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NHS prescription charges

Discussion in 'Benefits' started by Tel14, May 17, 2020.

  1. Tel14

    Tel14 · Member

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    Hi all,
    I am in the process of being diagnosed with diabetes- still awaiting tests to confirm if type II or LADA. Currently taking Gliclazide 80mg twice daily.

    Prior to all this kicking off a couple of weeks ago, I had an NHS pre-payment card for my prescription as a take a couple of other medications.
    My understanding is that if you are diabetic you get your prescriptions for free? My questions are...
    1. Is this true- my internet research seems to suggest so
    2. Is it only your diabetic meds you don’t get charged for, or does everything on your prescription (diabetes related or not) become free of charge?

    I ask because if it is free then I need to look in to cancelling my monthly pre-payment card fee.

    Many thanks as always!
     
  2. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
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    Diabetes Melitus qualifies you for a Medical Exemption Certificate which can be used for all prescriptions once you have it.
     
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    #2 urbanracer, May 17, 2020 at 11:57 AM
    Last edited: May 17, 2020
  3. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Just phone up the NHS Business Services Authority to cancel your current prepayment card and then apply for the Medical Exemption card, you need a form from your GP. Here’s more info:
    https://www.nhs.uk/using-the-nhs/help-with-health-costs/get-help-with-prescription-costs/
    It does cover all meds so long as you remain on diabetic meds. If you have to pay for prescriptions in the mean time explain to the pharmacy that you’re waiting for your new card. You can get fined if you claim free prescriptions without a card, but they can issue a receipt and you can claim back the cost once you receive your new card.
     
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  4. Tel14

    Tel14 · Member

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    Great, thanks for taking time to reply, much appreciated!
     
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  5. Tel14

    Tel14 · Member

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    Great, thanks for taking time to reply, much appreciated!
     
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  6. Bildad

    Bildad Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    It actually covers all your meds to the end date of the
    card even if you come off diabetes meds.
    I came off my diabetes meds last year and rang to tell them to see if I needed to send the card back or just destroy it. I was told that it remained valid until the end date. Good news!
     
  7. CelalDari

    CelalDari · Guest

    You qualify for a medical exemption certificate if your diabetes is not managed by just diet alone which means you have to take tablets and/or insulin. You can request the form from your GP, it is a quick process just asking for simple details such as your qualifying medical condition, NHS number and basic personal details. Your GP will access your medical records and confirm your illness then send the form to the appropriate place (although they may ask you to send it).

    You should receive your medical exemption certificate through the post. I am sure it will take a few weeks probably maximum 3 weeks or so. I’m still waiting on mine but it has only been a week and a half or so.

    You become exempt from all prescription charges so anything prescribed by a doctor will be absolutely free whether that is insulin, anti-diabetic tablets or something as simple as an antibiotic like Amoxcillin. Obviously over-the-counter medication still comes out of your pocket.

    You should ideally fill the form in as soon as possible. You should cancel your monthly pre-payment card and pay as you go for any medication until you receive your certificate.
     
    • Like Like x 1
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