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Self Monitoring of Blood Glucose and Type 2s

Discussion in 'Community Submitted Guides & Links' started by tubolard, Apr 7, 2009.

  1. hanrahanj1

    hanrahanj1 · Member

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    Re: New to this

    I was only diagnosed on the 6th August with Type 2. up until this week have had to wait till 3/9/09 to see my Practice Nurse and that is only for a blood test, then wait for it another two weeks to have a review.

    Quite frankly i am concerned and anxious, I approached my GP Surgery spoke briefly to the nurse who curtly informed me that up until then I do not need to test. That is nearly a month by my reckoning.

    Surely if i am to learn how to manage my condition, this is not a very good start or very reassuring. MY GP surgery is not very understanding run by an old school of doctors, who have not really come into the modern world, where empathy is concerned.

    I do not reallly think i stand a chance of getting any monitoring equipment or strips. I may have a fight on my hands. I am really worried about self-testing as it is and wanted to get used to it as soon as possible. I am utterly clueless at this point.

    Anyone else in the same boat.

    Jackie H.
     
  2. helenb

    helenb · Active Member

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    Hi Jackie

    I think you posted a reply to my thread today (Frustrated and alone ....) as I too am feeling very left out by my GP. I did speak to the doctor today after writing on Monday and ringing today to follow up and have got a bit of info back from her. However, she tells me that the Diabetic Clinic usually has a 6-8 week wait (I've waited 3 weeks so far). To be honest its not helping us newbies feel positive about things is it and my doctor is just so vague. I am usually a very confident person but for some stupid reason I don't respond normally when I'm talking to her, I can never seem to say what I want to (even though I write it down too - ahhhh!). After our talk today she has now decided to put me on Simvastatin as my Cholesterol is 5.6 at the moment. I wanted to see how a change to diet helped but I got told it was best to take the meds. Seems like they can have unpleasant side effects which is a worry :cry: .

    Hopefully you'll get your monitor and strips soon, I have ordered myself one online as I need to take some control myself and I can't wait any longer in the dark about what my BG levels are.

    Hopefully some of the more experienced folks on the forum will give you some good advice as to how to tackle things.
     
  3. Graham1441

    Graham1441 · Well-Known Member

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    At first i was told i could only have strips to test twice a week, How the hell was i going to find out what does what to my BG`s.

    So i bought my own meter and strips and tested before and after everything i had to eat and drink.

    This way i found what i can and cant have and that if i do go a little over a small larger brings my BG down again.

    Graham1441 :twisted: :twisted:
     
  4. Serena51

    Serena51 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  5. paula1974

    paula1974 · Well-Known Member

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    I was diagnosed with type 2 while in hospital for a chest infection. The diabetes nurse came to see me every day (i was in for a week). She gave me a monitor and test strips and told me to test 4 times a day. When I left hosp my GP said to carry on testing and now gives me as many test strips as I like. He's also given me a spare monitor. I didn't realise how lucky I was. I took it as the norm.
     
  6. ians1

    ians1 · Member

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    Recently moved from Scotland to England and found that the GP surgery were unwilling to fulfil a prescription for test strips even though it was quite plainly recommended by a consultant as my wife is on Victoza injections as well as Gliclazide and Metformin tablets and also has renal impairment and liver damage. The graphs produced by the blood meter software clearly show she is achieving a good degree of control, but this would not be easy without the regular testing. So we too had to buy on ebay, £16 for 50 strips is quite expensive when you are on benefits. Its the PCTs that are trying to drive costs down by penalising GP surgeries who "overspend" as they see it.
     
  7. kn8ght

    kn8ght Type 2 · Newbie

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    I now feel quite lucky with my GP. I bought my own monitor and get 50 test strips a month on prescription. I have Type 2 but low blood sugars. Getting used to 4.5 now but as I drive I need to make sure my blood is at least 5 before I get behind the wheel. I would happily test once a day or every other day if I was not worried about going constantly below 4. A GP last week told me to only test twice a week! What good would that be. I do not get any symptoms of low blood sugar unless below 3 (then get out of breath and feel dizzy). My son has T1 and I use extra spaires from one of his old meters if I run out. Plus if you check out chemists they sometimes have good offers for discounted or free monitors. Or you can get freebies direct from manufacturers who want you to use their products. North East GPs are really good on prescribing and when my son attended the children's diabetic clinic he got loads of monitors free every time a new design came available.
    My point is that T2 diabetics need to test lots to find out how food and activities affect them. Once stable testing once or twice a week sounds reasonable. But as we get older, change jobs, exercise and holidays (if we can afford them!) our blood sugars go up and down. So we need a good supply of test strips. Plus I think it should be compulsory to test regularly if you drive.
     
  8. benniesmum

    benniesmum · Well-Known Member

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    My Doc says his hands are tied and, that only diabetics in danger of hypos can now have strips. He also stated, quite categorically, that as I CANNOT have a hypo as a T2, I cannot have any more test strips. When I queried this re NICE guidelines, he said he had a medical degree and 10 years experience - was I questioning his judgement?

    This is even though he is quite happy to increase my Metformin dose (due to increased Hba1c). He also won't allow me to have another Hba1C test for 6 months.
     
  9. viviennem

    viviennem Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Anyone can have a hypo, even a non-diabetic, though admittedly it's extremely rare . . .

    Have you thought about printing out the NICE guidelines as listed on the first post of this thread and reading them out to him?

    You could contact your local PALS (Patient Liaison Service - can't remember the exact title) and talk it through with them?

    Viv 8)
     
  10. angieG

    angieG Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm type 2 on Metformin twice a day and the lowest I've been so far is 2.7, but I guess that's not a hypo as we don't get them!!
    I think we are less likely to pass out and need outside assistance than someone on insulin but I won't be testing that assumption in a hurry.
    Maybe try doing some manual work like digging the garden for the morning and have a late lunch and see how low you can get and then go back to your doctor and show him your meter!!
    Regards
    Angie
     
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