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Type 1 with a serious ED

Discussion in 'Eating disorders and diabetes' started by staycee_xx, Jan 30, 2018.

  1. staycee_xx

    staycee_xx Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you. I know I am damaging myself with my actions and I need to change how I think. I agree completely and I hope I can manage to do it before its too late x
     
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  2. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Moderator
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    Hi @staycee_xx , and welcome to the forum.

    I'm so sorry you are having such a rough time of things at the moment, but very well done on seeking help. That's a massive step forward.

    I'm not T1, and have never had to self-inject, so can't offer you any pearls of wisdom there, but I am someone who has recovered from an eating disorder. I know it's a tough old road, and I know how difficult it is to change harmful behaviours. It's no walk in the park, but it is do-able.

    I'll tag @jacqfromdwed and @asortafairytale here. They are members of DWED (Disbetics With Eating Disorders) who have lots of experience with T1 and EDs.

    Good luck with it all, and please do stick with it. Life's for living, and I honestly believe my own ED was the masking of me, in a bizarre and perverse way. I learned so much about myself and I learned how much I wanted to live my life; live it well and live it BIG.
     
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  3. staycee_xx

    staycee_xx Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you for this. I am grateful for any advice at the moment x
     
  4. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    I know it may of sounded a little harsh and I appreciate you have a good grasp on the reality of the situation so I really hope you do get the right support to help you move on from this, my friends daughter is a type 1 who used insulin to control her weight she’s only early twenties and a bright young thing but already has eye and nerve issues and is moving forward but still has some issues but it’s harder for her to talk about it, you sound so much more positive and are talking about it so I am sure you will be fine, where there’s a will there’s a way :)
     
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  5. staycee_xx

    staycee_xx Type 1 · Member

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    No I definitely need to hear it. Tough love an all that! I think its relief more than anything. I’ve never spoken to anyone or admitted I had missed injections. Its been going on for 3 years and theres only so many excuses you can make for ‘missed’ drs appts etc. I know I need to change my ways and I am grateful for your support x
     
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  6. ExtremelyW0rried

    ExtremelyW0rried Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It might be too soon or you might not like the idea but what about an insulin pump? One cannula change every three days.
    There's also something called an I-port which it made by medronic and you put it on and inject through it. Means that you don't have to wear a pump if you don't like the idea of being attached to something all the time but don't have to inject.

    One plus of the pump - not that I am suggesting you have any need to worry about your weight at all - is that it runs only on fast acting insulins whixh are less likely to cause weight gain. Also if you exercise you can reduce the insulin you are taking so you don't hypo and have to treat the low. It may be something to consider?
     
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  7. staycee_xx

    staycee_xx Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you, I might discuss this with my GP at my next appointment. The idea of having no control is making me feel slightly anxious. Its definitely something to consider though x
     
  8. ExtremelyW0rried

    ExtremelyW0rried Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You tell the pump how much you want it to deliver and when though.
    It just means when you eat you can just put the insulin amount into your pump and it delivers it. It delivers a small amount of background insulin all the time but you programme it to do so.
    I don't really think about the fact I'm giving insulin when I use it in the same way as I did when injecting so psychologically you may feel differently about it.
     
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  9. staycee_xx

    staycee_xx Type 1 · Member

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    I dont really know a lot about the pumps to be honest. I’ve been in denial about the whole diabetes condition for a couple of years. I had an ignorance is bliss attitude! Silly, I know!
    I will certainly have a chat with my GP, it may be a good way forward x
     
  10. ExtremelyW0rried

    ExtremelyW0rried Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes it is worth looking at. It is maybe a bit overwhelming right now and it might seem an upheaval but longer term it might be a better solution.
    It is about the closest you can get to not being diabetic whilst still being diabetic in my opinion. It isn't a miracle and it takes work to sort out the background levels but it gives you a lot more flexibility and crucially you wouldn't have to physically inject every time you eat.
    I have a t1 friend who ignored it totally for about a decade. She is now on a pump and has much better control and a much better outlook but unfortunately she has been left with a lot of complications from when she just behaved as though she still had a functioning pancreas.
    Do you have a diabetes specialist nurse? I know it's tough when you don't feel like it probably, but give them a call if you have. The GP will probably have limited knowledge of insulin pumps but a DSN should know quite a lot and may be able to show and demonstrate various ones to you.
     
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  11. staycee_xx

    staycee_xx Type 1 · Member

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    Thats really helpful. Its comforting knowing you’re not alone. I find it embarrassing to talk to someone face to face about the problems I have with bingeing and injecting and I always play it down. I guess I feel stupid but knowing it affects a lot of people makes me feel slightly more assured. I just need to be open and honest with professionals instead of lying and covering things up/making excuses.
    I do have a DSN (appointed following my discharge from hospital), I havent met with her yet (appt due on 14th feb - of all days!) but will ask her for some options when we meet.
    Thanks again for your help x
     
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  12. paulus1

    paulus1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    are you getting counselling if not get it. you must take it.

    Short term
    These are the short term symptoms of patients with diabulimia

    Medium term
    These are the medium term symptoms of patients with diabulimia. They are prevalent when diabulimia has not been treated and hence also include the short term symptoms

    Long term[edit]
    If a person with Type 1 diabetes who has diabulimia suffers from the disease for more than a short time—usually due to alternating phases during which insulin is injected properly, and relapses, during which they have diabulimia—then the following longer-term symptoms can be expected:

    • Severe kidney damage - high blood sugar can overwork the kidneys, eventually leading to kidney failure and the need for a kidney transplant [6]
    • Severe neuropathy (nerve damage to hands and feet)
    • Extreme fatigue
    • Edema (during blood sugars controlled phases)
    • Heart problems
    • High cholesterol
    • Osteoporosis
    • Death
    sorry pet your not fat and even if you where its better than being dead. you need support get your doctor to sort it urgently.
     
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  13. staycee_xx

    staycee_xx Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you. I hadn’t even heard of diabulimia before I joined here this evening. I have an appointment with a psychologist on 15th feb and DPN on 14th x
     
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  14. paulus1

    paulus1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    excellent. its important that its dealt with by your full health team. your not alone in this just remember if your picture is right then you are not fat or overweight. your mind may be locked on that but its the least important health issue you face. i have the opposite issue i over eat. food issues are hard for people to understand. make sure you tell your diabetic team that you have this issue. is there anyone tha tcould support your medication until your in a better situation.
     
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  15. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
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    If you struggle to talk face to face then write it down. You have time between now and the DSN appointment to note how you feel and what you do in response to those feelings.
     
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  16. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    A psychologist can help you to change your thinking around diabetes and insulin, but bear in mind you must go in with open ears and willing to change.

    I've had one to one therapy ref cancer and the likes but it has to be the person that actually wants to change and to find everything as joyful and a blessing rather than negativity around living...

    You can do it, I had a friend in ED clinic for 6 months and she came out otherside ok. Still obsessive but is now generating her obsession in to helping others beat it rather than being one that is defeated by it.
     
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  17. Mel dCP

    Mel dCP Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    She’s got a Libre, so I doubt she fingerpricks that much. She probably has a pump. And I’m not impressed with her attempts to run the country either :p /endpoliticalrant
     
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  18. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Impressed or not, she still runs the Country with her condition so I can only imagine the pressure and stresses adding to it all whilst managing her health.
     
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  19. staycee_xx

    staycee_xx Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you.
    The problem I have at the moment is that I know its dangerous and stupid but at the moment the thought of injecting and ‘Absorbing’ my binge calories outweighs this and wins all the time.
    Hopefully attending a clinic will change my thinking x
     
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  20. staycee_xx

    staycee_xx Type 1 · Member

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    I havent told anyone about what im doing. I pretend to inject when i am around people, i insert the needle but dont actually administer any insulin. My family think I had too much alcohol over Christmas and thats how I ended up in hospital. Im was so embarrassed that I just agreed with them and went along with it.
    It was the DN in ICU who dragged it out of me because it was obvious by my readings that something had been going on for months.
    I am going to go to my appt and then maybe sit down with family and friends to discuss it with them then x
     
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