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Newly diagnosed but confused by the diabetic nurse

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by JackieCarroll, Aug 24, 2017.

  1. Heretic1

    Heretic1 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I think it harsh to describe the NHS as 'cheapskates'. I'm sure it hasn't escaped everyone's attention that the NHS is under severe pressure and needs to put its resources where the NEED is most, which means hard decisions are having to be made. The principle of 'free at the point of need' I feel still endures. In an ideal world, under the original remit of the NHS glasses, dentists, prescriptions were all free ..... but we no longer live in utopian ideal world.

    It would be 'ideal' if all T2Ds - who wanted (but not necessarily clinically needed to) were offered BG monitoring... but we don't live in thst ideal world. I fully concur those at risk of hypoglycaemia inducing medication 'clinically' need to monitor their and levels, and quite rightly for those who absolutely need it, it is provided, but for the rest of us it is a nice to have / desirable, not essential. For many months after being 'labelled' I followed all the 'good' advice (which is mostly the good living common sense I had ignored for years) offered by the NHS, and in here and by following it quickly turned the situation (and my life) around and all of my levels are now in the non diabetes range. I was not provided with nor did I monitor my BG outside of routine appointments - but I did it. I now declare my hand, that earlier this year I finally indulged and opted to check my BG levels and do so only a couple of times a day (sometimes not at all) and it has provided a degree of reassurance that I continue to do the right thing, and surprised me as to the flexibility of what I can eat safely ...... But that was a choice I made - so why should I expect an already resource strapped NHS to pay for this. I don't.... my choice, my cost.

    A number of years ago I was told I had border line high BP. At that time I dashed out and bought a BP machine, which I used for a while (but then gathered dust for a long while!). The NHS did not suggest then, nor does it now that anyone diagnosed with high BP should test their levels at home or provide machines to do so ..... It is not a clinical need!

    As above it would be nice to be provided with these things free, but consider myself to be s pragmatist, and realist. As and when (or if) I clinically need to be provided with BG monitoring I know it will be there ... until then I accept I need to buy it as a consumer, not a patient!
     
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  2. Heretic1

    Heretic1 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Yes there is ..... Accu check mobile. Single monitor, internal cassette, with a finger pricked attached to the machine. No separate strips or lancets etc. Not as cheap as some of the others, but definately more convenient.
     
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  3. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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    Not really.. there are no essential carbs.. you can eat lots of other yummy stuff instead.
     
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  4. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The strip come in the cassettes. They are internal, not non existant. So an accucheck mobile does require test strips, via the cassette.
     
  5. Chook

    Chook Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello - yes, NHS GPs do ask people diagnosed with high BP to buy a BP machine and test at home - at least they do here in Yorkshire. I was given a computer print out recommending various machines and telling me how to test. You are asked to test morning and evening on two days of the week - I test on Tuesdays and Fridays.

    I consider myself lucky that I could afford to buy BP machine but I do know of other people who are on very low incomes who can't afford to buy a machine to monitor their BP this way after having been told to do so.
     
  6. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    I apologise for my clumsy reply. I shouldn't have quoted your post .I don't know why I did! I was replying to @JackieCarroll . I was simply trying to warn her that her husband's diet may not be suitable for her. I wasn't in any way suggesting your response was wrong. You are spot on that a low carb diet is a wise choice for insulin dependant diabetics just as it is for the rest of us. We all have a lot to learn. The more I learn the less I know! :)
     
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  7. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    @JackieCarroll

    Hello Jackie and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it helpful. Ask as many questions as you want and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 250,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.

    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. They're all free.
    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why
    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  8. JackieCarroll

    JackieCarroll Type 2 · Active Member

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    Woweeee just checked the price of cassettes - way too much for me!!

    Thank you all for your help, I will look into getting a meter this weekend

    Sent from my SM-A320FL using Diabetes.co.uk Forum mobile app
     
  9. JackieCarroll

    JackieCarroll Type 2 · Active Member

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    Thank you Daisy - awesome!

    Sent from my SM-A320FL using Diabetes.co.uk Forum mobile app
     
  10. pensionistamike

    pensionistamike Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I use Codefree Meter and strips......I always get the 5 Pack with discount as I have to test 3 times a day.
    I often wonder why if they can do the strips for the price that they do why cant the other manufacturers do
    the same as they all presumably have the same purpose.....Curious....
     
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  11. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    They don't prescribe test strips. You are supposed to control your BG without knowing what it is. Insane is the only word for it.
     
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  12. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Good advice.
     
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  13. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    NHS doublespeak is meant to soften us up. We are no longer patients. We are Customers. This BS must be challenged. In my local hospital, the toilets are maintained by the 'Hotel Services Department'. Under funding the NHS is a political decision.
     
  14. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Been low caring for two years. Lost weight. Feel fine.
     
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  15. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The NHS found that when they gave free test scripts to people with Type2 it was of no benefit, as most people just wrote the numbers in a book and took no action. People who pay for test scripts and test before/2hr after meals to learn what they should not eat get great benefit.

    Test strips without "engagement" does not result in better BG control, and the NHS never taught people who to use the test strips as a learning tool.

    Type2 who take insulin greatly reduce the length of their life compared to someone who controls their BG with diet, there any many people coming off all insulin once they stop eating carbs and/or "intermittent fasting" and/or lose a lot of weight with a very low cal diet (Newcastle Diet).
     
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  16. Chook

    Chook Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think that maybe they would get better results when prescribing meter and strips if they were to explain to the patients how they can learn from their test results. They dont do this at all - all they do is give you the meter and strips and tell you to keep a diary of the test results which you take to show the DN at your review. What happens then (because invariably the BG has risen) is the DN gives you a bit of an ear bending about not trying to lose weight to reduce your BG by following the Eatwell diet sheet she gave you when you were first diagnosed. I

    When I talked this over with my DN she said she'd never heard of anyone using their meter the same way we do.

    If, at first diagnosis, they were to have given me an option to either a) take the pills/eat their diet and have my diabetes get progressively worse or b) take half an hour out of their busy day to explain our use of the meter combined with a low carb diet, I know exactly which is choose.
     
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  17. Nicksu

    Nicksu Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    In that case what happened to the old adage "the customer is always right". (Sorry - forgive the sarcasm!)
     
  18. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Was is sarcasm.
     
  19. pensionistamike

    pensionistamike Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Will we ever be told the Real Truth as to where the NHS money has gone / is going.....I doubt it.
     
  20. Chook

    Chook Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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