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Newly diagnosed with very high numbers - confused by symptoms

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by jjne, Jun 22, 2021.

  1. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek I reversed my Type 2 · Expert

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    HI @Kimble73 ,

    ...That's.... A lot of carbs. More than I can get away with. And here in the Netherlands, the advice I got was wholewheat, brown everything, fruit, sweet potatoes, etc, etc, just like you were advised... That still spiked me something awful. I actually followed a Canadian doctor's advice, haha. (Dr. Jason Fung, Uni of Toronto). Really, we're all different. This worked for you, it wouldn't work for me. The OP (with a very high HbA1c) will find out with their meter what works for them and what doesn't, or as some would say "can get away with" as the bulk of us have. But do enjoy that sweet potato for me, I rather miss it!
    :)
    Jo
     
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  2. jjne

    jjne · Well-Known Member

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    I can see both sides to this to be honest. I was trying to balance the carb thing but, on the face of it that isn't really working for me, or doesn't seem to be.

    I dunno, the NHS in their literature seems to emphasise the need for some carbs, and my practitioning nurse who gave me "the talk" stated that all foods are converted to sugar not just carbs. The issue for me of course is trying to work through conflicting information.

    Very few carbs in 24 hours and blood glucose down more than two points.

    I am going to give this a week or two at least, and see if it comes down and stays down. I can certainly see the logic of not taking in carbs, forcing the body to dig into its reserves etc. And of course if there's nothing going in then nothing comes out, simple chemistry. Ultimately though I need *some* sources of sugar though, right?

    It is confusing but the pressing need that I can see just now is getting the numbers down. I can cross other bridges that might result from this course of action when I come to them. Clearly people are thriving long-term with this diet so it must be doing something right.
     
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  3. jjne

    jjne · Well-Known Member

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    Just one other thing - my blood sugar meter. I bought an Amazon special (Sinocare Safe AQ). The numbers it gives do seem to be relatively sensible for my condition but is it generally an "OK" device, or do I need to sling it and get myself down to Boots? It wasn't overly cheap for what it is.
     
  4. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

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    What is the other side? I genuinely have never found anything that shows we categorically need any source of sugar. Much of the nhs info is simply outdated. They do however also support low carb and even have an education package approved for their staff (if they choose to take it)
     
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  5. Kimble73

    Kimble73 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Limiting salt is important to prevent heart disease, and blood pressure issues. I was told this in the class, not to cut it out completely, just don’t add it to all your food, I have some salt on my roast beef, as an example. With brown rice have it once in a while, in portion. You can have sweet potatoes in moderation, like half of one. And I was just saying that I was from Canada and some counties have different ideas,,

    [mod edit.]
     
    #25 Kimble73, Jun 24, 2021 at 5:36 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 24, 2021
  6. Kimble73

    Kimble73 Type 2 · Active Member

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    I got my first meter from my diabetic class, then I got my second one from a pharmacy, the meter is free and you pay for your lancets and strips. I really recommend going to Diabetes classes through your local hospital, they teach you everything when your new to Diabetes. With Covid they probably can give you info over the phone it’s all free. Like I said I’m from Canada, and I went to classes when I was first diagnosed. Or talk to your doctor to with any questions relating to your diabetes.
     
  7. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

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    Yep different countries, different areas, different drs even have different ideas. That is why you need to find what works for you.

    The nhs here in the U.K. teach similar to what you were taught. It simply doesn’t help a lot of type 2 by anything like enough depending on our starting point and degree of “diabeticness”. It might still be an improvement for others. We in here are the lucky few that find our own way if that’s the case (supported by other more progressive expert drs, their teachings and other publications and studies) rather than go down the progressively worsening path many of those same drs that teach the official line expect us to.
     
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  8. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    The fewer cars we eat and the less processed food the more salt we need to keep our bodies healthy. It is also known that salt affecting blood pressure depends on whether we are salt sensitive or not. Of course we don't know if we are salt sensitive. I believe I am not because I add salt to my food but have never had high blood pressure and my heart is healthy.

    Yes different countries vary in what they advise (but not by much) but diabetes is the same wherever we live. Sweet potato may be fine for some but not for others. Our reactions to foods are different. This is why we need meters to show us what we can or cannot manage.
     
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  9. Rog

    Rog Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Wellcome JJNE - I was in your shoes almost exactly over 6 years ago and this board sorted me out . Get on the hflc diet , plenty of walking and you’ll be delighted .
     
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  10. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    On a low carb diet some salt is needed, particularly in hot weather, or there is the distinct possibility of really painful cramps.
    I don't use salt in cooking, boil bacon to remove the preservatives, so I have to remember to put a small pinch of salt in my morning coffee most months of the year.
    I need to be quite low carb, but find that I can have mushrooms and a stir fry with breakfast, or a big salad, and still have a fairly substantial evening meal.
    I don't need to eat in between, my drink is either water or coffee with cream. I do sometimes have tea, either a berry mixture or a mix of mint and liquorice, either hot or cod depending on the season.
    These days I'd have walked out if anyone had told me that all food is converted to sugar. Firstly it isn't true and secondly at my age I don't feel like wasting my time.
     
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  11. Rog

    Rog Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    jjne
    Breakfast
    Avocado one oatcake
    Lunch
    Two boiled eggs
    5pm
    Two total full fat
    Two oatcakes and cheese
    dinner
    Sea bass or salmon with broccoli / spinach
    Evening snack
    2 oatcakes and cheese
    This diet is hard for 10 days or so then your off to a new life of a T2 or maybe a T1 ( not sure )
     
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  12. jjne

    jjne · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks once again for the comments.

    I have to say that as a layman, but a layman with a scientific background, the comments about all foods converting to sugar didn't sit well with me, but I'm not the expert :) I mean they're fundamentally different molecules, and I think it takes more energy to convert fats to carbs than you'd get out of them anyway.

    I am trying a (near as damnit) complete "keto" diet for a week to see what it does to my blood sugar levels. I'm not going to continually test myself because (1) if no sugar is going in I don't see the point, it's not going to spike right? and (2) I've run out of the strips and won't be getting more for a few days!

    I'm going to get some fish, meat, berries etc for the next week. I go on 3xMetformin as well as of today so perhaps that will also contribute.
     
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  13. jjne

    jjne · Well-Known Member

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    And it's working. After only a few days my blood sugars are down to 9 and falling / not rising significantly after meals - and this is despite having a tandoori mixed grill and a third of a portion of chicken madras from the local takeaway at the weekend (rice avoided!

    Still some way to go but steady (and quite quick) progress. Continuing to lose weight too :joyful:

    I'm so pleased I joined this site, and cannot adequately enough express my gratitude for the advice given - thankyou!
     
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  14. Kimble73

    Kimble73 Type 2 · Active Member

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    That’s so good to hear that your sugars are coming down, I’m happy for you.
     
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  15. jjne

    jjne · Well-Known Member

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    I seem to be hitting the same issue I did the other week, where the numbers hit a certain threshold then refuse to go down further.

    Last night I was 10.1 after a carb-free meal. Excellent I thought, not spiking this is good.

    However, this morning I was still at 9.8. And after testing myself again today, after eating absolutely nothing, it went from 9.8 to 9.7 and now 9.6.

    Is this right? It almost seems as if my body "wants" to be at this figure and is failing to produce any insulin to get the number down, despite it still being high. I found this previously without metformin where it would stabilise at about 11.5 or so.

    Should I inform the doctor about this? Or is this some sort of normal body reaction to being starved of carbs and burning up reserves?

    I should point out I am not hungry and do not have cravings. I've had probably a total of 20g of carbs since last Wednesday, plus whatever that (almost totally meat) takeaway had in it on Saturday (which did not spike me either).

    This could be a duff glucose meter, although I have my doubts. I've bought another one to be sure, just in case. I did change to a new batch of strips, direct from the manufacturer the other day.
     
  16. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Your liver will release glucose into your bloodstream if you don't eat - so you can run around to find some food. It is a perfectly normal reaction.
    I eat every 12 hours, usually and find that not eating when I get up makes for higher blood glucose levels.
     
  17. jjne

    jjne · Well-Known Member

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    Right, tuna salad it is then!

    Let's see what happens.

    Naive me thought the pancreas would just work if it sensed sugar in blood, at any time of the day.

    Thanks for the reply! I will make sure I eat first thing in future. I had thought that the longer one fasted the better, but clearly that doesn't work, for me anyway.

    So it's normal for the pancreas to essentially sit around and not release insulin during the day if a person does not eat? As that seems to be the implication here.
     
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    #37 jjne, Jun 28, 2021 at 4:39 PM
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2021
  18. MrsA2

    MrsA2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If only it were that simple.
    Insulin production, and the resulting blood glucose, can be affected by
    Sleep, or lack of it
    Exercise, or lack of it
    Stress, or lack of it
    Medications
    Temperature
    Food, or lack of it

    (There maybe more too)

    Carbs is the worst offender but I have days when fasting when bg has peaked due to extreme stress and lack of sleep
     
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  19. jjne

    jjne · Well-Known Member

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    I accept that, and I get what you are saying.

    But flatlining? Repeatedly? A perfect storm of stress, lack of sleep and the wrong food that results in... no change whatsoever?

    There's a rabbit out here I'm sure of it.
     
  20. jjne

    jjne · Well-Known Member

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    Oh, and two hours after a tuna salad, lettuce, tomato, tuna, olive oil, bit of Hellmans mayo... 9.8. No change lol.

    I'm sure this blood glucose monitor is talking out of its eject button, I really am.
     
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