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Type1. Protein??

Discussion in 'Low-carb Diet Forum' started by vxrich, Oct 21, 2015.

  1. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    No, that is true, and no-one is saying that protein is the only way to cause the alpha cells to secrete glucagon. I'm sure there are other mechanisms that trigger it as well! I've edited my original post to make it clear that this is discussing only dietary protein.
     
  2. reidpj

    reidpj · Well-Known Member

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    I may be wrong, but I'm sure that glucagon is secreted when protein is eaten, independent of BS levels.
     
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  3. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    My experiments on me would back that up.
     
  4. mfactor

    mfactor Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yep the amount of protein on body building sites is over the top for regular joes... I took mine from here http://keto-calculator.ankerl.com/ which gave me a range from 105g to170g a day of protein (I weigh 115kg)..

    Seems to be working I am losing fat and putting on muscle (LCHF), but its probably muscle memory as I lost a lot over the last couple of years trying (and failing) to control T2..

    My bloods are now in the normal range and I feel good ... so that will do me....


    Gotta admit a lot over the last 2 pages is over my head , so if anyone fancies giving me the laymans version :)..............
     
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  5. mfactor

    mfactor Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    creamy garlic mushrooms, fry gently a small amount of onions, garlic add mushrooms add cream reduce ...add salt pepper chives or whatever ...lovely................
     
  6. reidpj

    reidpj · Well-Known Member

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    Glucagon is secreted by the pancreas when you eat protein, experience low blood sugar, or have an adrenaline surge. The glucagon will stimulate your liver to make new glucose, and to release it (along with some stored glucose) into your blood stream; thereby, increasing your blood sugar levels, unless something stops it. High concentrations of insulin (and smaller quantities of amylin - also, secreted by the pancreas) can stop the pancreas releasing glucagon (much higher than anyone can safely inject); lower concentrations (but still much higher than is safely injected) may be responsible for blocking glucagon's action on the liver. Insulin is needed to get protein into muscle cells as well a dealing with blood glucose - OK if you've got plenty of it, but a problem for diabetics. Various drugs can suppress glucagon secreation and action.

    I think.......;)
     
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  7. reidpj

    reidpj · Well-Known Member

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    Or......... High glucagon levels (caused by, but not exclusively, high dietary protein) will up your blood sugar levels unless you do something about it....
     
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  8. vxrich

    vxrich Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    mfactor I actually had that a few weeks ago and totally forgot about that! That's on my menu tonight then!
    Everyone else, thanks for the help but it's gone a bit over my head now(hope it's not just meo_O)
     
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    #28 vxrich, Oct 22, 2015 at 6:29 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 22, 2015
  9. mfactor

    mfactor Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    So that means that if my bloods are good, (6.3 this afternoon 2 hours after a protein shake) then my protein intake is fine ???
     
  10. vxrich

    vxrich Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Glad it's not just me! Hehe
     
  11. reidpj

    reidpj · Well-Known Member

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    Only if you're happy with 6.3 They may be lower if you only found that you, in reality, only need half the drink - plus it can be extra stressful for the body to excrete masses of protein. Best thing to do is buy some 'pee strips' that measure protein (e.g. Item # 310256074799 On eBay UK), and aim to have a small amount of excreted protein showing - that way you know that you're getting enough protein to cover your personal needs, but not too much - if that makes sense.....
     
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  12. vxrich

    vxrich Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Confused.com!
    So if I upped my protein to a level that I think I need to consume for my training, bs are good, 0.9 ketone reading is that OK?
    Bit confused about GNG? This is bad right? If I'm bolusing for protein Im in a state of GNG and not ketosis?
    And I thought this lchf diet was gonna be easy. How wrong was I! Hehe
     
  13. reidpj

    reidpj · Well-Known Member

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    You really won't need as much protein as you think.
    Can't see a problem with that, apart from the upping the protein - you'd really be surprised at how little protein you actually need - even if you're training.

    Don't fret over GNG; it's a perfectly natural process. If your BS gets too high, just cut back on the carbs or protein.
     
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  14. vxrich

    vxrich Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Tbh reidpj having had a few probs over the last few weeks with rising bs things seem to have settled down again so I figure if it works, don't fix it! So I'll take your advice thanks!
     
  15. TorqPenderloin

    TorqPenderloin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I haven't noticed any glucose spikes eating protein, but I do seem to get more hypos when I eat LESS protein.

    Could be coincidence, but whatever it is was enough to make me have to drop from 24 units of basal/day down to 16/day.
     
  16. mfactor

    mfactor Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Cheers , will have a look at those strips thanks..............
     
  17. reidpj

    reidpj · Well-Known Member

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    Your BS may be lower if you took the protein in a more natural food form as opposed to the shake, or maybe split the drink into 2 or 3 servings and spread them out - not such a 'rush' of glycogen.
     
  18. reidpj

    reidpj · Well-Known Member

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  19. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    The issue is that T1s especially and to some extent T2s metabolisms work differently. In a T1, it's not explicitly that protein drives GNG, it's that Protein drives a glucagon release without anything to counter it and this results in GNG. Thus the use of non-diabetic subjects doesn't really give insight into what happens in diabetic subjects.
     
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