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Reactive hypoglycemia .. !?

Discussion in 'Reactive Hypoglycemia' started by Ayed447_, Apr 9, 2017.

  1. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    No, it is not in diabetic range, in truth, it couldn't be any better.
    That small rise is normal and nothing to worry about!
    It seems that the portion of oat bread is good for you.
    But keep testing!
     
  2. Ayed447_

    Ayed447_ Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Man you scared me yesterday.. couldn't sleep ..

    I had several tests for breakfast lunch dinner


    Almost all oh them

    Before meal not like 2hrs

    Especially one day In the morning
    It was 67 - 2hrs I think in the 80s
     
  3. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru

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    Hi Ayed, sorry I haven't been back earlier. I have stopped recieving notifications when people post on this thread, so I didn't know that you had done your oat bread experiment. :)

    Yes, I agree with @Lamont D that the oat bread looks OK for you to eat, in that portion size. I am very happy for you! :)


    I promised to get back to you with some images of how RH affects us, with different amounts of carbs. I store all of my pictures on a website called Photobucket, and the site is down at the moment. :banghead: So I am going to try and get some old pictures that I have posted on the forum together for you to look at. :)

    Here is a pic of when I had an RH hypo after eating some Pringles:
    [​IMG]
    I talked about it on this thread:
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/reactive-hypoglycaemia-hypo-on-libre-screen.103695/

    Can you see how my blood glucose went high at about 8pm (after eating the Pringles, and then dropped sharply until just before midnight? The red part of the line shows the hypo. The lowest reading was at 2.8mmol/l

    The reason I wanted to show you this is because it was a small amount of carbs, but I ate them on an empty stomach, so my blood glucose shot up fast, then dropped again quickly. The quick drop made me feel tired and ill, and I fell asleep. The hypo happened when I was asleep. The following day I felt ill again. My arms and legs ached, and I felt as if I had the flu. I felt better the next day.

    This next picture is another occasion when I ate carbs. This time, it was a big celebration meal with my family. I ate bread and rice and cakes (probably about 80g of carbs), but I also ate meat and vegetables, and the whole meal probably took 3 hours.
    Can you see how my blood glucose goes up as high as the last picture, but it does not come down so fast.
    And notice how it gently goes back to normal, instead of dipping into RH?
    I still ate far too many carbs, but I controlled the RH by eating all the meat and vegetables at the same time as the carbs, which made my body digest the food more slowly.
    upload_2017-4-12_15-55-29.png
    The next day I was tired and just wanted to sit around. But I felt better by the evening.

    The next picture is of when I had a normal day of low carb eating.
    [​IMG]

    Do you see how there are no sharp rises, and no quick falls. My blood glucose stays nice and steady, and I feel great. I have good energy, good concentration, and there is nothing for me to worry about.

    I have chosen these three pictures to try and show you that choosing different foods, in different portions can make a big difference to the way you feel.
    Also, eating carbs by themselves, or eating them in a meal, makes a big difference too.
    And it is the speed of the rise and fall of the blood glucose that makes us feel ill, as well as the low reading when we hypo.

    Please let me know if there is anything you don't understand, and ask any questions you like. :)

    I hope this helps.
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  4. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Brilliant!
    Thanks @Brunneria, couldn't have put it better myself!
     
  5. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru

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    Thanks @Lamont D

    Perhaps I should also say that I eat low carb every day (like in the 3rd picture).
    The first and second pictures are very unusual. I probably eat like that for 2 days a year.
    I like eating carbs, and I enjoy eating carby foods. But I hate the hypos, and the tiredness, and the aches and pains, and feeling ill and depressed and having no energy.

    Eating low carb is a pain, but it is less of a pain that what happens when I eat carbs. :D
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. Matin

    Matin Type 2 · Member

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    I take insulin. I had hypos last year. From then when I eat, sugar goes high quickly upto 11mmol for to hours , then next hour it falls quickly, to 5.5mmol. 11 to 5.5 mmol is big difference. I feel reaction now for that. Before it was maximum 8.5 or 9 then 7 then 7 also upto next eating. This setting has been broken. If I give more humalog, after two hours, it might go lower, close to 4mmol. It is risky if if I walk at that time. It is hard to manipulate Levemir at day time. Please advise
     
  7. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru

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    Hi Matin and welcome.
    this is an old thread that hasn't been used for 18 months. You would probably get more answers if you start a new thread, and ask your question there. More people should do see it that way. If you have trouble starting a thread, just let me know by posting here, and I can help you with it.

    :)
     
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