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Stress!!

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Seriously_Sax1989, Aug 17, 2014.

  1. Seriously_Sax1989

    Seriously_Sax1989 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi everyone!

    This last week at work I've been under so much stress. Basically I'm a painter and there was loads of stuff that needed spraying and where I work it's shambolic! Nothing is right: no proper heating systems or anything! Also to top it off I wasn't given adequate time to spray all these things (100 or so pieces of wood and 20 feet which needed sanding etc before paint)

    Anyway what I was wondering is how does stress affect you and what do you do to combat it as my sugar levels have been loopy! Normally they are between 6-12 before breakfast and 5-10 lunchtime... This week however been high teens all week and all day! I feel as though I've aged about 20 years lol!
     
  2. JTL

    JTL Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  3. sallymac65

    sallymac65 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's hard to say on stress really, as everyone is different. For me, if Im stressed my levels drop like anything with hardly any notice. So I work as a trainer, so I have to check before the training session that Im ok and that Im not going low, thankfully I can now do this easier with a sensor but even so. If you're going up, then why not add a bit more insulin at that time. You dont say if you're on a pump or pens? Please share.
     
  4. Seriously_Sax1989

    Seriously_Sax1989 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry I'm on pens. Basal/bolus regime. Split doses of levemir and humalog before meals.

    I had thought about taking a bit more insulin but at the rate it's going especially last week is be correcting every 2 hours which then could make me gain weight!

    I know it sounds like I want my cake and eat it (and believe me I do!) but I'm hoping there's another way to work off the stress instead of relying on insulin!

    Thanks :)
     
  5. lizdeluz

    lizdeluz Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    If there is, I wish I'd known about it before now. Stress has always been an influential factor for me and I can't get rid of the feeling that it caused my diabetes in the first place. It certainly made control almost impossible as I found that stressful issues would take precedence over everything else and stop me minimising the damage from diabetes. Stupidly, I've always had the 'ability' to hide my stress from others. People always think I'm calm! This is just a defence mechanism on my part.

    So I think you've made an important step in recognising openly what stress does to you. Most jobs involve stress, but some more than others. So looking for a job that doesn't do this to you might be part of your game plan.. Just telling yourself this might actually help you: "This isn't the only job in the world, I might just look and see what other opportunities there are".

    Obviously, you can treat your stress with extra insulin, but it's not a long term solution because, as you say, it can lead to swings, poor control and weight gain, and it's not addressing the underlying issue which seems to be, at the moment, dissatisfaction with your conditions of work.
     
  6. Seriously_Sax1989

    Seriously_Sax1989 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Good morning :)

    That sounds like a good plan, this is not the only job in the world with stress attached, I need to take a few breaths and continue!

    It's swings and roundabouts I swear lol, you finally get some sort of control and then something comes along to challenge it!

    Thanks very much, feeling positive today :) x
     
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  7. sallymac65

    sallymac65 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, would agree that actually if you're suffering stress perhaps there are other ways to de-stress and actually Im sure you're like most T1's they stress about having extra insulin and running high, means you cant do your job at all. The theory of finding other ways to destress is fine, but in practical terms you are left with a situation that needs dealing. Could you perhaps on the days that you kind of know you're going to be stressed through it add more long term insulin rather than the short acting? Or could you try doing a bit of low carb day instead in which case you're not giving any more insulin just adjusting your food intake which may sit more comfortably with you? Hope things sort themselves out for you. Sally
     
  8. Seriously_Sax1989

    Seriously_Sax1989 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I think it's a case of finding a way to keep calm to be honest, think when I wrote this I was more peed off with how it was affecting my sugar levels than being worried about the stress!

    I just don't want to rely on insulin and then feel rubbish as I've put on weight etc.

    Would be good to know how others deal with stressful times and how it affects them!

    Thanks again :)
     
  9. ArtemisBow

    ArtemisBow Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Like you I find stress at work to be one of the main drivers of my highs - I have to purposefully take more insulin on days when I know I will be stressed. This to a certain extent makes me a bit calmer, because at least I don't then stress about being too high!

    In parallel I have found yoga to be incredibly helpful - a lot of the breathing exercises are very calming and just taking a moment during a busy day to stop and think can often minimise my anxiety.
     
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  10. Seriously_Sax1989

    Seriously_Sax1989 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello, I've just booked myself into a class at the gym for Pilates, so hopefully this will have a calming effect :)
     
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  11. lizdeluz

    lizdeluz Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Stress at work is affected by so many different factors, as is blood sugar control. it's rather easy to under-treat, over-treat, try-to-ignore-and-get-by until you have a moment to think. Keep work stress in check and don't let it take over. It's good advice from @ArtemisBow. Make sure your bg control and relaxation are given priority. Hopefully if you keep this in mind, work will seem less stressful.
    Yoga has been beneficial for me too. 30 minutes or so of stretching, breathing exercise and meditation is grounding, calming, and promotes body awareness and good health at any age.
     
  12. Seriously_Sax1989

    Seriously_Sax1989 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello yes thanks to all who've replied so far very useful advice! I'm booked in for Pilates so we'll see how that goes but I've got my fingers crossed!

    Less stressful day today but still pretty manic but oddly enough I had a hypo (3.3) I'm not saying that it was definitely stress that caused this, it could've been a little too much insulin for breakfast but it was strange nonetheless!

    I think I've figured out why I get "stressed" so that's the first step! Next I need to work out a way to remain calm and keep sugars in check! :) x
     
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  13. toby64

    toby64 Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hello All,
    very good advise given, and yes we all handle stress differently, i have been a type 1 for over 50 years and for me, i use to increase my long acting insulin in small increments, and reduce my short acting to suit, i would never get to upset if my BG fluctuated all day as long as the average was under 12 on those stressful days, and when things settle down, i would return to my normal amounts. My thoughts are that you are better to have a good average than to risk hypo's chasing the highs, after all that is what your HBa1c is. We all know in this day and age it is not easy to find a job that suits our diabetic needs, and are we better to learn to deal with the cards we are delt with, and make the best of our situation. This has been my philosophy and has served me well all these years, hope this may help and best of luck with your stress levels.
    Best Regards
    Toby
     
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  14. Seriously_Sax1989

    Seriously_Sax1989 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello Toby, blimey type 1 for over 50 years! Bit of a pro then :).

    Seems to be the general consensus increasing long acting insulin, I think I'll hold off for the time being as I'm not 100% sure with what I'm doing at the moment!

    Once again, thanks everyone for tips and advice :)
     
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