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Too early for a pump?

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by ruby_jane26, Jan 10, 2018.

  1. ruby_jane26

    ruby_jane26 Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hi guys, I have my hba1c appointment soom which is my second hba1c ever. My first was 12.8 (at diagnosis). I feel like i could benefit from an insulin pump and my dsn said a few weeks ago that it shouldn't be a problem going on a pump, just need to sort out funding. The reason for getting a pump is my inability to fully excersise without going hypo (even when reducing insulin), my fear of hypos - i cant sleep unless i know im not in danger of my sugars dropping when i sleep. As you'e prpbably guessed, this means i snack before bed and because of this i have gained weight. Diet alone isnt helping and i would like to get back into excersise like before I had type 1 diabetes. A few hypo scares are what have thrown my confidence off and i dont always feel the hypos come on
    Also because I don't have a routine, my daily routine is non existent. I lead a hectic life and I don't eat regulary at all and this messes with my sugars (even though I try to eat as close to meal times as possible). I'm going off to uni in September to do a nursing degree which will have alot of shift work on placement, I'm just trying to sort myself out now so that I'll have an easier experience in uni.
    A concern of mine is that funding won't be considered because of how long ago I was diagnosed. Do you recommend me going forward and asking about it at my appointment?

    At current I may be having to come off tresiba due to skin reactions. I've heard most other basils arent as flat as tresiba. Maybe the pump will be a better option for that too..?

    Thanks
     
  2. Books1

    Books1 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    If your dsn is saying it shouldn't be a problem you need to follow up with them and find out what the next steps are. There's usually forms for you to complete before they can apply for funding.
    I've just attended my pre Pump meeting but it did take a while to get everything in place.
    Good luck

    F
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

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    One thing I would say is that a pump isn't necessarily going to be a panacea in this situation. It requires more work to get it set up to the correct config and you'll still need to observe careful monitoring and management to manage things like exercise.

    Whilst you're honeymooning, getting the basal levels right is still tricky, and while you'll have the flexibility to reduce insulin amounts, you still need to consider things a couple of hours in advance to get the best results.

    I'm sure it will help, but don't expect it to magically make things easier.
     
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  4. Chowie

    Chowie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Exercise will most probably still give you Hypos with a pump. The advantage is you can reduce your insulin consumption 2 - 4 hrs before you exercise, but you will still have to plan it. If the D team say yes go for it. If the difference is pay for it now or get it free in a year, personally I would wait. I'm about to go onto a pump in just under 2 weeks. In Australia this involves visits to Diabetic Educators x 4, Specialist x 1, Dietician x 2, just to get onto it followed by numerous follow ups. Daily Texts for the first week and the list goes on. Try a Libre first, this will give you an idea what is going on and if you have to have a snack before exercise. It's more than possible you may have skin reactions with the cannula site. Your D team will most probably test that first. As far as a crazy life MDI should be almost as accomodating. I skip meals delay meals up to 6 hrs. I have been warned for the first 3 months a pump is a life changer and not necessarily in a good way. Don't expect to hook it up, off you go and life is great. If you are still at school studying, I wouldn't take the pump on in your final high school year.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
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