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Secondary school and type 1

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by ZACNEMMA, Oct 20, 2009.

  1. ZACNEMMA

    ZACNEMMA · Well-Known Member

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    Hi all

    If someone would have said to me back in January when my 13 year old son was diagnosed, that our biggest problems would come from school I would have said that School will be the least of my worries. How worryingly wrong I would have been.

    Zac is having an absolute nightmare of it regards School. It all came to a head yesterday when a teacher refused to let him go to the med room to check bloods as he was hypo. Zac of course did the right thing and left anyway and ate a dextrose on the way, when he got to med room he was 2.9.
    Teacher has since apologised, I sense that it was under sufferance. Staff are all being briefed and it seems that finally and hopefully that Zac will get a better level of care to what he has been subjected to.
    I am interested to know what other peoples experiences are of secondary school and diabetes.

    Emma and Zac
     
  2. Fujifilm

    Fujifilm · Well-Known Member

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    Do I take it due to health and saftey rules that he has to keep his stuff in the med room?

    If so, I think I would insist he carry his meter with him, if you can't trust his teachers to be responsible he needs to be in a position to be responsible for himself.

    Lucky he was smart enough to do what he did, whats worrying is at 2.9 he might not have made it to the med room especially if stairs were involved. :shock:

    Lets hope the teachers have got the message.
     
  3. sophsmam

    sophsmam · Well-Known Member

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    Was just going to write what Fujifilm wrote.Our daughter isn't yet in secondary school until next year apart from her insulin pen which is kept in the staff room,the rest is kept in the class room.
    that teacher should be ashamed of themselves,im glad your son had the sense to ignore him and go anyway.
     
  4. suzi

    suzi · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Emma,
    Zac's teacher should be ashamed, i'm glad you have an intelligent son who managed to avoid a potentially dangerous situation. Andrew carries his bs monitor and injection kit in his school bag at all times. The only items that are in the class storeroom are, lucozade, biscuits, hypo gel, sharps box ect. I know secondary schools are awkward, in the fact that the children have to go from class to class, there is nothing stopping Zac from carry his medication with him, after all you wouldn't expect an asthmatic to keep their inhalers in the office, they'd become unconsious if they had to walk through a building to get them. A diabetic child is no different.
    Andrew is still at primary school and yes, we experienced a few nightmares, in the second year of diagnosis, his teacher hadn't an ounce of common sense regarding his diabetes, it just wouldn't sink in how he mustn't be allowed to walk down the corridor if hypo, to phone home!! This years teacher (his 5th since diagnosis) understands that Andrew manages his condition very well, but will she be any good if an emergancy arises, i doubt it very much.
    Secondary school, well that will be a whole new challenge, and in a new country, as we are emigrating to Malta next August.
    Suzi x
     
  5. ZACNEMMA

    ZACNEMMA · Well-Known Member

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    Many thanks

    Was great to get your replies of both support and understanding. Yes Zac's meds are all kept in the med room, which sometimes can be a trek depending on where Zac is in the building. There have been many failings on the schools behalf, however they have appointed a new first aider that starts after half term. I'm hoping that this will impact and also Zac's diabetic nurse will be going in to brief all staff and make them aware of consequences.

    On a plus note Zac and I went to our first meeting today about getting the pump, it is alot to learn but Zac is definite that its the way to go for him. Looking forward.

    Emma and Zac
     
  6. sophsmam

    sophsmam · Well-Known Member

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    isn't he allowed to keep his meter with him and maybe his glucose tablets.
     
  7. glitterzoe

    glitterzoe · Active Member

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    I have been through secondry school with diabetis and it can be like a mine field, if the teachers arnt aware of whats going on then you may find some leflets and information given to the head and the head of his year help. Sometimes it gets worse when you get to work ( the best thing I have ever been told is that I am playing on my illness and its all in my head!! I am type 1!)
    As long as he keeps with the times and is open about it then no one really has a come back. :p
     
  8. mikey97

    mikey97 · Member

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    My 12 year old started secondary school in August,he carries his meter glucose tablets and digestives in his school bag at all times.In the medical room he has a box with everything he needs in it in case he forgets his meter one day or anything else there is a spare in the med room.Also when he started 1st year he was issued with a card inwhich he shows a teacher when he needs to leave the class for any reason and they can't say no to him they also send someone to go with him incase anything happens to him.
     
  9. sadiemills

    sadiemills · Member

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    i agree with all those who say Zak should have his stuff with him. my son was 14 when diagnosed, and keeps snacks and his pen and blood kit with him, with extra snacks kept in his year head's office. periodically we top them up and he's had a year like this with no probs. the meters and pens aren't dangerous to other children and i know there are year sevens in the school where my son goes, who carry their own kit with them all the time.

    best of luck in getting this sorted out
     
  10. diabetic_tigs

    diabetic_tigs · Active Member

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    Hey
    i dont know if this has changed since I was at secondary school, but I had an agreement with the school where i was actually supposed to carry my glucose meter with me at all times as well as something sweet to have if i went hypo, normally a bottle of full sugar coke.. the way both I and the school viewed it was that it was much better for me to have these with me all the time rahter than drop unconcious on my way to the med room!
    This may be a point to make to the school, hypos as we know can occur very suddenly and dramatically, he should really be allowed his meter with him, even if you have to fib a little and say he gets hypos with little warning.
    Be firm, this needs sorting! :!:
     
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