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Three Hours After Eating - Is 6.1 Kind Of High In A Non-diabetic?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by ExtremelyW0rried, Jul 7, 2018.

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  1. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    What make of meter are you using to test BG?
     
  2. ExtremelyW0rried

    ExtremelyW0rried Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Contour. Meant to be super accurate.
     
  3. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    That they are! They have a good rep.
    However. There are still variables to take into account regarding the enzymes used on the actual test strip too.? Which affect accuracy. (Pending on batch/climate/storage history.)

    Either way. Your child had a good number thrown up by the meter..

    It's bad enough being "dogged" by this stuff as a kid if you are a diabetic.
    If this behaviour from a parent was happening to me as a non D? By the time I'd hit my early teens. I would probably wish I'd stolen a car..

    I would give what you're doing some considerable forward thinking... :)
     
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  4. ThePenguinPimp

    ThePenguinPimp Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It must be horrible to be so concerned about your child.

    Catching T1 diabetes a couple of weeks or even months early is not going to make a difference to the outcome longterm. If your child DOES develop T1 diabetes when their blood sugars start to get significantly higher it will become very obvious very quickly. Please try to reassure yourself that if this happens you will pick up on it and you will get them the help they need then. All you are doing is putting unnecessary stress on yourself and your child who will be picking up on your anxiety!

    Please take a breath and stop putting yourself and your child through this.
     
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  5. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    I used to give my two kids a 500 gram packet of lollies each week when they were young. :meh:
     
  6. ExtremelyW0rried

    ExtremelyW0rried Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I don’t mean weight... I mean 63g of sugar! That’s how much was in a packet. 63g of sugar is a lot for a toddler. That’s like three days worth of what they recommend.
     
  7. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    The kid still did very well on tthe back of the amount.. "of which are sugars."

    You might need to discuss the amount of sweets with your hubby though..? The primary concern should be more focused on preservation of teeth.
     
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  8. Mike d

    Mike d Type 2 · Expert

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    Skirt around the REAL subject, why don't you .... you're waiting for a calamity

    That's an alarming mindset.
     
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    #28 Mike d, Jul 7, 2018 at 10:34 PM
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2018
  9. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    @ExtremelyW0rried I don't understand this thread at all. The child is well and healthy, there are no problems except what is in your mind. Relax and have fun with your toddler, they grow up all too soon.
     
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  10. Ambersilva

    Ambersilva Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The 63 grams of sweets plus the 60 grams of carbs in the meal is a huge amount for an adult let alone a tiny nearly 3 year old toddler. You should be reassured that your daughter's body had dealt with the massive overdose of carbs so efficiently to get back to safe levels.

    You know yourself as an adult with diabetes how much insulin you would need to cover 120 carbs.
    But her body dealt with it naturally. So now you also know that you need not keep testing her blood sugar levels because she handles all the carbs that are thrown at her extremely well.

    You said that you are going to register for some testing when she is three years old. Why? Why on earth why? Just because you have this stubborn belief that the next time you test her she will be slightly over what you think she should be therefore she must be heading for diabetes. Please stop worrying. And please stop testing her. It isn't necessary.

     
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  11. ExtremelyW0rried

    ExtremelyW0rried Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The trial net scheme is worldwide and looks at preventing and delaying t1. It is a research scheme as much as anything as it identified the antibodies associated with t1 and the likely time to diagnosis.
    They have prevent trials going on - although usually I believe you have to be over 6 to take part so my daughter wouldn’t be eligible but my son would. The prevent trials don’t really prevent, they only delay, but they have had some results dealing onset using anti-inflammatory drugs usually used to treat arthritis.
    Anyone with a 2nd or 1st degree relative with t1 can be tested. Lots of people are positive for antibodies and have avoided dka and had treatment plans in place well before diagnosis. It usually means the honeymoon period is also extended, sometimes just a tiny amount of background insulin can be enough for several years and the strain is removed from the beta cells and blood sugars drop so the attack is slowed down.

    It’s personal preference. I would sooner know than not know if my children are anitobody positive.
     
  12. Mike d

    Mike d Type 2 · Expert

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    Words fail me ...
     
  13. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi & good morning.

    What are the thoughts of your Husband & family GP on this matter..?
     
  14. ExtremelyW0rried

    ExtremelyW0rried Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    As I said it is personal choice. Plenty of people DO have their children checked through trial net annually. I doubt that the gp knows a huge amount about it. My husband doesn’t feel strongly either way. We thought we would see if they were running any prevent trials and if so we’d probably do it as there might be something that could actually help if they are positive for antibodies.

    Why wouldn’t you do that if you could?
     
  15. ExtremelyW0rried

    ExtremelyW0rried Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Why?
    Because I would like to do everything I can to make sure my children are safe? And if there’s anything to try that may delay this horrendous disease and not cause any harm then why wouldn’t you try it?
    I’ve been up all night with my blood sugars. I make hundreds of decisions every day just to stay alive. I’ve done that for over 25 years. Why would you not want to try anything to stop that being your child’s reality?
     
  16. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Expert
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    As parents we should not be testing our childrens blood glucose levels I know this is not what they want and doing it is against their will - if you continue to post suggesting that you are then the thread will be closed - I suggest you consult your GP over health concerns for both yourself and your child.
     
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  17. ExtremelyW0rried

    ExtremelyW0rried Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    No I’m not saying that I have - I was responding to the trial net part!
     
  18. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    This thread is being closed. Having sought views, a wide range have been given, and I see nothing to be gained by further speculation on the future of an innocent child.

    ExtremelyW0rried, your concerns are, in themselves extremely worrying, due to their obsessive nature and the potential to harm, rather than help your child.

    Please take some time to reflct on matters.
     
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