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No hypo symptoms

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by SianyG, Sep 25, 2017.

  1. SianyG

    SianyG Type 1 · Member

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    Hello I'm 26 and have been type 1 for only 10 weeks. My bs have been between 4 and 9 for the passed 7 weeks. I've had 4 accounts when my levels have been below 4 but When I have been 4.5 I've had the shakes and I've ate something before they become any lower but for the passed 2 weeks I've had no symptoms when my bloods are dropping. I've felt fine and checked my bs before bed and they have been 3.5. Does anyone else have this issue? I feel in compelte denial of having type 1 diabetics as I'm managing my bs and not experienceing signs of a hypo. I can't get my head around it. X
     
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  2. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hypo symptoms are important. A lack of symptoms would be something to raise with your DSN. Hypo symptoms are important because the symptoms are caused by adrenaline and the release of adrenaline in response to a low blood sugar is also part of your body trying to raise your blood sugar - it's a hormone that is counter regulatory to insulin. If you are not aware of your hypos you should not be driving. Your DSN may advise to raise your target blood sugar to stay above 5 for a few weeks as this should re-establish hypo awareness, it may also be worth doing some overnight testing to check you aren't having missed hypos during the night that need addressing.
     
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  3. SockFiddler

    SockFiddler Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  4. diamondnostril

    diamondnostril Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @SianyG . . .

    What diet are you using to manage your blood-sugar?

    If you are in Ketosis (Very-Low-Carb/Ketogenic/LCHF diet) then your brain may not generate warning symptoms simply because it does not feel under threat from low blood-sugar levels.

    This is not the same as losing Hypo awareness. So we should at least exclude this possibility first.

    Strategies for regaining Hypo awareness will not be needed if it has not been lost!

    Regards :)
    Antony
     
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  5. himtoo

    himtoo Type 1 · Well-Known Member
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    Hi there @SianyG
    welcome to the forum !! :)

    It is a huge thing to get your head around when first diagnosed , so it is no surprise you are finding it a bit difficult.

    the really good news is you have found us here. I would start by saying to try and remember to be kind to yourself -- you are going to have this T1D for a long time.
    I would definitely keep in constant contact with your DSN ( Diabetic specialist nurse )
    I would buy the book "Think Like A Pancreas" .

    As @catapillar says -- hypo awareness is really important , so getting in touch with your nurse sooner rather than later is a good idea.
     
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  6. SianyG

    SianyG Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you I haven't been in touch with my nurse for a few weeks now, I don't like to feel like a burden lol I don't have any type of diet ATM I just eat 3 meals a day with a little carb in each. I'm not stricked or anything although now having type 1 I'd like to become more healthy as I've never been on a diet before but I don't want to be poorly later on in life. I work 14 hour shifts in work and I have to juggle work and eating which is exaughsting as before this I use to skip meals c
     
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  7. himtoo

    himtoo Type 1 · Well-Known Member
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    hey @SianyG
    that is a great reply and is exactly what I would be doing in your position.
    trying to keep as much routine in your life in these early months is really important.
    working 14 hour shifts will not be helping in terms of trying to keep the diabetes in check.

    are you keeping records of your blood testing on a phone app ( or an old fashioned written diary )

    doing this helps both you and your nurse to look for patterns and from looking at patterns possible changes can be looked at to your regime.

    finally -- you are NOT a burden -- you didn't ask for this -- your nurse gets paid to assist you as much as you need -- over the years you will end up being much more able to do all the figuring out by yourself -- but in these early months do use her expertise to assist you

    all the best !!
     
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  8. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I've been diabetic for over 30 years and I often don't feel hypo when I'm 3.5. I do at around 3.0 and you have felt hypo before you said so you may not have a big problem at this time. You didn't say how much insulin they put you on. The 14 hour shifts will probably trend you on the low side of things. I've learned that if you lead your NHA people/team to think you are "hypo unaware" they will stop you from driving somehow even if you haven't had a problem driving hypo. I'd be careful what you say about that.
     
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  9. SianyG

    SianyG Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you for the advice my job does involve a lot of driving also. I'm on 24 units Lantus and take novorapid with my meals. Today I woke up with 4.9 the highest I've been today is 7.0 and I've just come home from another 14 hour shift and I'm 4.6 I've felt fine all day just really tiered. Would you say these Bs are ok? I've attended 3 small meals today ☺️
     
  10. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I can run those sugars a lot of days and feel fine. I also take 25 Lantus and Novorapid with meals depends, usually 4-8 units depending on what I eat and where I start out. Where I'm careful is bedtime especially if I take my Novorapid at, say, 7pm and retire at 9:30-10pm. Then I have a snack designed to last me through the night. Just be careful what you say to healthcare providers there about possibly being "hypo unaware". For one thing they probably don't have much of a clue as to what it is, and for another thing if they decide to report you to the diabetes police you could get your license suspended. Somebody last week had that happen to them, and they had never ever had a problem driving with diabetes. It was a mess for him. He was afraid of losing his job because of it.
     
  11. SianyG

    SianyG Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you so much ☺️
     
  12. Chas C

    Chas C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  13. Esther444

    Esther444 · Member

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