
    Trophy Points:
    198
    It's good to have a choice though, don't you think Sid? Daisy's advice is already on this thread and now Dave has the choice of LCHF too. It's up to him to decide which advice he follows.

    LCHF is only restrictive if you keep focussing on what you can't eat, if you look at all the nutritious foods you can eat, then it's much easier to follow.

    Personally I prefer to stay off drugs for as long as possible. Not everyone wants to eat the carbs and take the drugs to compensate. Just my own opinion.
     
    • Like Like x 6
  15. dannyw

    dannyw Type 1 · BANNED

    Messages:
    431
    Likes Received:
    1,239
    Trophy Points:
    158
  16. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    Could we get back to helping the OP rather than debate the best information.
    The OP has just been diagnosed, and has to assimilate all the information available. Given time and helping him with any questions he may have is the best way forward.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  17. Enclave

    Enclave Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    2,602
    Likes Received:
    4,614
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Hi Dave, welcome to the forums .. I think our diet choices may differ from personal experience.. But we all should aggree that you will need to get your own meter .. Homehealth are the cheapest for test strips, so most of us T2's get a Codefree meter from homehealth .. If your going to .. Then hang on and I will fish out the discount code for their test strips.
    Remember .. If you don't test you won't know what's affecting your BS .. If you do test you can be proactive in controlling your blood sugars
     
  18. alliebee

    alliebee · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,486
    Likes Received:
    6,464
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Hi Dave welcome from me too :)
     
  19. Sid Bonkers

    Sid Bonkers Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,978
    Likes Received:
    1,113
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Who takes drugs to compensate for the carbs they eat zand? removed personal comments.

    For the record I take two metformin a day although quite what it has to do with anyone except me and my doctor I have no idea, unless you are insinuating that you are somehow better than those less fortunate who have to take regular medication for no fault of their own, is that it?
     
    #19 Sid Bonkers, Dec 15, 2014 at 1:19 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 15, 2014
  20. alliebee

    alliebee · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,486
    Likes Received:
    6,464
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Hey Sid that's a bit unecessary in front of Dave, a new member, who is asking for advice?
     
    • Like Like x 2
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook