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Police Cells And No Insulin.

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by dmcx3x, Aug 7, 2018.

  1. derry60

    derry60 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    You certainly have a complaint to be made, having no insulin.
     
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    #21 derry60, Aug 8, 2018 at 12:07 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 10, 2018
  2. Perox74

    Perox74 Type 1 · Newbie

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    I had the same thing happen to me, I got arrested for an argument I had with my teenage daughter, I had never been in a police cell before this, I was treated appallingly. I was arrested around 10pm taken to the station and put in a cell I explained I needed my night time insulin and was told I had to wait till the on call doctor got there, the doctor arrived around 2am and my sugar level was tested it only registered as ‘high’ on my meter which meant it was way over in the 30’s! I was allowed to take my insulin and was taken back to the cell in which they left the door open to watch me, I had to drink a lot of water and obviously needed the toilet frequently, I had a male officer watch me and so was too embarrassed to use the toilet and had a melt down, my sugar levels would not come down so I was eventually taken to hospital at 4am in the morning. I made a complaint but it got me nowhere. I was disgusted by the way I got treated and up until that day I have always had respect for the police and the job they do but after my experience I hate them, they was allowed to get away with the way the treated, I hope you get somewhere with your complaint. best wishes
     
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  3. StewartH

    StewartH Type 1 · Active Member

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    Please go for the complaint. I had a similar experience many years ago. I was arrested because I was behaving as if drugged but tested negative on the breathalyzer. I was severely hypoglycemic. By the time I got to the police station I realized what was happening and told them I needed sugar and there was some in my bag. They said that a doctor had been called and I could not have anything to eat or drink until he had taken a blood sample...to detect illegal drugs. I protested in vain for about 3 hours until the doc eventually arrived! The incident shattered my illusions that the authorities are well trained and have our best interests at heart. It seems they still have not learned..so please do complain. Good luck.
     
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  4. cassie091

    cassie091 Type 1 · Active Member

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    This person was hyper (high blood sugar) not hypo (low blood sugar) as some are suggesting but the consequences could have been equally disastrous as in time he/she could have become comatose. A high glucose coma takes a relatively long time to develop but a hypoglycemic coma can occur very quickly.
    I understood that insulin dependent diabetics have to be checked every 30 minutes. This ruling came about because hypoglycemic prisoners were erroneously diagnosed as being drunk and some died in the cells. Hypoglycemic behaviour does often mimic drunkenness.
    Clearly the police at the station where this person was taken need to be retrained in the care of prisoners.
    This incident is totally unacceptable. Take up the fight! Contact everyone you can think of - the press - your MP - social media to try to ensure this never happens again.
    BUT there is a rider to this. No type 1 diabetic should delay an insulin injection. Have your injection and then, if food is not available, eat a glucose tablet or two or three. But you must take your insulin.
     
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  5. adcurtis100

    adcurtis100 Type 1 · Member

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    would have presumed that when you where booked into custody that the police would have found your insulin pen so they would have known you where diabetic also they should have asked if you had any medical conditions add that to the fact that you told them you needed insulin they denied you your medication for near on hours would could have lead to a diabetic coma , organ damage and possible death then id stay you have one big complaint and possible criminal charges AGAINST the officer/s involved due to not following custody procedures
     
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  6. adcurtis100

    adcurtis100 Type 1 · Member

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  7. cxl0702

    cxl0702 Type 2 · Member

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    They have a duty of care darn right they need to be brought to account. Mainly so they become diabetic aware and some poor sod does not die of a hypo they shove in the drink tank.
     
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  8. adh398

    adh398 Type 1 · Newbie

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    This is an absolute disgrace - particularly as there seem to be no grounds for your arrest let alone detention - whilst it is reasonable to not allow a prisoner to have any medicines in their cell whilst unattended due to the risk of suicide attempts, if they failed to let you test your blood sugar, failed to understand your need of a prescribed drug to keep you alive then they have failed in their duty of care and may also have broken a law. Please do complain to the IPCC - write also to your MP (regardless of which party they are a member of) as they can raise this point at PMQs as the PM is a type 1 diabetic and would understand the risk to your life that has been forced upon you in your case.
     
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  9. pete whyatt

    pete whyatt Type 1 · Member

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  10. pete whyatt

    pete whyatt Type 1 · Member

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    I , as a type 1 diabetic for 54 years, believe that in the same circumstances I would make a formal complaint about the actions of the Police in this instance. This is not only for yourself but also for other diabetics who may find themselves in the same position as yourself. If the facts are exactly as you said, then you have every right to complain.
    Firstly the police have a duty of care when you were in detention, and this they appeared to have not done.
    Secondly they must give a name and shoulder number to any person who has a reasonable right to ask for it.
    Thirdly they should have a reasonable cause to have arrested you and they must advise you of this reason.
    To deny you of medical care during your detention is against the police regulations, as is taking insulin away from you, or denying access to medical requirements from you.
    If I was in your position, I would firstly make a formal complaint, in writing to the Chief Constable of the area in which the arrest was made. This will be online.
    Secondly send a copy of the complaint to the Police and Crime Commissioner of the force in question with a covering letter saying you want him or her to act on that complaint, details will be online.
    Thirdly write to your MP by copy of the complaint.
    Finally complain to the I P O C who have taken over from the IPCC, details online.
    The facts you complain about must of course be truthful and not exaggerated in anyway.
    I think from the reaction of people here it is a disgrace that this happened and the circumstances could have been very serious indeed.
     
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  11. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    If she'd died in custody (thank God she didn't) the next one in jail would have been the cop. I'd be making noises to the media BEFORE the police once the entire episode has been memorialised
     
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  12. Notorious

    Notorious Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    She delayed the injection because she'd been drinking. Alcohol can make your blood sugar drop, as I'm sure you are aware. In any case, some people have gastroparesis, which may mean needing delayed dosing, so it's not always a good idea to take insulin before food.
     
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  13. Cartha

    Cartha · Newbie

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    I had a similar experience with the police after being arrested. My diabetes has only recently been diagnosed, and I take tablets three times each day for it. I also take tablets for hypertension, cholesterol, and gout. I had a banana for breakfast and was arrested around 9:30am. I was released about 10pm after having nothing but water all day, and my meds around 7pm after they got me a doctor. I wasn't allowed any meds before seeing the doctor. Luckily I don't suffer hypers or hypos.

    If I were you I would complain. A lot of people without experience of diabetes don't take it seriously, I think because we all seem to look ok.
     
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  14. pdmjoker

    pdmjoker Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    @dmcx3x Sorry to read this - how awful for you! A really horrible experience...

    I gather that CCTV evidence is only kept for a max of 30 days so you should act promptly before it is erased. I don't know how long a police station keeps their CCTV recordings.

    Hope you get the apology you deserve...
     
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  15. Kyambala

    Kyambala Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Good evening dmcx3 - you have been given some very good advice on this Forum - the most importantant is writing letters - write to Her Majesty the Queen (she will no read it but her secretary will forward your complaint to the Home Secretary and he will take action because it comes from the Queen); write to the Prime Minister (she will not usually reply but her secretary will forward your complaint to the Home Secretary as well); write to the Home Secretary his secretary will send you a formal reply; write to your MP - he will reply but will only sympathyse - write again to him DEMANDING ACTION and that QUESTIONS are asked in Parliament: then write to the Chief Constable and every other person that others have advised.

    Then get your solicitor to write to the Chief Constable threatening LEGAL ACTION and demanding the names of the responsible duty staff. - You will cause sheer PANIC amongst everybody in the local police station because the Queen, Prime Minister, Home Secretary, your MP, Parliament, and everybody else who receives TAX PAYERS money is afraid of public opinion.

    Best of luck - go for it girl (or rather go for them).
     
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  16. Kyambala

    Kyambala Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    By taking this sort of action you are helping to ensure that other Diabetics are not treated so badly
     
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  17. ElenaP

    ElenaP · Newbie

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  18. ElenaP

    ElenaP · Newbie

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    Hi, I'm wondering if you had your BG meter with you? How often were you allowed to test your BG?
     
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  19. JJFDiabetic

    JJFDiabetic Type 2 · Newbie

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    My dear,
    I believe that you have come across a problem that needs to be highlighted. It really is not important why you were there or when last you took your insulin; the important thing is, you were a diabetic caught without insulin. What's worse, you were put in a situation where your medication was withheld. Please do not hold back. The next person this happens to could die. Your Prime Minister Theresa May is a diabetic. Please write to her and explain with as much detail as possible what happened, and let her bring this point up with her Minister of Police. It sounds like it is a case of training being needed, after which the police will know what to do with diabetics. This is bigger than getting someone in trouble. In today's England, this should absolutely not be happening.
     
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  20. TTTE

    TTTE Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely you must complain and take it the full distance. What they did endangered your life. The next person to receive this abuse might not be so lucky to survive

    Complain now. Start with the duty superintendent at the station concerned. If that gets you no where take it direct to your forces chief constable
     
    #40 TTTE, Aug 10, 2018 at 12:48 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 10, 2018
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