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Type 1 Pasta

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Liftupjoe, Jun 12, 2019.

  1. Liftupjoe

    Liftupjoe Type 1 · Active Member

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    To count your carbohydrates for pasta, do you weigh before or after cooking it ????
     
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  2. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I've cut it out but prior to this I would go by the dry weight listed on the packet.
     
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  3. Rokaab

    Rokaab Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Depends what it shows on the packaging, for instance Asda now show all their nutritional values for pasta by cooked weight (and its says that's what its showing) - and yes I have whinged at them about it
     
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  4. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Hi, I found this : but there are other links if you google, good luck.

    I just weighed 2 ounces of dried spaghetti. After cooking, it weighed 8 ounces.
    [​IMG]


    Question: I just weighed 2 ounces of dried spaghetti. After cooking, it weighed 8 ounces. I suppose pasta is filled with water, which makes it weigh more. I'm totally confused as to what I should eat or rather how much to eat while dieting. -Denise

    Answer: Good observation! This phenomenon of foods weighing more after cooking than before occurs for a wide variety of foods, including pasta, rice, couscous, quinoa, lentils and dried beans. And you’re right—they weigh more after cooking because they have absorbed the water, broth or other liquid they were cooked in.

    Your frustration in trying to monitor your portions is certainly understandable. It does not always help when food labels give nutrition information for dried portions (such as on a pasta box, where nutrition facts are often given for a 2 oz. dry serving) rather than for cooked portions. To make things a little easier, it may help to stick to either measuring dry or cooked weights—rather than measuring both. It may also help to focus more on volume servings sizes (i.e., 1 cup, 2 Tbsp) of pastas and grains, because these can be better estimated visually—useful when dining out and your kitchen scale isn’t handy! For example, you can measure one serving of pasta as 1 cup, 2 oz.-weight dry, or equivalent to half the size of your fist or one cupped palm. The same measurements apply for rice. To learn more about serving sizes (both in dry weight and in cooked volumes) of various foods, visit the MyPlate website. And to learn more short-cut tips for estimating portion sizes (i.e., 1 oz. of cheese = the size of a pair of dice), check out the Cleveland Clinic’s cheat sheet.
     
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  5. Knikki

    Knikki Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    OK question @Robinredbreast or others.

    If say 2oz of pasta equals y gram of carbs.

    Does that mean that after cooking the now 8oz of pasta is y x 4 gram of carbs?

    Or just go off what it says in the packet in the first place, which most of the time is uncooked?
     
  6. Rokaab

    Rokaab Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    No, because all the extra weight is basically just water :)
    Its got the same amount of carbs it started off with (ie. y) its just got more water now.

    Personally I hate it when they show cooked weight, cos the amount of water they absorb depends on how long youve cooked it for thus changing its's weight depending on if you stopped it cooking a bit soon (ie the well everything else is done now and getting cold now, so 1 min less wont make much difference) vs the oops I left it on too long.
     
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  7. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Defo off the packet. Most of the time the packet will be dry weight....as @Rokaab has said the weight after cooking is water :)
     
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  8. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  9. Knikki

    Knikki Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    How would I factor in? Not sure as I'm not a fan of cold pasta or pasta salads so for most of the time I eat fresh cooked :)

    But for me, if I say ate, let's say, 90 gram carb of pasta, if I injected enough insulin to cover all that I would be hypo within 3 hours, roughly. So what I tend to do is split dose which can be any sort of ratio depending where my mmol starting point is.

    It's all a bit of trial and error, but makes things fun :)
     
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