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Sourdough Bread And Diabetes

Discussion in 'Prediabetes' started by Bigbloke48, Sep 7, 2018.

  1. Bigbloke48

    Bigbloke48 Type 2 · Active Member

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    What are people's views on Sourdough bread and diabetes
     
  2. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I ave tried quite a few real sour dough breads from independent bakeries that make it the proper way with starter dough etc and had varying results (stay away from supermarket sourdough it's not the genuine article) - there is only one from the ones I have tried that I can tolerate in small portions from a bakery about 90 miles from me - I have it as a treat now and then but not on a regular basis.

    I'm afraid it's down to the old but very true chestnut of try it and test test test to see if it's suitable for you :)
     
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  3. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Meant to say it's a Jewish rye sourdough bread I have in extremely thin slices :)
     
  4. Bigbloke48

    Bigbloke48 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Thank you. Do you know the carb values and fibre per slice please.
     
  5. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    There are some low carb breads, but they are made from high fibre high protein ingredients, just taking a normal cereal flour and making bread by any technique is not going to make it diabetes friendly.
     
  6. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry I have no idea as the ones I tried are all from little artisan bakers so will vary massively - also they were all unsliced so slices are relative (I had very thin slices that when toasted where like crisp breads, hubby has door step lices that don't fit in the toaster and have to go under the grill! Lol)

    I just tested on size (weight) and where it came from rather than carbs
     
  7. Bigbloke48

    Bigbloke48 Type 2 · Active Member

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    I was thinking that when I was reading about Sourdough but the one mde from sprouting wheat caught my attention
     
  8. Bigbloke48

    Bigbloke48 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Thanks. Ha ha. I'd be like your hubby. The big downfall is the smell when anywhere near a bakery is the smells eminating from there. Quite irresistible.
     
  9. pollensa

    pollensa · Guest

    Ultimately its bread, and whether ones personal situation tolerates to eat bread, thin thick, small amounts or more or less, its bread, and as I understand and follow the strict rule, breads made with normal flours, i.e. not almond, or coconut or pysillum husk even though sourtdough style, its is recommended suggested up to individual choice again, best not to eat, if possible, thats what I have chosen not eaten bread, white, brown, rye, wholemeal for 2 years now, instead, make the breads keto low carb with almond flour, coco flour or other on www.dietdoctor.com the very odd, I repeat odd time I indulge in special occasions.

    Thats my personal view for what it may worth, and suggestions to view super delicious alternative breads even than sourdough, then again, some people out there may say its the best alternative to others, which I have to agree it is, some may even feel eating bread is absolutely fine for them, with meds without, I always revert back, sorry, to my mentor of Dr. Fung, "dont put in" in the first place, ????

    Depends on the individual finally.
     
  10. Bigbloke48

    Bigbloke48 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hi Pollensa

    That was my understanding and what I've been trying to adhere to. I just came across an article on my searches which seemed to suggest Artisan Sourdough breads made from sprouting wheat and organic sd starter had little effect on Blood Sugar (BS)spikes.

    I'll continue to stick to abstinence so as not to take a backwards step.


    Thanks to everyone who responded.
     
  11. helensaramay

    helensaramay Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    As a baker of bread (including sourdough), I’d love to see the science behind this theory.
    The only difference in the ingredients is not “sprouting wheat”; it is the yeast.
    Sourdough uses slower activing yeast (but not so slow the wheat flour starts to sprout) gathered from “the air” so the dough needs longer to prove.
    This could result in large whole the bread so I guess, slice for slice, there may be less carbs but gramme for gramme, it is the same.
     
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  12. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    These days most bread is made using STIM yeast - I'm afraid I don't know what the acronym means, and can't find it on google - It was used in the mixes made by Lyons to get rapid proving, far faster than the usual yeasts available at the time. I did the testing so used to get samples of the ingredients, usually far larger than required - and even though a jar of each batch was kept, there was usually a lot left over, so I had loads of different things to use in my baking.
    Wheat flour would not sprout, it is too disrupted for that - and I thought that wheat which got wet and sprouted in the ear was spoiled for making bread, as the protein, gluten, was broken down - though high protein wheats might not be affected to the same extent as the ones which were grown in England several hundred years ago. Lower protein meant that the gas from the working of the yeast was not trapped in the bread and so it did not rise properly.
     
  13. Bigbloke48

    Bigbloke48 Type 2 · Active Member

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    ok . I'll try and find the link cheers
     
  14. Bigbloke48

    Bigbloke48 Type 2 · Active Member

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    From what I can remember the sourdough starter didnt have any provers in it so it took a long time to work but gave a finer texture. Just have to find the site to confirm.
     
  15. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sour dough starter has only water and good quality flour, usually rye with some spelt, the yeast comes from spores in the air that occur naturally around. (Organic flours will give you more spores naturally) Once started and fermenting as long as you feed it with flour every few days you can have your starter indefinitely, you have treat it with love.

    I knew a baker who's starter was 15 years old!

    The first proving of the bread is very long -at least 24hours.

    Real sourdough bread is absolutely nothing like any commercial bread you can buy, and is delicious! Not all breads are equal, when I do get my hands on a real proper no nonsense authentic sourdough loaf I can eat a nice slice without it affecting my bs
     
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  16. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    My grandmother used to do all her own baking and used to soak the dried fruit overnight by the hearth, then use the soaking juice to start the bread to bake the following day.
    So far I have only ever found that flour is flour and is carbs - I have to add in low carb extras to bring down the impact - this month's baking experiment, however I am thinking of trying to make a more cake like option, with almond flour, coconut flour, and eggs, with baking powder as the raising agent - just to push the options.
     
  17. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sprouting wheat brings to mind the malting process for barley.

    In brewing beer, the barley grain is moistened and allowed to germinate for a set period to start the enzyme action which converts starch to sugar and to ensure more enzymes are present. The germination is then stopped by heat before too much energy goes into the sprout, and the resulting malted barley is soaked in warm water to "mash", which is the conversion of starch into sugar by the natural enzymes (increased by the malting process) which in turn feeds the yeast which makes the alcohol.

    As far as I can tell much the same happens when sprouting wheat - it is allowed to sprout for a bit then stopped. This gives a slightly different ratio of starch to sugars and also generates other compounds which are produced during germination.

    There is no guarantee that sprouted wheat bread is made from just sprouted wheat; this may just be one component.

    So sprouting wheat may reduce the carbohydrates and increase the protein by a (very?) small amount, but so far I haven't read anything to suggest that it produces a low carbohydrate bread.
     
  18. britishpub

    britishpub Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have a very expensive bakery near where I live, and their Soughdough (costs over £3 a loaf) does not seem to adversely affect me. Some of the similarly expensive stuff from Waitrose is also acceptable.

    On the other hand the sourdough they sell in Tesco's was binned after the first slice.
     
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  19. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Have you tried your bakery's normal (that is, not sourdough) bread as a comparison?

    It could be the quality of the flour and lack of additives which is making the difference, not the proving process.
     
  20. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    • Informative Informative x 2
    #20 LittleGreyCat, Sep 10, 2018 at 2:55 PM
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2018
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