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Oh...

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Krx, Mar 21, 2019.

  1. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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    Kind of how I felt when I was told that T2 was a chronic progressive disease and I'd end up on insulin.
    I now use the surgery for testing ... usually get results online.
    I found using the anger to prove them wrong was a surprisingly strong motivator. It has led to better overall health, significant weight loss and the departure of many weight induced conditions from my life. All without medication.
     
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  2. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    Welcome here lack of sleep can lead to diabetes type 2 , but so can quetiapine ( in my case 400-600 mg)which I’ll ask if you have tried for your very servere insomnia , it has helped me greatly as a side effect of trying to cure my eternal depressions and stress ... makes me sleep like a baby

    Maybe you could try also eating more Vegs high in potassium it could also help brain fog from not sleeping spinach( is high in potassium ) in smoothies f.x in high fat yoghurt with a little lemon and water
     
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    #22 Freema, May 9, 2019 at 11:13 AM
    Last edited: May 9, 2019
  3. Krx

    Krx Type 2 · Member

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    Hi! back for a ramble/rant...

    I have to say, apart from the nagging leg pain, which is a fraction of what it was while I was on Metformin, I quite literally feel on top of the world. And literally every one of my friends has remarked (quite independently of each other) that I look ten years younger. Even ones I haven't told about my health issues and aren't just saying it to patronise me!

    I haven't felt this good in decades. Probably because I was ill and extremely intolerant of the things I was eating on a daily basis and didn't even know it, I guess!

    Clearly, having a "chronic progressive disease" agrees with me...

    Or rather, ignoring everything the NHS has to say on the subject and adhering to the wisdom of people on this forum that have the benefit of years of experimentation and experience have allowed me to shortcut to more than just managing it, but more or less reversing it within a matter of weeks.

    If I had taken to heart everything I've been told by doctors and diabetes clinics, I could very easily have spiralled into depression and lost all hope by now.

    Honestly, in my opinion, they're not just giving out bad advice, they're actually doling out ignorant, ill informed and potentially downright dangerous information. It's really quite disgusting.

    The nature of the leg thing has changed shape a few times with diet and dropping my meds completely. To the point where I'm actually beginning to wonder if I might, while completely unable to feel my foot, have done something more drastic, like a fracture or break. Now I can actually feel my leg again, although the pain hasn't diminished, It just doesn't feel like nerve pain. And what was largely exhibiting in my butt, has actually 'moved' back to my lower back, which is where I always had a problem anyway.

    The biggest problem is that apparently I'm now defined by my 'disease', and whilst they're happy to dismiss the notion that what I experience is related to peripheral neuropathy, at the same time, they seem entirely reluctant to even attempt to diagnose what is really going on. Telling them I've passed out from pain a number of times left them completely unphased and still unwilling to even look into the cause.

    So in the spirit of 'going my own way' with this whole saga, I've got a few local recommendations for a chiropractor and a sports therapist, and I'm going to see if any of those are willing to actually listen to what I have to say and offer any advice or relief. I realise they can't prescribe meds, but that's really not what I want anyway.

    I still feel angry and let down by the appalling 'treatment' I'm getting from the NHS, but it's opened my eyes to the truth of the matter (Which apparently is that they have no idea what they're doing, and they don't care anyway...). I haven't actually told them I've stopped my meds or anything. I thought I'd wait for the inevitable self-congratulatory assertion that my 'miraculous' reversal of fortunes is down to their prescription meds before I dropped that particular bombshell on them. And I'll do so with an immense amount of satisfaction, believe me.

    I guess my point is, for anyone reading... don't give up hope. Don't resign yourself to the fate they want you to believe you're destined for. Don't just accept a bunch of meds with nasty side effects for the rest of your life. Do your own research. Find your own path! After all, you know you better than anyone...

    (Another 'side effect' of my 'condition' and determination to not be defined by it... if you knew me, a post like this would be incredulous. I am (I was) the ultimate pessimist. It turns out, after a change of diet, I'm actually a much nicer and more positive person than I thought I was. Who knew?).
     
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  4. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I too feel so much better controlling my blood glucose with diet alone - the blackberries and cream I just ate might have something to do with it - the deep depression I got into whilst taking the tablets is a vague memory now - I do remember having back back pain for years after my second child was born and it went away after I stretched my spine - I could feel the vertebrae clunking into place, and it hurt for a day or so, but I was half an inch taller and pain free - so a chiropractor might indeed be able to help - I was just told that I ought to lose weight and my back would get better, the cure was entirely accidental.
     
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  5. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have a minor congenital back issue (one of my vertebra is slightly out of position). My older brother has a severe version of this (his back is an S shape because the bottom of one slipped under the top of the one that was supposed to be beneath it) and had to have spinal fusion surgery in his early 20s (the surgeons were amazed he could still walk and didn't want to do anything which might change that). Anyway, as I hit 50 I started to get really bad back pain (couldn't stand for more than 30 minutes without pain and was regularly getting pain on medium walks). I duly went to physio and saw a back specialist/surgeon. The specialist told me he could operate, but that physio would have a good chance to reverse things without the operation. So after some specialist physio, and weekly trips to the gym that emphasise core body strength, I am symptom free, and able to go on pain free day long walks.
    So the point is: many back issues can be treated by the right physio/exercise and/or an orthopaedic surgeon. Your GP may be useless, but they should be able to refer you to someone, and personally I'd recommend seeing them privately if it looks like the NHS queue is going to take forever.
    Good luck, and well done on the T2 remission. (Though bear in mind that if your results get worse and you've no more carbs to discard, LADA can present very very slowly. A recent news article state that 38% of T1s diagnosed as adults started with a T2 diagnosis.. If you're T1 rather than T2, then insulin can be your friend, and you shouldn't fear moving onto it if it becomes necessary.)

    Unfortunately your story confirms my suspicion that T2s are very much second class citizens under the NHS system.
     
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  6. 1spuds

    1spuds Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Krx wrote........Or rather, ignoring everything the NHS has to say on the subject and adhering to the wisdom of people on this forum that have the benefit of years of experimentation and experience have allowed me to shortcut to more than just managing it, but more or less reversing it within a matter of weeks.

    Honestly, in my opinion, they're not just giving out bad advice, they're actually doling out ignorant, ill informed and potentially downright dangerous information. It's really quite disgusting.

    I still feel angry and let down by the appalling 'treatment' I'm getting from the NHS, but it's opened my eyes to the truth of the matter (Which apparently is that they have no idea what they're doing, and they don't care anyway...). I haven't actually told them I've stopped my meds or anything. I thought I'd wait for the inevitable self-congratulatory assertion that my 'miraculous' reversal of fortunes is down to their prescription meds before I dropped that particular bombshell on them. And I'll do so with an immense amount of satisfaction, believe me.


    ======================================
    KRX you figured out in post 23 what some people never figure out in a lifetime. I did just as you are doing,I found the 'experts' downright scary.
     
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    #26 1spuds, May 16, 2019 at 3:04 AM
    Last edited: May 16, 2019
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