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Pump When Flying

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by jimbocolvie, Jul 9, 2018.

  1. jimbocolvie

    jimbocolvie Type 1 · Member

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    Hi all, I know this has been asked before but am unable to fund the thread.

    I am due to fly to Cyprus but was wondering if people disconnect their pump while taking off and landing as have heard that the pressure change can result in insulin being pushed through.

    Any hints would be great
     
  2. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

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  3. novorapidboi26

    novorapidboi26 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I haven't read all the articles but my personal experience has been that no extra insulin has been delivered....

    the tubing and reservoir is essentially its own wee vacuum and so I wouldn't expect to see much effect from any outside pressure variations....
     
  4. jimbocolvie

    jimbocolvie Type 1 · Member

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  5. Chowie

    Chowie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I fly almost once a week. For the first couple of times I disconnected, suspended and not even a drop of insulin appeared, nor was air sucked back into the tubing, now about flights 25 latter I leave it all connected an no problems
     
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  6. dancer

    dancer Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I flew to Italy a fortnight ago. I forgot to disconnect for take off and went low during the flight. Today I flew back home and disconnected just before take off, till the seatbelt light went off. Some insulin did come out (but not a lot). I am insulin sensitive so probably that amount would have sent me hypo. I disconnected again when the seatbelt sign came on for landing and, as we descended, the insulin was sucked back by about an inch. When we landed, I used fill cannula to get rid of the air.
    I will certainly make sure I disconnect tubing for any future flights.
     
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  7. Chas C

    Chas C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    From a scientific perspective you cannot compare a sealed system to an unsealed system as the pressure impact would be greater on the unsealed one (i.e cannula removed). I'm not so insulin sensitive so any perceived impact is not noticeable for me.
     
  8. Louise M

    Louise M Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for info , flying in morning.
     
  9. aphex2k

    aphex2k Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Flown heaps. Never had a problem. Australia to uk and back. 3 times. With young kids. Just remember you might be in a different time zone so adjust your pump and glucomer accordingly. And keep your Jelly Beans handy.
     
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  10. Tonto73

    Tonto73 · Member

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    I fly most weeks and don’t disconnect. The cabins are pressurised and you are essentially on a closed circuit ( fluid logic prevails ). I work in drug delivery technology and can’t think this would ever be an issue.

    If you are in a jet fighter and a pressure suit it might be different.

    Relax and enjoy your trip. ;-)
     
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