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Type1. Diabetes and work

Discussion in 'Jobs and Employment' started by Adeydee95, Oct 10, 2016.

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  1. Adeydee95

    Adeydee95 Type 1 · Member

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    Need a little bit of advice, I've been diabetic for 9 years and recently my manager has been commenting on my condition, such as calling me diabetic amy, telling me what I should and shouldn't be eating. He also makes me stand for a 9 hour shift even tho I have an ulcer on my leg and should be sitting down...what can I do to stop this happening?
     
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  2. CarbsRok

    CarbsRok Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Put in a grievance, there's no if's or buts that is bullying. Other option is go off sick until the ulcer heals which you should not have to do if reasonable adjustments are made so you can do your job properly.
     
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  3. Adeydee95

    Adeydee95 Type 1 · Member

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    I've had this ulcer for just over a year now so shouldn't be possible to take time off, the old manager we had understood everything but this new one doesn't seem to care, he clearly doesn't know anything about the condition and doesn't listen when I try to explain it to him
     
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  4. Salvia

    Salvia Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    All the more reason to raise a formal complaint about your treatment. If you have tried to explain & he has simply ignored you, then that is abuse of his position. It appears that you have previously had adjustments made to accommodate your condition (the ulcer) , so if those adjustments are no longer being made, possibly going off sick might be your only option. Looks like you may have to go over his head, or to your personnel dept to tell them of what's happening. It might be hard for you to do, but this needs to be nipped in the bud
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    That is disgraceful behaviour by the manager, make a complaint to HR or involve your Trade Union Rep, no one should be subjected to that treatment and he needs brought down a peg or two (or better still sacked).
     
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  6. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    • Informative Informative x 1
  7. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    @Adeydee95 That's bullying - no doubt about it. He's either a thoughtless idiot or is purposely choosing to pick on you.

    I second all the above advice to make a complaint and stick up for your rights. Bullying like this is despicable.
     
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  8. annie66

    annie66 Type 2 · Newbie

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    There is also a bullying hotline you will get number on web.
    I am so sorry you are having to put up with this.
     
  9. GrantGam

    GrantGam Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    He simply would not approach a male with that behaviour. I find bullying in the workplace unacceptable in any form. But when it's carried out by a male towards a female, it's even more pathetic.

    If there's any way that you can prove that he is discriminating against you (witness(es), audio recording, etc) then this will help him get the necessary disciplinary action.

    Unfortunately, conflicts between two people in the workplace often get overlooked when it's one person's word against another's. Further to that, the addition of "rank" or "seniority" into the equation, only makes matters worse sometimes.

    Go as high up the ladder as you can to get this guy a good roasting from his boss. He sounds very much like a waste of skin.

    Regards,
    Grant
     
  10. Humma

    Humma Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  11. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    I would tend to approach this, in the very short term differently to others suggest. I guess I'm trying to apply the logic I would as a Manager hearing a grievance and how I might react.

    To be clear, I'm not telling you what to do. That wouldn't be appropriate, but just giving an alternative viewpoint. Here's what I would do.

    Firstly, I would ask for a short meeting with my Manager. During that meeting, I would explain what he is doing and explain how it makes you feel, plus stating how standing for long periods impacts you.

    At some point during that discussion, I would ask him/her how he/she would feel if he were on the receiving end of that experience. His feedback will give you clues to your next move.

    Either way, you should follow up the meeting with an email, just summarising what was discussed and any suggestions/promises/actions agreed or suggested, then you also have a written record of the interaction.

    If they are horrified, they may immediately start doing things differently. Maybe they have no clue. If they shrug and suggest that's just how it is, then you have your clear direction and that would be to raise it officially. Doing things in that way would show any Hearing/Investigating Manager that you have actively trie to resolve the issue for yourself.

    In the meantime, I suggest you document each and every time such an action happens. You can use a simple spreadsheet to do this to ensure you records the date, time, what they did, how you reacted and how you felt.

    No Hearing/Investigating Manager is likely to be too impressed by statements like, "he often does x", "he says things like x". Being vague and non-specific weakens your case, and gives the Hearing/Investigating Manager little to go on. If this goes to an formal investigation, both parties, as well as any colleagues who may have witnessed these activities will be interviewed and at that point your Manager will be fighting his corner, and it can be amazing how creative the memory can become when someone under pressure.

    I do hope it doesn't come to a grievance process as they can be lengthy and highly stressful, but if it becomes your only credible option, then it has to be done, but you will be showing yourself in the most professional light.

    Good luck with it all.
     
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  12. nbrock2

    nbrock2 Type 2 · Newbie

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    This comes under the disability discrimination act so see HR or union rep or health and safety officials.
     
  13. Adeydee95

    Adeydee95 Type 1 · Member

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    Just want to check if I'm right here. if I have a diabetic ulcer and it is not healing should I be resting it as I work in sales and my manager wants me to stand for my 9 hour shifts without being able to sit down even 10 minutes at a time. any advice you have would be great .
     
  14. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    I'd check with your nurse or doctor and get advice from them. You could also ask for a note/letter that you could give your employer if the medical advice says you need to rest your foot.
     
  15. Duncan57

    Duncan57 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If you are not in a Union, contact ACAS for free employment advice.
    http://m.acas.org.uk/
     
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  16. ATAT23

    ATAT23 Type 1 · Member

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    I would take it to a union as it's discrimination see the Equality Act 2010
     
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