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Nurses failing to administer insulin correctly

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Diabeticger, Sep 15, 2020.

  1. Diabeticger

    Diabeticger Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Am in hospital for a stint and in general I've been administering it myself , this morning the staff nurse asked was it ok fine student did it to which I agreed , I knew straight away it didn't work and said as much, the staff nurse said the would test the bloods before the next meal and sure as God it had spiked , she again asked could the student try again I agreed and same thing again , I know for a fact it didn't go in but again the staff nurse reckons I'm just not feeling it and will check my bloods post meal, should I bring this up with someone higher, or leave it roll , dont want to get anyone in trouble but its after pushing my levels out of line
     
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  2. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

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    It's your health at risk here, do what you have to do to get things done right or administer it yourself. This can't be aloud to keep happening.
     
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  3. Rokaab

    Rokaab Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You must tell them, he/she is a student nurse, they need to know when they've done it wrong so they can learn, if you tell them its all fine when its not they may never do it correctly. And at least get your levels under control before letting them administer any more.
     
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  4. Diabeticger

    Diabeticger Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's not the student I'm angry at surely the staff nurse realise i know my own body and rutine, and it's easier to sort a hypo than trying to get your levels back in range, probably be a few days before I'm back in control
     
  5. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't report her BUT I would make sure she didn't inject me again AND tell her why I wouldn't let her do it again. How can you get an insulin jab wrong?
     
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  6. Mitchigan

    Mitchigan Prediabetes · Newbie

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    She is a student, she needs to listen and learn. We are all allowed to make REASONABLE mistakes. Couldn't she try on an orange. No one is benefitting by letting this pass. May be have a word with her mentor.
     
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  7. Ryhia

    Ryhia Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Would the not let you administer this yourself with her watching so she can learn from you?
     
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  8. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Always did my own thing when in hospital but good of you to help with the training!
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  9. hh1

    hh1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm puzzled, and with @porl69 on this, how can they get it wrong? @Diabeticger you said you knew straight away it hadn't worked; how did you know and is there a reason you couldn't explain that to the staff nurse?
     
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  10. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi,

    There's only on question I'm thinking right now. How many other patients is this student practicing on?

    I personally wouldn't allow it to happen again. I mentally hold up "score cards" when any HCP is injecting me.
     
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  11. Mitchigan

    Mitchigan Prediabetes · Newbie

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    Read your comments again. Maybe the staff nurse is getting muddled with the loss of sensation some diabetics experience. If she thought it was given correctly sounds like it was wrong.Refer her back to when the student first mis-administered your medication. Should be signed on your drug chart. Refer the staff nurse back to the high post meal level. May be ask to speak to her privately and make sure she understands the issues. She is going to be supervising more students. Is she teaching them correctly? Why didn’t she realise you were right when the levels were raised? You don’t want your medication increased or altered without good reason. Your hospital doctor won’t realise why your levels were higher unless it’s explained to them. There’s nothing wrong with a bit of mutual learning.
     
  12. Mrs T 123

    Mrs T 123 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I would defo advise the staff nurse that twice it has been done wrong, as the student needs to learn how to do it properly if no one tells her she is doing it wrong she will continue doing what she thinks is right, the quicker she finds out the easier it will be to change it and it could be dangerous her not injecting properly and may be even fatal with someone.
     
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  13. Diabeticger

    Diabeticger Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I always feel the tiny scratch, they use different needles than usual in here , the needle is didden and you have to press down until you hear a click then press the plunger , as I said when it happened at breakfast I knew and you could see the insulin dripping down my stomach, insaidnit to the staff nurse and her attitude was , it worked and if it didn't they could correct it at the next.dose , so before lunch the exact same thing happened and again she refused to believe me saying I'm probably just immune to the feeling of the needle, my bloods for the past 6 weeks have been constantly between 5.5 and 6.7 the bloods before lunch were at 12.4 , will take a few days at least to get the levels back to "normal" again

    Again not blaming the student but the staff nurse, i know my own body and she didn't seem to want to believe me
     
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  14. Diabeticger

    Diabeticger Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Would love to but I'm in Ireland
     
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  15. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi again,

    Do you feel the student & staffnurse's vision could be obscured regarding the needle depth perspective & the insulin left on your skin, regarding the possibility of wearing PPE visors..?

    Odd question I know. But it sounds like you are getting treatment from "Mr Magoo."
     
  16. Diabeticger

    Diabeticger Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Haha, just think the student is used to the standard needle where its prick and push, these needles are designed for people with needle phobias , theres a little bubble like cover on the top and you have almost stab the skin to break the bubble and the needle to penetrate, thenpoor girl had the right method for the wrong needle
     
  17. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    I thought the same. Either the needle went in or it didn't (4mm?) and was the pen plunger pushed all the way or not?
     
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  18. Hopeful34

    Hopeful34 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I use a pump, but recently realised I had very few pen needles left as a backup in case pump failed, so ordered them, and instead of usual ones, got some that sound similar to these, and wanted to try them out with a correction dose. Exactly the same thing happened to me. Tried twice more with a new needle, and the insulin just runs down my body. No idea why unless they're faulty. Used pens for years prior to pump, so well used to injecting.
     
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  19. Richard F

    Richard F Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    New needles aren't as good, always always try an air shot 1st
     
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  20. JMK1954

    JMK1954 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have met the belief that a diabetic can't feel an injection or a fingerprick for a blood test before. It seems to be quite common among nursing staff, so anything you can do to educate those you meet can only help. You will have to insist on doing your injections yourself -just to ensure your survival. Explain why and apologise by all means, but make it clear that you can always feel your injections and show the BS levels you have recorded. All HCPs need to realise that anyone with diabetes manages their own condition every day of their life and what we say should be taken seriously. This is a serious situation and it can't be allowed to continue.
     
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