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Social lunch and dinner situations - How do you manage?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Shas3, Mar 24, 2019.

  1. Shas3

    Shas3 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Last night a friend invited us for dinner. Not a huge gathering, just 5 families. I was struggling to find anything that is low carb. I didn’t want to eat anything but didn’t want to look rude. Ended up eating a bit of this and that. Woke up with 7.2 this morning which is not as bad i was fearing but definitely not what i want.

    So how does one manage these delicate situations? I can’t stop socializing completely!! Nor do i want to stand out like a sore thumb.

    How do you manage? Any suggestions?
     
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  2. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    If I absolutely know that there will be very little to eat, I have dinner before I go then look for a bit of meat or fish or salad to pick at. People are surprisingly unobservant.
     
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  3. Caeseji

    Caeseji Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'll be fair, I have notified most of my friends of my status as diabetic and low carbing and they were open to it. I even said that I would bring something of my own to social functions so they they could try. Maybe try talking with them? That or you could try researching local eateries and see if any are decent for low carb stuff and invite them out there? Failing that @Resurgam is completely right there, eat before you leave and just do what you can.
     
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  4. Shas3

    Shas3 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Cool. I think i am going to do that. Last night was really a bit difficult as the menu was Indian Vegetarian and everything was Carbs. Anyway I think future i am just going to eat beforehand and then act like i am eating
     
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  5. Shas3

    Shas3 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. Sounds like the best approach. Great suggestions
     
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  6. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Vegetarian restaurants are particularly problematic - usually the only option is a salad.
     
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  7. Shas3

    Shas3 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Indeed. And for most of my life i have been a vegetarian. It does make it quite difficult. These days i am flexible- eggs, fish are regular staples... poultry is only if there is nothing else to eat
     
  8. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

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    It's difficult, but there is always something on a menu that can be eaten.... I find I may not be able to eat the whole meal, but parts of it that are low carb I will. Having small packets of nuts in the car comes in handy if you are still hungry after a night out and can be eaten on the way home. Rather then eating right before bed.

    As has been pointed out, most people I know are aware I'm diabetic and I don't eat sugar or breads, pasta, rice, desserts, pies etc. I think it is a good idea that friends know about your diet change, it helps to avoid awkward situations if they know. And makes a night out more enjoyable.
     
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  9. Caeseji

    Caeseji Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    From what I know from reading a few keto bits and pieces it may be worth if you go for an Indian again, looking at the paneer dishes because they are usually cheese based.
     
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  10. Shas3

    Shas3 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. Based on what i now think is bad advice from medical community, i kept some cookies and chocolates in my car. Time to change to nuts and maybe 90% dark chocolate! And yes, I think the best approach is to let friends know rather than getting into unnecessary dilemmas. Or bring-a-LCHF-dish for all to try and they get the idea of what to add to the menu next time
     
  11. Shas3

    Shas3 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes. I can see many Indian dishes (both vegetarian and meats) being suitable for LCHF to a reasonable extent. Paneer is one, all the chicken dishes too... but last night was peculiar as it was mostly breads, beans, potatoes.. (and for those not into Indian there was Lasagna!!). That did leave a bit lost

    The thing with Indian cuisine is potatoes are not seen as carbs but as a vegetable and we tend to eat bread (naan or chapati) with potatoes in spicy gravy. That is literally carbs with carbs!!
     
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  12. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

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    A lot of us have followed the medical dietary advice and suffered for it. Once you start learning more and more about what you are living with, the better you understand it and the diet that works best, the better off you tend to be.

    It is just unbelievable how the medical world views diet for T2 people, but it is I think starting to change due to the success people are having on LC diets. It's like a snow ball effect.

    And yeah, take a LC dish and see what they think. It can't hurt and if they don't like it, well, that's just more for you :D
     
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  13. Shas3

    Shas3 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Indeed. Even though i am new what notice is all the “organized medical bodies” seem to either rubbish or at best be very very cautious about LCHF. Nobody even go as far as a csutous endorsement. while on the other hand, among actual diabetics communities LCHF almost feels like a cult (kind of). What I don’t understand is if LCHF really has issues, why do we never seem to hear from those who tried it? Have there been any instances of people who went on it and had issues or did not meet their goals? Surely if people were unhappy they would challenge and share their experiences! No??
     
  14. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

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    I don't know in regards to people who tried LC, had issues and didn't meet goals. I can't answer that, but that can depend on how realistic goals are. From what I have seen the worst thing people seem to experience is keto flu, but it depends on what LC means to each person. Some will say 130g a day and others will choose around 20g and anywhere between that.

    The medical world takes a long time to accept a new stance on something. It can take decades to change and decades is something I don't have time to sit around and wait for, so I just do what works. I've learnt to be proactive over time with health. And I've never felt better and my blood work is dramatically better and consistently so. If what I'm doing (like a lot of people) isn't acceptable to the overall consensus of opinions in the medical world, dietician world etc and is so dangerous, then why are my results so good doing the opposite of what is recommended? It's not hard to figure out there is something seriously wrong with the diet advice T2 are give.
     
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  15. Shas3

    Shas3 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Totally
     
  16. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Speaking only for myself, I learned a long time ago that the only way to approach such things is to not care what anyone else thinks. I try to be discrete about my food choices when among others, but in the end, if there’s nothing I’m happy eating then I won’t eat. Obviously I don’t wish to offend people, but I’m not making any choices that I view as deleterious to my health just to make others feel comfortable.
     
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  17. DavidGrahamJones

    DavidGrahamJones Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Luckily all my friends have noticed my improvement in physical and mental health. When I explain that my low carb diet (not high fat) has enabled me to give up Gliclazide (which had helped me stop losing weight and in then fact gain weight), Januvia (which just made me feel ****) and Atorvastatin (the cause of muscle pain and brain fog), they are interested in what I'm doing and will ask if we are ever invited to eat.
    I found the low carb option easy to adhere to because I've had weight issues all mt life and haven't been able to eat the sorts of food that most people eat without thinking twice about it. Most people I know can't and won't do the same thing, but at least I get catered for . . . . usually.
     
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  18. Shas3

    Shas3 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Nice. I was on Metformin and Forxiga. Just came off Forxiga and don’t want to go back. In a week when i see my doc i am hoping he is happy to keep me only on Metformin or hopefully reduce the dosage!! Your experience of getting away from those drugs is impressive
     
  19. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I have found constipation as a new issue as a consequence of the dietary change. I am however managing it a bit better now by ensuring I do get certain foods or foodstuffs in the diet on a daily basis.
     
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    #19 Listlad, Mar 24, 2019 at 8:19 AM
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2019
  20. Shas3

    Shas3 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Indeed!!! I am wondering about this issue and yes... needs to be managed.. flaxseeds I understand maybe helpful??
     
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