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Type 1 Diabetic - Obese and addicted to food

Discussion in 'Eating disorders and diabetes' started by T1Dinsadd, Oct 17, 2019.

  1. T1Dinsadd

    T1Dinsadd · Member

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    Hello - thank you for your reply.




    I wanted to mention on different note my average day(s) from a log that I keep...

    10/14 - (This was a day I had heavy carbs, but was more lenient than normal)
    3:04 AM - 116
    6:05 AM - 143
    7:08 AM - 175
    10:00 AM - 109
    1:00 PM - 215
    3:03 PM - 183
    4:05 PM - 96
    8:15 PM - 82
    10:00 PM - 86

    10/15 -

    3:30AM - 46
    6:00 AM - 296
    7:09 AM - 215
    10:00 AM - 92
    1:50 PM - 175
    3:15 PM - 215
    5:50 PM - 111
    7:30 PM - 176
    8:50 PM - 313
    10:00 PM - 210
    11:00 PM - 110

    10/16 -

    3:20 AM - 70
    6:00 AM - 134
    7:20 AM - 175
    9:00 AM - 216
    10:10AM - 134
    1:10 PM - 52
    2:00 PM - 234
    4:26 PM - 248
    6:43 PM - 143
    8:50PM - 175
    10:00 PM - 222
    11:30 PM - 96

    10/17 -

    1:46 AM - 122
    2:43 AM - 132
    6:45 AM - 143
    7:45 AM - 175
    8:43 AM - 144
    10:00 AM - 101
    1:00 PM - 86
    4:00 PM - 184
    5:16 PM - 215
    7:09 PM - 202
    9:30 PM - 86
    And just now @ 90.
     
  2. T1Dinsadd

    T1Dinsadd · Member

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    I don't always check my blood sugar this much but I did so far this week just to see if it was still normal. Prolly won't check it much next week, maybe twice a day next week or something.
     
  3. T1Dinsadd

    T1Dinsadd · Member

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    Soooooooooo anyone by chance got any opinions ?
     
  4. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Looks like you have a tendency to go high after hypo's. Possibly overtreating?
    What insulins are you on? Most of us test at the least before meals to decide how much quick acting insulin to take, as it depends on the amount of carbs and on current bg.
    A lot of us test after meals as well to see if a correction is needed. How do you decide on dosing with only 2 tests?
    Do you drive? In the UK it's mandatory to test before driving and every 2 hours to prevent hypo's. Even if it's not mandatory where you live I wouldn't dare to drive without knowing where my bg is at.

    I'm sorry i can't be of help as to your original question.
     
  5. T1Dinsadd

    T1Dinsadd · Member

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    Yes, definitely overeating after hypos.

    I'm on Apidra and Lantus.
    My bg levels are more often than not completely normal before I eat... just from years of experience I guess.... and I did show my tests after meals, two hours after actually. But like I said before, the reason it gets so high is due to how many carbs I am eating not the insulin amount I am taking.
     
  6. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    @T1Dinsadd - Hello there. I'm not going to say anything about your insulin or blood glucose levels, as others have made comment, but maybe touch on what you describe as your addiction.

    Have you considered having a look at what you're eating, from a symptoms perspective, as well as blood sugar? In your shoes, I'd look to go through a period of fairly intensive monitoring, recording blood sugars, everything eaten and drunk, any exercise taken, and symptoms. From there you might be able to see trends.

    I'm sort of wondering if you have a sensitivity to something you are eating; particularly as you identify your over-indulgence seems to focus on Chinese food.

    My rationale is many moons ago, well before diabetes entered my life, I was having symptoms - very different to you, but having rejected my GP's suggestion of high doseages of painkillers, I went to see a naturopath, who also ran some tests. She then suggested she felt I had a food intolerance and put me on an elimination diet. The diet was pretty dismal - lots of boiled rice and chicken and not too much more for a period, then slowly adding foods back.

    In terms of adding back, she suggested I start with any foods I liked and couldn't really get enough of. I identified those as tomatoes, oranges and a couple of other things.

    When it came to it, I decided to go a little off-piste and try adding in some other things first, just to make my meals a little more interesting, but when I did get to those "favourite foods", hey presto, the symptoms reappeared.

    Her feedback was that consuming foods where an intolerance exists triggers reactions around cortisol and histamine which are strong hormones.

    Those foods were gone from my day to eating for quite some time. I don't eat oranges anymore, but I can now happily have tomatoes, without any reaction.

    You may just find you have a particular trigger food, like wheat noodles, or even MSG. Could be worthwhile.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  7. Ellenor2000

    Ellenor2000 · Well-Known Member

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    Leptin resistance is a delusion. What's actually happening is that insulin is a leptin antagonist. So if you're ODing on insulin, while leptin will still exhibit its effect of cancelling energy conservation peripherally (reproduction will work, etc), it will not cancel hunger in the brain. Cortisol also reduces leptin secretion and leptin response.
     
  8. Ellenor2000

    Ellenor2000 · Well-Known Member

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    What's the problem with protein?
     
  9. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I wonder why they are spending money on research on leptin resistance when it's a delusion. In the UK.
     
  10. Ellenor2000

    Ellenor2000 · Well-Known Member

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    Because they want to do anything except believe that the pathology of hyperadiposity is caused by chronic overdosing of insulin (carb-fat diets, low fat in the susceptible also, cortisol, and fructose abuse) and that alone. Even the "leptin resistance" (in reality, it's another signal that overrides the high leptin and makes you eat even though you aren't hungry) is downstream of the insulin. (OP of course needs to take insulin if they do not want to suffer from a fatal catabolic disease along with high blood sugars - I am not saying insulin is bad, only that overdosing insulin, even in the absence of resulting hypoglycemia, is bad.)

    Obesity research is a "scientific" field full of non-science. They're basically chasing cold fusion up in that thing.

    If leptin resistance (as in, a reduction in response to leptin as levels rise independently of any other factor) was real, you would expect fat people to have symptoms of hypothyroidism (since low leptin causes a low triiodothyronine level), indistinguishable from someone who was fat because they actually were hypothyroid. That's not happening.
     
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  11. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
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    Do you have links for these claims @Ellenor2000 ?
     
  12. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    Elenor, I think reading some of the thyroid fora would demonstrate there are many overweight people exhibiting signs of hypothyroidism with low FT3 levels. One of the issues in U.K. Is the complete resistance of the NHS to routinely test FT3 levels. The NHS is fixated on the useless TSH.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  13. novorapidboi26

    novorapidboi26 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I was about the same as you less than 6 months ago..............I started on slimming world, which I think is UK based, but ultimately its all about making some small changes to help lose weight.......,EDIT: I think its available in the states

    one of the things you can have that is free on the diet is pasta..........as long as it isn't wrapped in high fat and sugary sauces...you can mix in lean meats, vegetables and tomato based sauces.....

    have a google online for recipes....

    the main point I am making is you can still stuff your face and lose wright at the same time.....
     
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  14. Wayward Blood

    Wayward Blood Type 1 · Member

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    Sadly, insulin comes with a little-discussed sting in the tail: it has a big impact on your hunger levels. The more insulin in your system, the hungrier you’ll be. That’s why it’s so hard to break the cycle: you’re starving, so you eat. Because of that, you need more insulin. Which makes you even hungrier, so you eat more, and so on. I remember being able to order a large pizza with potato wedges and a tub of ice cream, of which I’d eat at least half. I’d still be starving afterwards because of the 30+ units of short acting insulin I’d have to inject.

    I switched to a low carbohydrate diet in 2014, and I was floored by the difference it made. In all honesty it was extremely difficult for the first few weeks, but I’m so glad I stuck with it.

    If it’s something you’re interested in, it’s really important to research thoroughly to avoid both high and low blood sugar levels. Dr Bernstein’s ‘Complete diabetes solution’ and Jenny Ruhl’s ‘Diabetes 101’ are both excellent books about managing diabetes. Very hardcore, and Dr Bernstein’s book in particular pulls no punches, but both authors are diabetics themselves and really know what they’re talking about. Dr Bernstein is now in his 80s and was diagnosed with Type 1 in childhood.
     
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  15. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I'm a type2 on linsulin therapy and losing weight..... Oh and hv hypothyroidism. I was fighting hunger no matter my diet due to insulin but leptin resistance is a side affect from insulin resistance.... maybe or maybe not.
    I think what pharmaceuticals are trying to get is a treatment which allows insulin to treat but not harm leptin regulation as the same time. Type2s mainly or mostly need no weight gain whilst using insulin to prevent high bgs damaging the body. The holy grail eh?
     
  16. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    Hi @T1Dinsadd - just catching up on your thread.

    I’m another T1 following a low carb way of eating, and there’s loads of ways to enjoy your favourite foods with a few adjustments, although you’ll need to cook rather than buy pre-prepared food. I’m having pizza tonight. I make the base (2tbsp ground almonds, 1tbsp psyllium husk powder, 1/2tsp baking powder, 2 eggs and some seasonings, mixed in a plastic container, microwaved for 2 1/2 minutes), top with some tomato purée and whatever toppings I fancy and mozzarella, cooked in the oven until golden brown. It keeps me fuller for longer than the standard bread based version, and needs maybe 1.5u insulin max.

    As for over-treating hypos, it’s so easily done with the panic signals the brain is sending out. I find they’re easier to manage if I regard it as a “medical emergency” rather than an opportunity to eat all my favourite treat foods - let’s face it, it’s not like you get chance to savour them when you’re shoving them down your neck as fast as possible. I’ve established that a 3 gram of glucose dextrose tablet raises me by about 0.6mmol (about 11 in American units), so just take one or two. And have your treats another time, when you can really enjoy them, just dose properly for them :)
     
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  17. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi

    I just wanted to say 'been there are done that' though I was a bulimic so I understand your compulsion to eat carbs is perhaps overriding your rational desire to be healthier. I think having too much insulin and slightly too much glucose (as with all type 1s) isn't sustainable in the long term and is consuming far too much of your head space!
    I'd like to suggest Elizabeth Benton's podcast as a great resource. She was an obese lady who was frustrated at why she could be successful in other areas of her life e.g. getting out of debt and building up her career but could not do so with weight loss.
    https://primalpotential.com/primal-potential-podcast/
    If you like her style then she does an e course about emotional eating which I did and still find useful a few years on. The focus is not on weight loss but more about mindset.
    I also found this bariatric surgeon quite interesting because he treats patients' carb addictions before he looks at surgery:


    YOu sound as if you are open to finding a new way but don't get stuck in the research here and do decide on some action even if it is just picking one thing you will consistently do well for today then building from there.
     
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