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Our 5y old son refuses the injections

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Adrisr, May 17, 2020.

  1. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    My granddaughter was given a Rufus bear, with colourful injection sites sewn on.
     
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  2. Geordie_P

    Geordie_P Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    This actually looks very sensible- maybe if you keep to this, things will normalize after a while
     
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  3. EddieA12

    EddieA12 · Member

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    I fear the people that are saying ‘just do it!’ don’t have a 5 year old son. I have a son who is 4 and getting him to wash his hair in the bath can cause uncontrollable tears, so image how inserting a needle into you, after previous experiences of pain would go down!
    After speaking to my mother, she told me that I was the same and that as soon as I could do it myself it all went away! I was 5 when I started injecting myself.
    I’m sure the thought of a 5 year old using a needle may be a bit much, but if if understands it and can control it, that could really help. As I mentioned before, if the needle starts to go in a causes pain, then he can withdraw it and try somewhen else...
     
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  4. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    I have to admit Lucy, your friend has offered up a fried slice of gold..!

    I would empathise that we are all individual regarding emotions involved ruling the logic. & no parent wants to hurt thir kid.

    As a kid myself just out of hospital (a week.) & getting to grips with it eased the new family dynamics in my house.. Could even connect with what my mum personally went through.
    I started off under supervision drawing up my own insulin, next step my mum injected but I popped down the plunger on the glass syringe.. The hardest step was indeed pushing the needle into my leg?

    OK, I just barely turned 8. As my mum said years later, I had to deal with it on my own at some point.
     
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  5. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I was diagnosed at exactly the same age, but luckily my mother splashed out and bought disposable plastic syringes instead of the NHS glass reusable ones that she had been using. I remember being very proud that the hospital did not even get me to practice on oranges first but I was able to go straight to injecting myself. But 8 is very different to 5 in terms of rationality and understanding.

    However, back on topic.
    @Eddie12 has a point that injecting yourself is less painful, as you can move the needle if you hit a bad spot. Even after 50 years of self injections, I have to look away if a nurse gives me a flu jab or takes blood.
    Have you tried using a freestyle libre? Not sure whether this is advisable for young children, but it could cut down the need for finger pricking significantly.

    There are usually a few children every year who die of diabetic ketoacidis before they get a diabetic diagnosis and life saving insulin. I sadly suspect that during the COVID crisis this figure will go up. (This is not a criticism of your understandable desire to not traumatise your son, just an observation to try to keep things in perspective.)

    I'm afraid I think that @lucylocket61 's friend is right, you can't negotiate on insulin injections, but agree that the rufus bear (supplied by JDRF) might help. They have a phone number, though I don't know whether it'll be manned in these covid times.
    https://jdrf.org.uk/about-us/contact-us/

    Good luck again. I cannot imagine how awful it must be to nurse a child through the very early years of diabetes. Things really should get better when he is older.
     
  6. Mike d

    Mike d Type 2 · Expert

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    Read the @lucylocket61 advice. You're searching for the easiest solution that suits you and your 5 year old, but perhaps not the hardest that suits your son when it's called for if the other plans fall through.
     
    #26 Mike d, May 17, 2020 at 11:46 PM
    Last edited: May 17, 2020
  7. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My friend I quoted has two type 1 diabetic sons, she said thats what she did with them at that age.
     
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  8. Adrisr

    Adrisr · Newbie

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    Once again I am very thankful for your replies
    To come back on a few questions:
    No we dont use insulin from the fridge so it’s not too cold
    We suspect potential allergy to his long lasting insulin, we are changing now so hopefully it will help
    We are contacting the hospital to see if maybe a psychologist could talk to him.It would be nice if he could meet other diabetic children but these days it’s complicated.

    We are trying to use a mix of the advice you gave, being kind with him but firm with no negotiation, hopefully we will find the right balance.

    Thanks again
     
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  9. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Adrisr, don’t forget to remind yourselves you are doing a great job and it will eventually sort itself ! This is hard enough in normal times never mind the strange world we are living at the moment. Remember to take time for you :)
     
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  10. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi,

    Your son one day will appreciate your parenting.
    Sometimes the role reverses with parents & the child in the advanced years.. Now that's another chapter.
     
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