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Sugar Tax

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by ladybird64, Mar 16, 2016.

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  1. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    Me I can't stand the stuff, but if you drink the whole bottle you still won't get twice the sugar of a can of coke oh and obviously I don't drink that either any more. Most kids and teenagers I know drink far more coke than Fijj well the two living in my house do any way.
     
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  2. Marley99

    Marley99 Type 2 · Member

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    Ho
    Honey sends my BSLs sky high! As does Jams.
     
  3. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    Trouble is the tax is only aimed at sugary pop and totally ignores all the other products that contain huge amounts of sugar if they really want to control the amounts of sugar being consumed it's got to be across the board concentrating on one product out of many aint going to cut it.
     
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  4. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    And not just sugar. The amount of nutritionally poor carbs some people eat is shocking. While the sugary pop might contribute to their problems, it's their food choices that have an impact too. I'm always stunned by the number of people who exist on frozen prepared food and take aways, and never seem to cook a proper meal.
     
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  5. ladybird64

    ladybird64 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm not surprised at all. **** food is cheap, a couple of generations have been raised on this, and know nothing different. Fruit is now cheaper, but it still can be expensive. If kids aren't taught how to cook, and the parents don't know how, is it any wonder they live on rubbish?
     
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  6. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    I wish the government would put proper cookery lessons on the curriculum rather than Food Technology. It's an investment in health that'd be fairly easy to do, and healthy choices could be included as part of that, including not drinking too many sugary drinks, etc.
     
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  7. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Many of us may remember Home Economics in school, it should be made compulsory as it give you the basic foundations of food and how to cook.

    But food aside the lifestyle of children is much different now to past generations, we didn't have play consoles, tv in our own room and had to walk or bike to school, we had to make our own entertainment playing outside and sport at school like cross-country was compulsory and non-negotiable.
     
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  8. ladybird64

    ladybird64 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Bit of a waffle coming, relevant though.
    My daughter had a rare syndrome, so as well as her diabetes, her diet has to be very low calorie and restricted. When she was at primary school, her last year, they had the usual end of term party. Her support teacher and class teacher were pretty clued up on her condition and came to a decision. There would be none of the usual crisps, sweets, fizzies etc - the kids would tuck into fruits and veg, plus cheese and hummus.
    I was horrified. I had visions of parents hating me, the classmates hating and bullying my daughter for making them miss out on the usual goodies. We lived in a "deprived" borough and lots of the kids came from poverty backgrounds, so the class party was really an occasion.

    Anyway, the day came. I worked in the school too and kept peeking in, expecting to see chaos and mayhem. Laughter yes, mayhem no. I finished work and popped into the classroom - the kids were happily tucking into what was on offer. I distinctly recall a lad saying "what's this miss?" - it was a red pepper. Many things that would be taken for granted to many of us were alien to these kids - they had never eaten these things before.

    Home ec and food Education are ok, but boring. Let the kids eat, try the tastes, the feel of the foods - capture their interest. THEN teach them how to put meals together, show them how cheap the foods are. Plant the seed of interest in young minds, and you're halfway there.
     
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  9. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    I used to love Home economics at school. cooking from scratch, teachers tasting it ( our H E's teacher would always collar the Science teacher, Mr Cox, we all used to giggle and talk about it ;)) and such pride when we took home a meal that we cooked (a pudding or a cake, which was not an every day occurrence) so my mum had a night off, I was so chuffed :)
     
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  10. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    At my teenagers junior school, the children and parents dug up area's to plant fruit and veg, it was a great hit and successful too. I loved Home Economics at school, obviously writing about it is less interesting than hands on, but cooking the produce was great :)
     
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    #270 Robinredbreast, Mar 21, 2016 at 1:19 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 21, 2016
  11. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    And nothing has changed.
    The urban Victorian poor had access to a lot of street food, pies, etc. And goodness knows what dire ingredients were in them! Watered milk, watered beer, faggots, pasties...

    Back then, it could well be cheaper to buy half a hot pie on the way home, rather than a coalscuttle of fuel to heat your garret for the night... decisions, decisions...
     
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  12. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    Though those in the country side seemed to do better for example I had a great grand uncle who lived not far from Lynton and Lynmouth. All I know about him oddly enough is what he used to eat for breakfast and that he spent his working day in the valley of rocks breaking boulders down with a sledge hammer .

    From what I have been told his morning meal usually consisted of :

    Six rashers of bacon
    six sausages
    six eggs
    loads of fried tomatoes
    and a loaf of bread with lashings of butter

    A couple of pots of tea
    Mind you he was a rather large man by all acounts
    not sure why all the sixes must have been his lucky number maybe.
     
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  13. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    AWESOME!!!!

    I have to admit, with the child mortality rates, the malnutrition, pollution and working conditions, most of those urban poor probably didn't create another generation, so they are unlikely to be our ancestors.

    Half my family were Cornish fishermen, so while I doubt they had a varied intake, it may go a long way to explain why I do well on a fair wack of protein in my diet. :D:D:D
     
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  14. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Mine were highland hunters.
    And boy do I love my meat and fish.
    There's definitely something in it @Brunneria :)
     
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  15. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Mmmmm. School. Mine was turning out accountants & rugby players..

    Not for someone like me. But, I did my "duty" and attended.
    Some seriously dodgy stuff went on in that place..
    I bumped into a classmate about 20 years ago. Chatting we worked out at least 8 of our year had taken their own life..
    Late one night as a kid (12?) I snuck down stairs with a hypo. & while dealing with it put the telly on low. While on the "rise" I saw this..
    & it all made perfect sense... It took all of my character to keep my head down & survive that place...

     
    #275 Jaylee, Mar 21, 2016 at 8:49 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 21, 2016
  16. holmroad

    holmroad Type 1 · Member

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    I certainly feel that the sugar tax could be unfair to we T1 DB's since when I go hypo its a NECESSITY to have some concentrated sugar handy, be it Mars bars, Crunchie Bars or sweet drinks when available, so why should I have to pay more for something which is a LIFELINE for people such as me?
     
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  17. Charliewh

    Charliewh · Newbie

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    Unfortunately is the honey if it shot up immediately.
     
  18. ladybird64

    ladybird64 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Because it's not made or marketed specifically for diabetics! The same goes for sweets and chocolate.. It may be the solution for you, and I understand why those who use them feel hard done by, but while there are other things available on prescription - you won't be seen as a special case.
     
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  19. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Assuming no tax at all paid on dextro tablets??
     
  20. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Good point dd, I worked in a pharmacy a few years back and the owner did mention at some point about taxable items, so we had to press the correct button for the correct merchandise on the till.

    holmroadType 1
    I certainly feel that the sugar tax could be unfair to we T1 DB's since when I go hypo its a NECESSITY to have some concentrated sugar handy, be it Mars bars, Crunchie Bars or sweet drinks when available, so why should I have to pay more for something which is a LIFELINE for people such as me?


    Hi there, I do agree it can be a lifeline, but a few pence isn't going to break the bank, after all, sweets and chocolates are consumed by a large % of the general population.

    It's going to be difficult applying it, because many different avenues will be affected if a sugar tax is introduced, ie why was this certain product taxed and another not, there could be out and out war within the industry, like the advert for the 2 types of Twix, (just a little whimsical thought :rolleyes: ;))
     
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    #280 Robinredbreast, Mar 22, 2016 at 2:09 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 22, 2016
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