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Pre diabetes & metformin

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by alisonbigbird, Oct 20, 2015.

  1. alisonbigbird

    alisonbigbird Prediabetes · Member

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    I have just been diagnosed pre diabetic with 47mmol test results. Not given any diet advice except I dont need sugar, and not refered for further clinics etc. I have stopped having any added sugar foods, and cut out white pasta/bread.

    I am 3 weeks on metformin (now 1500mg daily) working towards 2000mg per day longterm.

    I have a personal trainer twice weekly and look after house and children rest of time. GP talked like the weight will fall off me, but I still cannot lose any.

    Feeling very down that despite all my efforts I am still over 16st. I have been just 13.5st for nearly all my adult life, but have ballooned 2st in just a year and had completely normal blood sugar levels last year.

    Please help
     
  2. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Hi @alisonbigbird
    As a prediabetic, there are more ways than you think to lose some weight.
    Literally everything you eat has a effect on our condition, so the thing to do is cut out the baddies, which is sugary stuff, like you say and carbs! Yes carbs!
    If you reduce your carbs sufficiently, then your Hba1c Levels, the 47 you quoted will lower and you can if you are careful go back to normal levels.
    If you eat a smaller plate size and keep up the good exercise, you should lose weight as a bonus.

    I've tagged @daisy1 to give you the newcomers welcome information.

    Also read the low carb forum for ideas on foods and recipes that we recommend.

    Hope that helps.
     
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  3. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Hi and welcome,

    Yes, I'm afraid carbs are the enemy in both weight issues and blood sugar levels. (They all convert to glucose once inside the body, so are almost the same as eating sugary foods) Try to reduce all portion sizes of potatoes, rice, pasta, bread and cereals plus things made with flour like sauces, soups etc) Even the brown varieties convert to glucose, albeit a little slower, but none the less, they do eventually.

    You may find the Metformin will help as it works as an appetite suppressant so you may feel less hungry.

    Good luck and let us know how you go on.
     
  4. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    @alisonbigbird

    Hello Alison and welcome to the forum. Here is the information we give to new members and I hope you will find it helpful in addition to the advice above. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will have an answer for you.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find over 150,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates

    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes-and-whole-grains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to bloodglucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  5. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome.

    I'm sure with reducing carbs and portion sizes you will lose weight, unless there is a medical condition or medication affecting things. Do you know why you gained weight quickly? Sometimes there can be a medical reason, and if that's the case, it makes sense to tackle that in conjunction with reducing carbs and portion sizes.
     
  6. alisonbigbird

    alisonbigbird Prediabetes · Member

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    The doc said i gained weight because of the pre diabetes - laying down loads of glucose as fat? My liver is making glucose at factory rates and my pancreas thinks i need sugar and so i crave. Thats wot i can remember.
     
  7. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, that's basically what happens when someone develops insulin resistance/glucose intolerance then prediabetes. However, you said you had normal blood glucose levels then that and your weight rapidly changed, which seemed a bit unusual. It may be perfectly normal for it to happen that way, I'm not sure.
     
  8. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Yes, he isn't wrong with that basic thought, (although it is a lot more complicated), so to counteract this it is wise to reduce the glucose in your system and you do this by cutting down those carbs.
     
  9. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Just wondered why the doctor has put you on Metformin when you are prediabetic. I have been prediabetic for a few years now but have never had Metformin my doctor will only prescribe that once someone actually has diabetes
     
  10. alisonbigbird

    alisonbigbird Prediabetes · Member

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    I scored 47mmol and he said if i was 48mmol i would be diabetic. I didnt question the meds, i have had a very bad year - aneamia and sleep apnea on top. I am 16.5st and cannot lose weight. Too desolate and sad to care really!
     
  11. geoffh

    geoffh Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've struggled to lose weight for the last 20 years - going low-carb is the only thing that's consistently worked for me. After only a couple of months I'm the lightest I've ever been (since my teens!) and feeling great.
    It can be a mental struggle to begin with (working out what you can eat) but I'm loving it.
    Do give it a try - look at it as a new start. :)

    And do ask lots of questions here - that's what we're here for!
     
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  12. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    I understand Metformin isn't licenced for GPs to prescribe it for pre-diabetics, but in your case he may have decided to prescribe it anyway because you need to lose a lot of weight (it is an appetite suppressant) and you are very close to being diabetic.
     
  13. seadragon

    seadragon Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I was offered metformin as a pre diabetic so they are definitely able to prescribe it. Mind she also wanted to put me on statins which would probably have upped my BG levels to diabetic levels fairly quickly. I said no to both as wasn't overweight and no way was I touching statins. Giving both seems daft anyway as they hand out one pill to reduce BG (metformin) and another (statins) which has the known side effect of raising BG levels. As far as I m concerned taking neither leaves me in the same place levels wise with no risk of side effects! Plus I objected to being treated (statins) for something I didn't have.
    The weight gain OP describes may have been a result of becoming glucose intolerant/insulin resistant. The best and easiest thing for weight loss does seem to be the low carb high fat lifestyle with the added benefit of reducing strain on the pancreas as les need for insulin. Also excess insulin causes weight gain so reducing need for insulin by reducing carbs helps to stop the body storing so much glucose as fat.
    You might want to be aware that dietary advice from NHS is not always very good. You are better off her on the forum and there are a number of threads on diet and exercise. A case in point: my mum is diabetic. In hospital for a clinic and given tea and a couple of plain biscuits. A nurse came by and said she shouldn't be having the biscuits and offered to make her toast instead. For most people toast is going to be rather worse for blood sugar levels than biscuits as bread has a higher glyceamic index than table sugar so would cause a bigger raise. The nurse had no idea.
     
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  14. chrisw22

    chrisw22 Don't have diabetes · Newbie

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    I was told I was glucose intolerant ( fasting 6.7) not sure of the 2 hour glucose test ,but I presume it must have been highish. I also was very fond of red wine The doctor read me the riot act and told me to stop drinking and put me on metformin. I was told by the diabetic nurse to cut out sugary foods and eat loads of fruit etc throughout the day. I felt terrible and couldn't take the stomach pains etc. Another doctor took me off Metformin and told me to treat carbs as my enemy and to exercise. I joined a gym and do 15 minutes cardio and 45 minutes of weights, 3 times a week and followed a basic version of the south beach diet. In 2 months I've lost weight going from 17st 11lbs to 15st 7lbs and feel great. My worst reading before breakfast was 6.3 after having wine, cake and pudding 6 hours earlier and my best reading 4.6...on average it's 5 - 5.3. I know my levels are not as scary as most peoples but I can only share what works for me. I also read that bigger muscles draw more glucose out of the blood,not sure but it seems to make sense. I've now reintroduced wholegrain rice and pasta and 1 slice a day of warburtons wholemeal bread (lowest carb/ sugar).I wouldn't say I'm exited by my diet but I can live with it. Hope some of this info helps keep your chin up...good luck .
     
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