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So So Tragic

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by noblehead, Aug 15, 2014.

  1. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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  2. ohitsnicola

    ohitsnicola Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  3. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    It is terrible, we can only hope that lessons are learnt from such tragic events.
     
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  4. Yorksman

    Yorksman Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It's often not a question of learning. It's more to do with people doing their jobs conscientiously. Too much haste, too many shortcuts, too much complacency, not enough thought.
     
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  5. novorapidboi26

    novorapidboi26 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It would be an awful way to go, really sad...........poor woman and poor child and fiance.....:(
     
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  6. Cloe-1992

    Cloe-1992 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Oh dear ive just seen this article . I have no words to say . This is truly shocking :(

    My thoughts go out to the family .

    :(:(:(
     
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  7. Ali H

    Ali H Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Terrible story, what a tragedy.
     
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  8. Mazzer

    Mazzer Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    What a very very sad story, surely a blood test should have been carried out before giving her iron tablets to determine if she was in fact iron deficient. The NHS have a lot to answer for. I hope her doctor has learned a valuable lesson, to prescribe tablets without knowing the cause of her tiredness is unforgivable, he has robbed a gorgeous little girl of wonderful mother and her fiance a beautiful, loving partner.

    My thoughts go out to her family, this is a tragedy that could so easily been avoided.

    Marilyn
     
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  9. Heathenlass

    Heathenlass Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    How tragic :(:(

    And her symptoms were classic of Type 1.

    Signy
     
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  10. Adele99

    Adele99 · Well-Known Member

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    What a horribly sad story to read. As the family don't seem to be blaming the GP in any way, I took it that she hadn't returned to her GP and had just soldiered on thinking she was tired etc from being a new mum. She must have been suffering greatly with this . Its also possible she saw her GP in the early stages of becoming diabetic so a blood test wouldn't have revealed she was developing it. There isn't enough information to say otherwise.

    I remember seeing one of the GPs a few months before I was diagnosed with diabetes for tiredness and feeling a bit run down, but had no symptoms of thirst or the things which made a different GP twig at a later date that this could be a possibility.

    Hopefully lessons will be learned including more awareness in the general public. But what a terrible tragedy and price to pay for this family.
     
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  11. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    A life taken away so tragically, it's such a heart wrenching story to read. They looked such a wonderfully happy family.:)

    She showed such classic signs of Type 1 diabetes and it should of been picked up and it shows this to be a killer disease.
    My heartfelt condolences go out to all the family :(
     
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  12. 2131tom

    2131tom Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It's a tragic story that has ruined several lives needlessly, for the sake that someone, with even a small amount of medical knowledge, might have either sussed out what the problem might be, or at least arranged for some very basic and inexpensive tests to be carried out.

    Given that there's been a strong emphasis over the years on recording all individuals' medical data on computers, either by the GP or the rest of the NHS, I'm constantly surprised by how often the system fails to piece it together, to come up with some logical suggestions for a diagnoses or, at the very least, further investigation.

    It's not a new problem but I think there's far less excuse for it now than there was: Many years ago, my then father-in-law suddenly developed a problem of needing to get up frequently in the night to have a pee. He went to his GP who simply said: 'prostate', and put him on a year's waiting list (it was the mid-1980s) to see a specialist at the hospital.

    Jim didn't kick up a fuss - he wasn't that sort of man - he simply waited 6 months before he could bear it no longer, then went back to his GP and managed, with some difficulty, to get pushed up the queue.

    When he finally walked into the consultant's room, the doc looked up at him and asked: 'How old are you?' '56', said Jim. 'Have you considered this might be cancer? You're too young for it typically to be old man's prostate problems', said the Consultant.

    And so it was. Two years later, after the most horrible struggle, which I witnessed very much first-hand, my good friend and (more to the point) the grandfather of my 3 very young children, who then grew up without properly knowing him, died. He was one of the kindest and gentlest men I would ever know and he should have had so many more years ahead of him.

    The cancer he had was, he was told, 'often treatable if caught early'. Was it a lot to ask that a highly-trained and very well paid professional (the GP) should have been able to put together: young age + prostate symptoms = possible cancer = priority in any waiting list? Have we progressed so little in the past 30 years that we can't do better at what should be such simple potential diagnoses, or lay down procedures to be followed by all GPs?

    I know that any routine run by human beings will be fallible but we bang on so much about other things that hardly matter that I sometimes think we've completely lost the plot.

    Sorry, rant over. The story just touched a nerve, I'm afraid, and one that's still very raw, all these years later.
     
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    #12 2131tom, Aug 17, 2014 at 9:21 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 17, 2014
  13. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    .................... and thank you for sharing this with us, I think many have gone through similar experiences with medical professionals, take care x RRB
     
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  14. graj0

    graj0 · Guest

    It is terribly sad, whatever the circumstances, but I'm surprised at a few things. Has it really taken two years for the coroners findings to be published? The article says that she was prescribed iron tablets by the doctor but doesn't actually say what symptoms she had when she saw the doctor. If her condition was so serious that her oesophagus had rotted, that doesn't happen over night, or does it? The article also makes a point that she herself had put her symptoms down to something else, had she therefore avoided seeing a doctor. Just the fact that the oesophagus was rotten says that there would have been other symptoms. I'd like to know the full story, not what the Daily Mail want to print to get a good story. Very very sad, whatever happened.
    More awareness is a brilliant idea, I hope the story will encourage people to seek advice when there's something not right. I see there's no mention of the GP being useless, perhaps he/she did the best for the symptoms he was presented with, we'll never know if all we have is what the papers say.
     
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  15. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    I agree with you graj0 about the DM not giving a full or necessarily accurate story. I got the impression that they were publishing it to get the symptoms of T1 more widely known. As someone who ignored them then I think that's important. I see her and say 'there but for fortune'
    However, I do agree with NicolaAnne who pointed out that the baby seems to be a typical 'diabetes' baby ie macrosomic. This should have been noticed.
     
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