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Type 3 diabetes

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by dawnmc, Sep 11, 2012.

  1. dawnmc

    dawnmc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  2. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    I think your link is getting at the people who produce junk food within the industry.

    Results from this study show that participants who were either overweight or obese and had at least two metabolic abnormalities, had the fastest decline, whilst obesity and conditions such as diabetes were individually found to have a significant effect on cognition.
    http://alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/n ... ewsID=1305

    You can be obese without eating junk food as some people are. They eat the right things but in too big a portion size. We all know that junk food as an occasional treat will not do the damage that living on these foods will create within our bodies.

    Dementia sufferers come in all shapes and sizes and many have eaten healthily throughout their lives. If dementia in later life is a worry for anybody then it would seem sensible to get your diabetes, weight and other metabolic factors under control to lessen the risk.

    Dementia can occur in younger people too.
    http://alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/d ... mentID=164
     
  3. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    My mum had a form of Dementia( she was in her 70's, and she cooked good home wholesome food, thats what I grew up on, with Whimpys , fish suppers, sweets biccys etc only as a treat. best wishes RRB
     
  4. Dillinger

    Dillinger Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Here's some stuff on the benefits of low carbing and demenita

    http://cauk.atkins.com/blog/colette-hei ... -diet.html

    So, could it be the carbs that are really the problem? Just like they are for diabetes, and supposedly for heart disease and some cancers?

    Dillinger
     
  5. clearviews

    clearviews · Well-Known Member

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  6. jopar

    jopar · Well-Known Member

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    What a load of rubbish that is...

    There are around 96 different forms of dementia, but one thing that is common to most suffers, is weight issues and the ability to maintain weight... Dementia even if the suffer loses mobility uses up a lot of energy...

    So they need a high calorific diet, which in the main is based around, HIgh Carbs, High Fats, and often supplemented with Proteins drink supplements..(build up drinks)...

    There are various other factors that need to be taken into consideration, some is dependant on the type of dementia the individual is suffering from, but includes things such as small appetite, the inability to maintain concentration long enough to consume a reasonable amount of foods.... Food texture can create problems for some just a small example of problems..

    Also often dementia suffer's aren't just on the go all the time, but can have a level of steady activity interspersed with high activity etc...

    Which Atkins diet wouldn't actually do at all, as energy is many derived from Protein and fats, it requires a bigger quantity to food to be consumed, which in most cases you wouldn't achieve with somebody who suffers with a dementia, hence why you off them something, that is high carb, high fat based, as energy requirements can be meet better within a smaller quantity of food..

    Perhaps the author should, actually spend some time within a dementia unit, to understand more about dementia....
     
  7. librarising

    librarising LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Could you actually refute the arguments in the article ?

    I'm not sure you and Dillinger are on the same page

    Geoff
     
  8. xyzzy

    xyzzy Other · Well-Known Member

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    There appears to be evidence that Ketogenic diets work for a range of brain and age related disorders. Taken from this 2012 article which examines the effects of KD on a range of conditions.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3321471/pdf/fphar-03-00059.pdf

    Specifically for Alzheimers take this for example. Heavy going but puts a positive case for ketosis being beneficial.

     
  9. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    A ketogenic agent was used with a normal diet. ("NeoBee 895; a common food ingredient, made using glycerin from vegetable oil and fatty acids from coconut or palm kernel oil") Patients with Alzheimer's are unlikely to stick to a ketogenic diet and indeed it proved unnecessary.
    The agent induced very mild ketosis .This form of ketogenic treatment improved the cognition of some people with Alzheimer's disease but not others. Those that showed most improvement were those who did not have the APOE allele*
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2731764/

    *The Apoe allele is one that is associated with an increased number of protein clumps, called amyloid plaques, in the brain tissue of affected people. This has been discovered to increase the risk of ALzheimers but not "all people with Alzheimer disease have the APOE e4 allele, and not all people who have this allele will develop the disease"
    (http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/APOE)

    There are also quite a few studies on the Med diet and Alzheimers, both as a reduction in risk and a diet to enhance cognitive function.
     
  10. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    Re what helps/causes cognitive decline in the elderly
    Just with dietary possibilities the literature suggests any number of things, but a lot supporting Jopar's post about adequate nutrition.

    First search results :Cognitive function elderly carbohydrate fat protein

    1) Cognitive performance (in the elderly) can be enhanced with glucose and dietary carbohydrates
    2) A diet with less fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol, and more carbohydrate, fiber, vitamins (especially folate, vitamins C and E, and beta-carotenes), and minerals (iron and zinc) may be advisable not only to improve the general health of the elderly but also to improve cognitive function
    3)Dietary protein, carbohydrate, and fat enhance memory performance in the healthy elderly
    4) The consumption of adequate nutrients, by taking sufficient amounts and variety of foods, may be important in maintaining adequate cognitive function in elderly Koreans.
    5). Nutrition-related risk factors may include inadequacy of essential nutrients (vitamins B12, B6,and folate and antioxidants C, E and b-carotene) andnutrition-related disorders, as hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriacylglycerolaemia, hypertension, and diabetes
    However, even optimal intake of nutrients does not protect people from dementia
    6) macronutrient intakes and functional or cognitive parameters were found to be mutually independent; this suggests that macronutrient deficiencies are of little importance in the worsening functional or mental autonomy of the elderly.

    Gave up on looking each one up here but:
    It could also be associated with too much copper and iron, (but too little is also bad),too much saturated fat, too little vitamin D. It might be improved by green tea (if you are a mouse). Vitamin E might play a role (don't know what as the abstract doesn't say)

    And ,If you are a mouse that has had her ovaries removed, a high cholesterol diet will improve your oestrogen levels and you will be better at finding your way round a maze .
     
  11. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have noticed with elderly people that they are often malnourished.

    So I go along with the thinking that adequate amounts of nourishing food are a key factor here. Starvation, at any age will affect cognition and brain function generally.

    Unfortunately the elderly are often offered meals which are highly processed, pre-packaged, and low in nutrients. They are then given high-carb Build-up type drinks. Neither of these are providing a balanced nutritious diet.

    So I think we need to remember that the elderly are seldom on a level playing field here. High carb, or high protein or high fat is not the same for them as for younger people not dependant on pre-cooked processed food. The definition of 'High' is from a different starting point. And their ability to process food, plus interactions with medication affecting their digestion and absorption, can be a major factor in their weight loss and malnutrition.

    So the elderly, as with all of us, need a diet with sufficient carbs, fats and protein for their needs. Which may well mean higher than they are having now, but it will bring them up to the levels they should be having. Not higher as in "higher than an average person"

    All these terms like "higher" are relative to what they are being compared to. I f their intake is lower than they need, then 'higher' brings them up to 'average'.

    http://www.dietetics.co.uk/article-undernutrition-in-the-elderly.asp
     
  12. Unbeliever

    Unbeliever · Well-Known Member

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    The crux of the matter , as ever, is assessng the needs of the individual and reacting to them. If only there were an easy way to do this.
     
  13. xyzzy

    xyzzy Other · Well-Known Member

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    A lot of the studies show that a large part of Alzheimers is genetically determined to a large extent. Dr Briffa sums it up nicely on his blog in my opinion. http://www.drbriffa.com/2008/04/11/...-plays-a-role-in-the-development-of-dementia/ I take the same view with all of this as I do with cholesterol which is there is far too much competing evidence to be totally persuaded one was or the other at the moment however I do think his proposal of "One strategy here (again) is to ensure the diet is low in foods which disrupt blood sugar." sounds a reasonable way of attempting to minimize risk.

     
  14. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    My 89 yr old father is in hospital, this is the 2nd time in only a couple of weeks. When he was first admitted he weighed 52 k, now his weight is just 50k. He has never been a big man, always slender. He used to cook his favourite meal of tatties and mince, but only ate a very small amount of it. He cooks bacon, in one slice of bread and cuts the sandwich in half and most of the time he eats only one small square. He used to have Ensure drinks but these were stopped and relaced with packets of complan,( because these are cheaper than the Ensure) which he doesn't like, he did drink the Ensure drinks, but rarely finished one. Yesterday at dinner time it was Cottage Pie with 2 veg and a pear and custard crumble dessert, all he ate was some of the Cottage pie.

    Every week i get shopping for him, most of the time now its conveinence food because, to me, at least he will eat these, even though it isn't the type of food he used to eat, especially when my mum was alive. When she had a form of dementia he took over the role of preparing and cooking the meals. I might give him a cup of tea with a small pork pie cut into four with a nice dollop of his favourite english mustard. He also likes the small individual Mr Kipling cakes which is given freely by me with yet another cup of tea. I look at the shopping in the trolley and think OMG this is what I AM buying for him At the end of the day all I'm concerned about is getting some food, any food into him. His intake of food has declined alot over the years, I cant force him, but at least he's eating :D even though he eats like a sparow, Its a huge worry and I know the elderly persons appetite can decline over the years. The hospital is concerned about his confusion, but he was ill and in unfimiliar surroundings. I am meeting with his doctor soon, to try and get him back on the Ensure drinks. I would love it if my father was 'average' but that will probably be unlikely.
    Seeing your loved ones going into decline is upsetting and bewildering, especially when all the memories of how they used to be come flooding back, but he still has his sense of humour and makes the nurses laugh :lol: Best wishes RRB
     
  15. clearviews

    clearviews · Well-Known Member

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    While "good" nutrition is desirable for the elderly I am not sure if my definition is the same as the HPs as to what constitutes "good". Just as I know I cannot reverse my T2 I know I cannot reverse my parent's dementias. So at best I hope that I can be a dutiful and caring daughter for them.
    I would like to think that I am able to make a difference to my future and take active steps to delay or prevent dementia. As with my diabetic journey I do my reading and take a pathway of informed choice.
    I do suspect that a carb level that was once promoted as healthy and a fat avoidance regime to be the key suspects in the arrival of increasing numbers in dementia, obesity and T2 and will continue my LCHF journey .
    If I am still posting in this forum and making sense in 24 years time then you will know that it worked for me!!!!!!
    Alison
    :thumbup: :wave: :D
     
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