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Reactive hypoglycemia and high reading normal?

Discussion in 'Reactive Hypoglycemia' started by Emile_the_rat, May 27, 2016.

  1. Emile_the_rat

    Emile_the_rat Type 1.5 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, I have reactive hypoglycemia, and my bloodsuger seems to drop pretty fast as a result of high blood suger.

    Now my blood sugar seem to be at top 15-30 mins after eating, and usually crash within an hour if I eat bad (high glycemic food).
    I have several readings above 14-15 mmol after eating, but it use to fall/crash rapidly afterwards, and it will get below below 3.9 mmol pretty fast (1-2 hours after I eat) as a result of bad food, or not eating often enough.
    When I first were diagnosed, 12-15 months ago my bloodsugar would be at it highest (12-14 mmol) after 60-90 minuts, and I would crash in a hypo 2-3 hours after eating. So it seems like my insulin have started to work overtime after the last months, and that my top/highest reading have slightly elevated. Does anyone else here with hupoglycemia experience similar high reading, and fast drop in blood glucose? Is it normal, nothing to worry about?

    I am averange, thin, 22 year old, and uses no form for medication. My physician doesn't mean I am prediabetic because my blood sugar doesn't stay high for to long, and that reactive hypoglycemia fits better because I struggles with low blood sugar. But if anyone with reactive hypoglyemia, previous pre-diabetics or anyone has some thoughs I would really appriciate it. Guess I just feel a little at loss, and struggle to understand my body. Thanks...
     
  2. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Hi Emile, welcome to our unique group of RH ers!

    There are quite a few of us now.

    This forum is for us, those who have normal hba1c levels, yet we hyper, then hypo!

    I can relate to all your fears, your symptoms, your totally baffling pancreas what gives you too much insulin.

    You have come to the right place because we know how to get a grip of this condition and we know how to make well (near) normal.

    Your GP is uncommon because he has diagnosed without tests, usually only hospital tests can do this, and for this you need a specialist endocrinologist, so you need to get your GP to find one for you and reformer you.
    Most GPs haven't got a clue about RH!

    Have a read of our threads in our forum.
    There is plenty of information there
    If you have further questions, myself or someone who has gone through what you are will respond
    Again, welcome to us weirdos!
     
  3. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    Hello there Emile.

    Your Doctor concludes you have reactive hypoglycaemia; how did he do that? Did you have a glucose tolerance test, or did your Doctor come to his conclusion, based upon your description of your symptoms?

    Have you had tests to ascertain what your insulin production levels are, and what sort of reviewing process has your Doctor established with you?
     
  4. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    That's why I told him to get a referral.
    Only hospital tests can verify diagnosis!
     
  5. Emile_the_rat

    Emile_the_rat Type 1.5 · Well-Known Member

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    Why are my GP uncommen? I've done a couple of test, but as you probably know there aren't any futureproof tests for diagnosing hypoglycemia. As my understand were my reactiv hypoglycemia were not caused by overproduction of insulin (or high C-peptid levels). Also I don't think a glucose tolerance test would have been any use on me because my hypos usually kick in after 1 hour if I take something very high glycemic, and by the 2 hours mark be stabilized again because of glucagon (as I still has beta cells).
    My diagnosis were based on my medical story, bg readings (under 3.9), C-peptid, and my insulin respons to glucose. My C-peptid were on the lower end of normal, so my GP meant my hypos were not caused by insulin resistense, or overproduction of insulin creating cells. However bloodwork showed that my beta cells responded to glucose by over compensating and started to work overtime. My GP meant it was abnormal, but likely a concequence and effect after a heavy prednisolone cure I had taken a year prior, as my low- and high- symptoms had started some months after I've had started on the prednisolone (I were on prednisolone for 9 months, not good). So my GP thought all these test compared to my symptoms and medical story were enough to prove reactive hypoglycemia. The problem however are my high readings right after eating, which my GP finds quiet unusal for hypoglycemic people. Therefore he told me to keep tracking my blood glucose, and make a new appointment if my hypos got severe, or if my blood glucose suddenly stopped to drop.
    So well, I really trust my GP, and he really seem to understand my symptoms. I haven't even heard about reactive hypoglycemia before my GP brought it up, but he told me he had had a few patients in his past with this diagnosis, so it seems like my GP knows what's he doing. My questions are more of how common high reading are for reactiv hypoglycemic people, but I guess you kind of answered that question for me, so thanks :) Also I don't know if my readings are caused by some severe but temporary side effects after prednisolone use, or if it is chronic condition that I have to live with. And last, since I don't have overproduction of insulin, only overacting insulin, my that be a result of my body struggling too keep bg at a normal range. Anyway thanks for taking your time for answering me :) It's just so confusing and overwhelming when you don't completely understand your condition and what to expect in the future.
     
  6. Emile_the_rat

    Emile_the_rat Type 1.5 · Well-Known Member

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    My level of insulin producing cells are on the lower end, but within normal. But test have showm that my insulin overreact to glucose, causing my sudden bg drops. Might explain it in a weird way, as English aren't my former language. So please forgive me, but hopefully it is kind of understandable. But read my previous reply to nosher8355. Anyway thanks for answering my post :)
     
  7. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    Hi and welcome!

    I am absolutely delighted that your doctor has taken you seriously and investigated your situation so well!

    Many of us seem to have odd and individual insulin responses, so while you have a different reaction to some of us, you clearly have an RH response.

    Can I ask what the treatment is? Forgive me if you have already said. Can I ask if you have changed foods? :)
     
  8. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    Your post to Nosher was pretty comprehensive, thanks.

    During a Glucose Tolerance Test, readings aren't just taken at the beginning and after 2 hours, they should be taken at appropriate times during too.

    It seems, from my understanding, particularly for hypoglycaemics, is that the higher you go, the lower you rebound; almost like if you bounce a ball on the floor, the harder you propel it to the floor, the more rapridly and higher it will rebound.

    From my reading (and forgive me, as I'm not at RH sufferer, so my comment is observational), many find that managing those highs effectively manages the vast majority of the following lows. In other words, if you can achieve a slow, gentle hillock of a rise, rather than a sharp mountain shaped blood profile, the following fall will be similarly gentle. Controlling that rise is usually diet based.

    Many RH suffers who reduce their carbohydrate consumption find their symptoms abate over a period of time. Is that something you have considered or tried as yet?
     
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  9. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    @AndBreathe I agree with everything you say, except that in my experience, I have only ever had bg tests at the start and 2 hrs later for an oral glucose tolerance test.

    I guess it is cheaper that way, and unless they have specific data on what the 30, 60, 90 min results indicate, the tests would be pointless - and I think that kind of analysis is wayyy beyond my surgery.

    Think this is the difference between ideal world healthcare and the cash strapped workaday NHS
     
  10. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    Thanks for clarifying Brunneria. I thought the interval blood draw was the usual way. I live and learn. :)

    For me, all the more reason to avoid them like the plague.
     
  11. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    If i ever have another OGTT i will have a Libre sensor on my arm. Problem solved. But i realise that isnt practicable for most of us. :)
     
  12. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Sorry for my misinterpretation of your circumstances.
    I've been where you are now, and it's not nice!
    The thing about diagnosis is what I've gleaned from my endocrinologist, because tests performed in hospital only the way to confirm diagnosis.
    Your doctor is uncommon because most would not recognise the huge amount of symptoms and then test for Hypoglycaemia.
    All RH ers have a form of what is known as 'dumping syndrome' where the glucose derived from food is quickly used, probably within the first half hour and because of that our blood glucose levels rocket quickly, the initial insulin response will take out the glucose, then the glucagon, glycogen response takes over.
    That first trigger is the initial phase of digestion.
    When you have RH, the initial response is high, the hypo is certain unless you offset it by eating within a few hours depending on how quick your second insulin response is.
    This my endocrinologist calls an overshoot, this insulin response is because of the imbalance in our bodies hormones, obviously depending on which one is out of whack!
    In both cases the insulin can be quite low in intensity or high in my case!
    We are all different and we learn by discussing and discovering how differently weird we RH ers are!

    What you may not know, is how we all can live better lives.
    And it is a dramatic change in lifestyle, it's about what triggers the high blood glucose levels (hypers) and how to treat a hypo without having the bouncing ball yo yo effect on your bloods.

    So if me and you have the same condition, I'm taking as what you say, though I have every confidence that you do.
    You need to understand how to treat this condition.
    I will take you through the basics, even though we have a thread sticky in our forum.
    My trigger is food!
    I cannot tolerate grains, rice, dairy, potatoes, starchy vegetables, pasta. You may be different. I can tolerate some fruit but only small pieces through the day. Any type of sugar!
    What I eat is plenty of is protein, mainly meat, cooked natural meat, not manufactured.
    I eat a lot of salad vegetables, along with eggs and a range of foods that are very low carb. I make homemade stews, soups, curry.
    I try to cook from fresh.
    I drink plenty of black tea and water, no alcohol! No fizzy drinks except one can of diet coke a day!
    Why do I put myself through its self imposed torture, no chips, no bread etc?
    Why, because, since being on a diet that has very few carbs, I'm really really well, I have no issues of health except my weirdness when I eat carbs. For me carbs are poison and make me ill. Carbs are carbs no matter the label!
    They make me ill and will put me back into my hypo hell!
    I was dying and my endocrinologist saved my life.

    Your question about the meds you were on, I would be guessing, but it seems likely that has caused your problems.
    This is not a chronic condition, it can and I have control of it as long as I stay away from what triggers the hyper! Carbs!

    Whatever you have and I repeat, I think you do have RH, there is no cure.
    I do take a 100mg of sitagliptin, that does take the spike away from the sudden rise after eating and makes my hypo come further than normal, it is a back up, an insurance that I don't eat or drink a trigger, I have done once or twice, it may not work for you but it does for me.
    My endocrinologist is in contact with the pharmaceutical company and they are starting tests in the States, if they can find enough RH ers! He has done many tests on me and one other similar RH er in his clientele.

    Keep asking, we may not have the answers but we are good listeners and hopefully we can get your concerns sorted.

    All the best.

    Nosher.

    Are you in the UK?
     
  13. Emile_the_rat

    Emile_the_rat Type 1.5 · Well-Known Member

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    Since my hypoglycemia aren't caused by insulinoma, hyper insulinimia or too much insulin producing cells, my only treatment are through diet. Unfortunally I am failing miserable, both because I love food and sweets, and because I always fall for quick fixed and sugary foods when I get low. Of course, I know it aren't an optimal solution, but as long as I eat regular and don't skip meats I'm kind of fine :)

    The OGTT only test blood sugar at the before the test and at the 2 hours mark.
     
    #13 Emile_the_rat, May 29, 2016 at 11:58 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: May 30, 2016
  14. Emile_the_rat

    Emile_the_rat Type 1.5 · Well-Known Member

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    That's correct, it usually falls faster if I get a high reading, so preventing high blood suger makes the hypos less frequent. Only problem for me are that my blood sugar sometimes manage to stay down when eating carbs, other times it fails, giving me a high reading before my body compensate by releasing more insulin so I crash. It's weird, sometimes I can drink sodas but stay somewhat in balance, and other times even healthy foods make my blood suger wacky. But for most cases eating healty and to the right times (that seems to be important for me at least) results in lower spikes, less lows ad more stable blood sugar :)
     
  15. Emile_the_rat

    Emile_the_rat Type 1.5 · Well-Known Member

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    Well my GP first suspected diabetes, but when I describe my hypo symtoms he kind of deleted diabetes (or at least type 2) from the chart, and he were on to reactive hypoglycemia already after my second appointment, not bad, ey :)

    Well, yes foods makes an impact, but it does not seem to make a world of difference for me what I ate. Only thing that happens if I overdo carbs are higher blod suger spikes, and cause me to crash soner. Even healthy eating can give me hypos if I go for to long without eating anything.

    So I kimd of get hypos anyway if I don't ate regular. I seem to be fine from all the hypos as long as I ate regular, and at correct times.

    The biggest problem I have with carbs are that the high spikes combined with the low ones are causing a fluctuating blood sugar, that can be very exhausting at times. My body can feel kind of worn out if my blood sugar have major swings one day. So I think it is good for me to cut the carbs, but I seem to forget how bad it is as soon as I get better again. But I'm really greatful for your interest in me, and for understanding how it feels :)

    I'm from Norway btw.
     
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  16. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    One of the tests that I had was a seventy two hour fasting test, it lasted for eighty, to see what happens if I don't eat.
    My bloods didn't go from normal readings.
    The test also eliminated other conditions of the pancreas.

    Have you ever tried fasting and seeing what it does?
    I now do intermittent fasting when I'm off work.
    The reason I do this is because it gives my bodies system a rest from the grind of eating every couple of hours or so.
    It also gives my brain a rest from decisions of what to eat and saves me money!
    If I don't eat, I don't need to eat often as I should. If I start eating I have to continue to eat small meals every three hours or so.

    Fluctuating bloods are not good!
    I don't let them go out of normal range if at all possible. Very low carbing does this.
    If you don't hyper, you don't hypo.

    You can only try very low carbing for a while to see how you get on.
    Once you stay in normal range for a while, your body will switch from relying on carbs for energy and your body will get its energy from your muscle fat.
    This is called being in ketosis.
    This is where I live and its a great place to be.

    Knowledge is the key to unlock your future health and get control of this condition.

    Best wishes.

    I might have to learn some Norwegian, so I can greet you properly!
     
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