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Other health problems when suffering from diabetes type 2

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by christopher52, Mar 22, 2017.

  1. christopher52

    christopher52 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Hi, I am suffering from hot and cold sweats at any time and can fall asleep mainly after having a meal. My doctor has had blood tests done including the one for thyroid problems and they have all come back o.k, so my G.P has put the hot and cold sweats down to the change of life, but I still think it is diabetes connected.
    I was wondering if anyone else is going through the same problem and what advice they can give me - it might be diet connected.
     
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  2. 13lizanne

    13lizanne Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi there and welcome to the forum @christopher52 I'm tagging @daisy1 for you she'll be along shortly with some good information including a link to a free low carb diet programme. Insulin is a hormone (and change of life involves fluctuations in "female" hormones) the symptoms of fluctuations in insulin can also cause flushes and sweats. This happens to me if my blood sugars drop too low or if they have spiked to a higher level than normal. Our aim as diabetics is to keep our blood glucose levels as steady as possible, daisy's information and eating lower carb will help you to do that. Ask any further questions you have and someone will answer you. Good luck
     
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  3. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    @christopher52

    Hello Christopher and welcome to the Forum :) As mentioned above, here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you need to and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 147,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.

    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. They're all free.
    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why :)
    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  4. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    Hello @christopher52 and Welcome to the Forum :). Ask any questions you may have ?
    We are all helpful and friendly on here :).
     
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  5. Chook

    Chook Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello @christopher52

    I used to get those symptoms before I got my blood glucose under control by severely restricting carbohydrates. The sweats were particularly bad at night and the more carbs I ate the more I could barely keep my eyes open. As I said, eating a low carb diet really helped me.

    Has your doctor done the HbA1C blood test to find out if you are diabetic?
     
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  6. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. Other than your blood sugar going too low it's unlikely that diabetes is the cause of you symptoms but there will always be exceptions.
     
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  7. Chook

    Chook Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to disagree but I got those symptoms when my blood sugar was high and uncontrolled.
     
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  8. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    I only get the "sweating" about 15 - 20 minutes after eating something sweet.
     
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  9. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    welcome here christopher52 :)


    how high are your blood glucose ?
     
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  10. KezG

    KezG Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @christopher52 Hello and welcome to the forum.. I too fall asleep after eating. Still trying to keep my carb intake low.
     
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  11. brittyb

    brittyb Type 2 · Member

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    I am the same at times but i am going through the change. I have a under active thyroid to so that complicates things. I am doing research as part of a counselling degree which is on "how diabetes affects Anxiety and Depression" and if diabetic nurses should be trained in counselling and offer a service for diabetics. My so was diagnosed 2 years ago as type 1 after suffering OCD for several years and was told that this was caused by low sugar or spikes. This inspired my research as no doctor has ever said this and no evidence to suggest this. I am looking for responses from people to aid my research and as i am going through the change with hot flushes and sweats can empathise with you and ask if counselling should be available.
     
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  12. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    Hello @brittyb - I like the idea of the research. I think Anxiety and Depression is quite common in a lot people with Diabetes, but it won't be admitted? I certainly suffer with it and I am treated with it by my GP with tablets, a few times I have felt like "chucking in" the towel, as regards the stress with Diabetes. So, Yes - Diabetic Nurses ought to be trained in it. :)
     
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  13. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi, yes you are right although the poster didn't imply it was very high but could have been.
     
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  14. Burg

    Burg Type 2 · Member

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    For many many years I suffered night sweating.I would wake up in the early hours with my upper body and head bathed in sweat.Not every night, but it happened even with moderate air temperatures.

    On discovering my diabetes (type 2) I immediately cut out the carbs and sugars.From that day on my night time sweating ceased.We are coming to the end of summer down here in NZ and I have not had one night sweat.

    This change was not a gradual thing.It was one of the changes that happened the day I changed my diet.
     
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  15. Maggie/Magpie

    Maggie/Magpie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome @christopher52,
    Before I was diagnosed with diabetes last year I was experiencing a lot of cold sweats several times a day/night. I was eating a lot of carbs and sugars at the time as I'm a binge eater and one of my meds was making me ravenously hungry all the time. Menopause and everything obvious was ruled out. It was only when I was diagnosed and reduced the carbs and stopped sugar that the sweats stopped therefore the two must be related.

    As for the diabetic nurses taking on counselling concerning depression, I feel its important that they have awareness training about depression and how/where to sign post their patients showing signs of depression and know about treatments. But unless they have a particular interest in the links between diabetes and depression and want to counsel in those fields and are happy to do the extra training then I feel counselling should be left with proper psychotherapists and counselors. People can spread themselves too thin and then not be particularly good at anything but think they are and then do more damage than good. Having had counseling from both with a person who is a cpn with counselling training and good intentions but are hopeless and two psychotherapist one in my opinion good and one bad, I'd take the psychotherapist every time. But like in every field there can be good and bad and some suit some personalities over others, or use different methods to suit different situations. At least a psychotherapist has many methods at their finger tips and use them every day, where as a diabetic nurse who dabbles in and out of the role as needed (and I mean no disrespect to them for many are excellent in their field) is not going to have the same knowledge base, as much experience or capability or be so up to date as some one doing it full time and as their specialist field. There's also the issue that those being counselled need to be in the right head space and receptive to the counselling for it to work in the first place.

    Sorry for the long post and rant. At the end of the day I'm only one voice and I'm sure there will be many who disagree with me out there. But both side of these things need to be considered.

    Anyway, @christopher52, good luck with your diabetic journey. If you need to know anything just ask, were all here to help.
    Maggie
     
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  16. debbiedoodles

    debbiedoodles Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello @christopher52
    I am experiencing fluctuating sweats then get cold. Often during the evening or night. My control not great my hba is currently 56. However I was a bit better with vlc diet so now I'm back from my hols I'm going to be working on it. Regards
     
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  17. jonbvn

    jonbvn Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Before T2 diagnosis and starting LCHF I used to suffer with profuse frequent sweating. It used to be worse in bed. My pillow would be soaking in the morning.

    Since I've lost weight and got my BG under control this has stopped completely. It is difficult to know whether this is due to the weightloss, reduced BG or both.
     
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  18. Ultramum

    Ultramum Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Low carb eating seems to have reduced my hot times - now if I feel hot and check my BG it is often slightly raised so I suspect there may be a link
     
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  19. Chook

    Chook Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Same here.

    Problem is, once I'm awake then I always seem to need to have a tiddle and then I wake the dogs who think I'm going to take them for a walk and once I've re-settled them I'm properly awake and can't get back off to sleep I've been sleeping so much better since getting my BG down - and so have my dogs. :rolleyes:
     
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  20. Speedbird

    Speedbird Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That's funny, only because you could be telling my story. X
     
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