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Newly diagnosed type 2 - have cried the entire weekend.

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Jaz006, Jun 3, 2018.

  1. Jaz006

    Jaz006 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi

    I don't really know what to write. I was diagnosed type 2 at 5pm on Friday night by the Gp as my blood results came back. (I have been feeling faint, look pale and have cold feet).

    Anyway I am extremely sad. I am confused by all the websites and what is good and not good to eat.

    I really need to stop crying and get a grip because no one has died and I know I will be alright. I guess I dont like having a label. I am overweight so maybe it's my just desserts? I am totally heartbroken, scared and emotional.
     
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  2. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Hi Jaz, take a deep breath. You’ve come to the right place. This brilliant little corner of the internet for us Type 2s. First let me tag in @daisy1 for her useful welcome post which is full of info. I was in your position just over a year ago and still remember how shell shocked I felt. Firstly please don’t blame yourself, there a lot of overweight people walking around who don’t have diabetes so don’t beat yourself up about this. I maintain non diabetic blood sugars now and I’ve lost nearly six stone in a year, I’ve done this with the help of the lovely people here on the Forum, who advised low carb eating, self monitoring plus I was prescribed Metformin.
    Do you know your blood test numbers and have you been started on any medication? If you can give us a bit more info we can start to help you.
     
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  3. NewTD2

    NewTD2 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hope this helps
    https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb
     
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  4. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    The first thing you should do is stop blaming yourself. Insulin resistance often happens a few years before T2 is diagnosed. Insulin resistance causes weight gain. It isn't your fault.

    Stick with us, you will soon be on the right track :)
     
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  5. jayney27

    jayney27 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hello and welcome,
    Can I just say this could have been my first post, I was diagnosed in October last year, it was a complete shock as I hadn’t had any of the typical diabetic symptoms and didn’t feel unwell. I cried at my first appointment with the diabetic nurse, I was so sad, annoyed, angry, you name the emotion I felt it.
    However I also discovered this site, it has been my saviour, there are so many helpful and friendly people here, everyone has been where you are. Don’t worry things will settle down. You need some time to grieve but also to realise you have been handed a wonderful opportunity to make some changes that will make a positive difference to your health and well being.
    I was (and still am) overweight but cannot tell you how much progress I have made. I’m 4 stone lighter and on my way to hopefully putting my diabetes into remission. I have achieved this by adopting a low carb high fat approach to diet and increasing my activity, not by a lot, just a bit more walking, at a brisker pace and some swimming. There are still days when I wish this was all a bad dream but I can honestly say I have never looked or felt better, I don’t think that would be the case had I not been diagnosed with diabetes.
    Ask questions here, no question is silly and someone will be able to point you in the right direction. We are all different and have different experiences and approaches to controlling this condition so you may gets lots of different answers, however that in my opinion is good, it gives you options, read what people say and make your own informed choices.
    Take each day as it comes, be prepared to have good and bad days but hopefully you will see some fairly quick positives if you are willing to put in the work and that in itself will be your motivation.
    Pretty soon others will pop up with advise, support and encouragement so don’t panic, you are not alone and everyone will be willing you on. Good luck.
     
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  6. kevinfitzgerald

    kevinfitzgerald Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello Jaz.. A massive welcome to the Forum and an incredible supportive community right here.

    It is a huge shock to be diagnosed with this condition. Everything you state you are feeling right now is totally normal so I would think a good cry can only be productive so please don't worry about that.

    It can be totally overwhelming coming to terms with a chronic diagnosis but you will soon realise after a while on here that we all support one another and you will see that you will be able to live a full and long active life by the responses you will receive here.

    Please ask as many questions as you need to and there will be many responses from other Type 2's to help get you started.

    Keep close and you will be ok. You may not feel like that now but the fact you have shared your first post so openly shows that you want the support and knowledge to be fully on board living with this.

    Welcome once more Jaz. As stated, keep close by and all the support you need will be provided.
     
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  7. There is no Spoon

    There is no Spoon I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Jaz,
    Diabetes is a genetic condition weight does not help but it is not the cause.
    There are plenty of fat people who are not diabetic and plenty of slim people who are.
    So don't beat yourself up over this one. ;)

    OK so your diabetic what to do now? Cut out sugar. That's about as hard as it gets. :bookworm:

    Your about to learn that sugar is in every thing so your best choice it to cook fresh meals, nothing store bought. Then the next thing you will learn it you body turns carbs into sugar so its best to cut them out as much as possible. Potatoes, rice, pasta, bread start cutting back on those, do this over a few weeks not all at once.

    Do those 2 simple things your blood sugars should come down and you should lose a heap of weight.
    (it takes about month to see the diffrence)

    That's about it. ;)
    :bag:
     
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  8. KathT2Shocked

    KathT2Shocked Type 2 · Newbie

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    I was diagnosed 2 weeks ago and am a bit more resigned to it now. Like you I was v upset. Still worried about eating and what is best, tried to cut out sugar, white bread, pasta and white rice to start. Chocolate has a lot to answer for!
     
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  9. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Hello and welcome to the forum. Dry your tears, lass. There is a wealth of information and fantastic support on this site. There are plenty of options on offer to help you come to grips with your diagnosis and to improve your health and your future well being.

    By the way, I hereby forbid you to blame yourself for this, no one is to blame for developing this condition, weight gain can be a symptom of Diabetes but not always. I was not overweight but still developed T2 so stop blaming yourself as this is a waste of your energy. Have a wander around and ask as many questions as you like.

    First thing to do? Get yourself a glucometer.
     
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  10. Jenny15

    Jenny15 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I can only add to the other replies that say do not blame yourself. There is now good quality research suggesting that our genes predispose us to have blood sugar issues, which then contribute to weight gain, which then makes the issues worse and eventually we get diabetes. I can give you a link to it but I don't want to add to info overload just now.

    I too, was diagnosed last thing on a Friday, which should be banned! I could not call the doctor or nurse to ask questions. They told me in a letter! I then told the GP that was NOT helpful and she shrugged and didn't understand.

    So, I hear ya. Big hugs from all the way over here in NZ. Almost everyone "can" get T2 into remission within a few months, often without medication. And I did not feel hungry or deprived at all.

    The future is bright for you. Now you know what you can do to feel better and prevent it getting worse.
     
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  11. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
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    @Jaz006

    Hello Jaz006 and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it helpful. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will be able to help.



    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  12. Terrytiddy

    Terrytiddy Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Jaz006 welcome to the forum. Please try to stop being upset its not the end of the world. You are a type 2 diabetic so what!!. I totally agree that telling you on a Friday night with no support is bad practice. So pleased that you have found this site/forum. We have all been where you are at this moment and like you wondered what will happen, what am I going to do?
    I would suggest getting a nice cup of tea (no biscuits lol) and have a look at some of the threads on here. There is a lot to take in so do not overload yourself with info. You are in the best place to get help, advice and support. I would suggest getting your own Blood Glucose meter so that you can keep an eye on your Bg. Like people have said please try not to worry to much we are here to help, so any questions just ask. :)
     
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  13. carty

    carty Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Read all you can on here try lowering your carbs and upping your fat intake get a meter and check before eating and 2 hours after to see what certain foods are the do to your glucose levels Great it as a challenge YOU CAN DO IT
    Carol
     
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  14. Jaz006

    Jaz006 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello everyone and thank you so much for your many replies. I have researched a lot over the weekend and am exhausted by all the conflicting information.

    I am thank God on annual leave today.. the A Diabetic Nurse called me at 12 o'clock and made me cry. She asked if I can meet with her at 8.30am on Wednesday? I will go but actually I feel it is too soon and I don't really want to go. I explained how I feel and she said she knows how I feel because her mother was a diabetic and it must be a shock to be told you have....a disease!!!. I guess its all in a days work for her. I have to go to work straight afterwards where I will run my own clinic with patients so I just don't want to be emotional and unprofessional in front of service users.

    Anyway over the weekend I ordered some books and leaflets so I am not going to bury my head in the sand. I am simply upset and need to go at my own pace. I might cancel the appointment, I will see how I feel in the morning.
     
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  15. Jaz006

    Jaz006 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you Carol
     
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  16. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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    Its not the end of the world.. in fact a whole lot of us are now far healthier than we were before!
    Have a read of these
    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/low-carb-success-stories.3763/page-30#post-1778616
     
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  17. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Keep your appointment, would be my advice. I know this is very difficult when you think your head may explode with all the information you've taken in already but if you miss appointments it can set a precedent.
    You are going through a process that is more mentally wearing than it is physically wearing but this time will pass. This is going to sound trite but try to slow down a little, use your favourite passtime to help you relax be it a luxurious bubble bath or a long run etc. Take time out to allow your mind to to get all your concerns and questions into some sort of order ready for your appointment. Take it steady and best wishes.
     
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  18. h884

    h884 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Go for your appt with your questions ready. If you can take someone with you for support. As other forum members are saying take one day at a time
     
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  19. gardengnome42

    gardengnome42 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome. Lovely helpful people here who have all been in the same boat at some time. But don't think of it as a 'Disease' but rather as a 'Condition' that has to be managed.
     
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  20. Jenny15

    Jenny15 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Her word choice was unfortunate. Maybe she was trying to express empathy (awkwardly) by affirming that any new diagnosis is a shock and you need support for dealing with it.

    In the US they use "disease" all the time for disorders/conditions that are not diseases. Few disorders are. It's lazy to call a disorder a disease when there are better alternative words for it.

    No type of diabetes is a disease IMO. Some of the complications are, like kidney disease, but again, other words are fine to describe it.

    Info overload is very common and normal with a new diagnosis. It pays to focus on keeping it all as simple as you can.

    It most likely you have caught diabetes early and will have it all under control pretty quickly. If your blood sugar was super high, you'd be much more symptomatic, and would probably have been told your test result numbers and given more info at the time. Every indication I've seen so far suggests you have caught it early.
     
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