1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2019 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Newly Diagnosed Type 2, Saying Hi :)

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by cazipix, Aug 18, 2018.

  1. cazipix

    cazipix Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Hi All!

    Apologies in advance for a long, possibly ranting at times, post and I don't even know where to start!

    I'm newly diagnosed (this week) as Type 2 following an initial blood test 3 weeks ago that showed a HbA1c of 97. My last blood test 12months ago had a HbA1c of 47, at this stage, my diet had been all over the place and the nurse readily accepted this as an excuse so there was no further follow up and honestly, I didn't think about it again - there was too much going on with my familys health to worry about myself. The nurse thought that such a jump could be an error and everything else was where it should be but using my dad's monitor gave a reading of 18.2 mmol/L so I figured it probably wasn't wrong - I started my research and changed my diet straight away.

    All of that aside, I have lost 3.5st since that test last year following Slimming World (which will start me on a whole other rambling rant so I'll leave that there!) - the last thing I expected when I went in for my blood test was the result I got!!!

    I have been under alot of stress in recent months and my anxiety has gone through the roof, I've spent the last 2 months working on managing the anxiety and decreasing my stress, and then came the blood test and a wake up call.

    My second test this week was 86. My Doctor has put me on Metformin 500mg, 1 a day this week and increasing to 2 a day (1000mg) next week.

    Other than this he has told me to go enjoy my hols (off to Orlando for 2 weeks in early September) and to come back 2 - 4 weeks after I come home for another test and that he will see me 3 times between now and xmas. That's it, no other info, no other advice only to continue the changes I had made in the 2 weeks since the initial test. (Basically ditching SW, implemementing a lower carb diet and generally just educating myself where I could)

    So the emotions have been rampant this week - Monday and Tuesday were tears, generally overwhelmed, denial, anger and disappointment at myself for not paying attention to myself and a whole load more tears... Wednesday I threw myself back into research and by Thursday I am feeling more positive. It helps that in the last 3 weeks, the change in my diet alone has helped me realise how ill I was feeling on a daily basis. I have more energy, I'm sleeping better, I don't feel as thirsty (still drinking over 2l of water a day plus tea or coffee and 'zero' drinks - I made the massive change of changing from Diet Coke to Coke Zero :p) and I'm not getting the same headaches I was either. In general, I feel better, I feel good!

    I got my own monitor, the doctor didn't want to give me one and I've been monitoring my numbers, they aren't where they need to be just yet but they are coming down day by day. This mornings reading on waking was 7.6 mmol/L - I'm still figuring out what food causes bigger spikes than others but I'd be lost and completely out of my depth without the monitor! On the plus side, I'm 9lbs down since the initial test :)

    Alot of well meant advice from friends and family has been tiring - the do this, eat that, avoid sugar like the plague, 'of course you can eat potatoes' conversations are wearying, from my family moreso, my friends have been more like what do you need to do, how can we help - which is what I need, I don't need the conversations over every meal about why mashed potatoes are higher GI than boiled... it's not productive! I wish I could vocalize that though, no such luck though!!

    So, here I am, 5 days since my official diagnosis, 3 weeks since my intial test. My own research has led me to this forum and it's taken me several attempts to even write this message but I'm looking forward to learning more and getting to know people here :)

    If you made it this far, thanks for reading :) the typing was quite theraputic!!
     
    • Hug Hug x 5
    • Like Like x 4
  2. wifeofdiabetic2

    wifeofdiabetic2 Type 1 · Newbie

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    23
    I’ve just been diagnosed as type 2, and am doing Slimmingworld anyway. What are your problems with the diet ?
     
  3. Phoenix55

    Phoenix55 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    577
    Likes Received:
    590
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Welcome to the forum @cazipix. I will tag @daisy1 for you will be along with a lot of useful advice for newbies. Well done for getting so far with everything else that is going on. Time to look after yourself for a bit. You have a meter and strips but do you test before and after every meal to check what is happening to your blood sugars? If you then match the readings with a food diary you will begin to work out which foods are causing the raised bg levels. The difference between first bite and 2 hours later should be no more than 2 and if possible less. Potatoes in whatever way are full of carbs and carbs are digested as sugar. We all tend to differ slightly in what we can tolerate and so diets have to be tailor made to the individual and keeping the food diary is a bind initially until you start to find the patterns. I used a simple spreadsheet which I could then adapt to include exercise and mood/anxiety levels to see how those affected my bg. a bit like a personal diary. It is a tie but it is worth it in the long run, and diabetes is a marathon run for life, not a sprint. You will probably find that foods containing grain flours also affect your bg too. Take a breath and well done on your first post - I have seen more explosive rants on here and that is partly what we are here to help you with, so rant away.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  4. Geoffno6

    Geoffno6 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    524
    Likes Received:
    1,690
    Trophy Points:
    138
    Hi @cazipix, welcome to the forum, I’m newish to this, diagnosed 7 weeks ago. I received a similar lack of advice.
    I’ve studied diabetes for 100s of hours and all the tests help avoid things which spike my BG levels but also throw up non stop string of mysteries. I think cut carbs and be patient is probably the most common advice I’ve received. I’m still struggling with so much egg, meat, fish and cream but any worries over eating that are more than outweighed by worries over high BG levels. Good luck and let us know what things have what effects on your BG levels.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    9,326
    Likes Received:
    11,178
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi cazipix and welcome. You have started the trio of things that have got my HbA1c back to non diabetic levels and maintained them there for nearly a year now, that is self monitoring, low carbing and Metformin. Well done for educating yourself and taking the initiative. You have encountered the lack of info and support from your health care providers which is sadly all too common. Please make sure you have been referred for an eye check, a foot check up and an education session and your GP needs to sign a form to save you prescriptions fees as your now entitled to a medical exemption card to get all meds on prescription free. Come back and ask anything that occurs to you.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. cazipix

    cazipix Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Hi wifeofdiabetic2 :)

    I have been following SW for almost 5 years - I lost 5st, put back on 6 (3 of which while still at the group!) - rejoined last Sept and lost 1st between then and January and have another 2 1/2 lost since I stopped going.

    My biggest issues, and this may be largely down to the consultant I had, but it is the 'Free Foods' and the lack of education around portion control and carbs. Genuinely, the consultant I had would say at least once in every class, that you can eat as much free food as you want and still lose weight - she would also advocate not excercising for the first 6 weeks of being on plan... maybe that should have been a warning sign :rolleyes:

    Obviously, her expectation must be that we will eat a reasonable portion but realistically... I'm going because I'm overweight and I'm overweight because I eat too much... I just feel like this isn't addressed.

    I believe it works as I have seen weight loss myself and in others who have kept it off but it doesn't educate unfortuately, not in my experience anyway.

    Alot of the practices I still use and I follow the same recipes and I cook all of my meals from scratch but I've stopped counting syns - one of my go to snacks would have been a Caramel Snack A Jack, Toffee Muller Light and a banana - usually with an apple or something speedy on the side - Knowing what I know now about Carbs and monitoring carbs, I wouldn't dream of it - a snack that had 2.5/3 syns has over 40g of carbs before you count something 'speedy'

    Interestingly though, the SP plan on SW would be much more friendly but they will tell you not to do it for more than a week at a time.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. cazipix

    cazipix Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Thanks everyone for the welcomes and such kind words and advice, it is much appreciated :) I

    I have been testing before I start to eat and again 2 hours later, I'm using the Contour Next One monitor so it's syncing to my phone and I'm logging my food also, I've had a great variety of food over the last couple of weeks though, I didn't realise just how stuck in a rut my food had become!!! I've also rediscovered my love of cooking - that had disappeared over the last 12-18 months!

    @Phoenix55 - thank you, I think you have answered a question I hadn't gotten around to asking just yet! If I read your reply correctly - when I test 2 hours after I begin eating, my bg levels should ideally be no more than 2 higher than before the meal? If this is the case then I already have a clearer understanding of what I can eat! Porridge and potatoes are out the window, baby potatoes can stay :) Pasta I'll try again over the weekend as if I'm honest I probably ate too much of it :p 100g dried weight per person is what I'm used to preparing so may have to adjust a little!

    @Geoffno6 - thanks for the advice :) I have a feeling I'll be a regular around here so will be sure to let ye know :)

    @Rachox - thank you, I haven't been referred to anyone else just yet but the nurse was on hols last week so I'll give her a ring this week - I got the forms for the medication from the reception but will look into the rest on Monday - I'm lucky (if thats the right thought) that I've been off work for the last couple of weeks because of other health issues brought on by stress and anxiety so I have next week to get my head around it a little more before I'm back to work :)

    Thanks again everyone!!!
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  8. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    26,459
    Likes Received:
    4,871
    Trophy Points:
    248
    @cazipix

    Hello Cazipix and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  9. cazipix

    cazipix Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    23
  10. Geoffno6

    Geoffno6 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    524
    Likes Received:
    1,690
    Trophy Points:
    138
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook